Orality, Intertextuality, and the Revised Common Lectionary, by Amy C. Schifrin

Started by Richard Johnson, February 11, 2023, 03:34:29 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

Charles Austin

Word count. Number of printed pages. Eschewing extemporizing. Oral practice.
It ain't rocket surgery to keep one's sermons a particular length.
Or a big clock facing you in the pulpit.
Iowa-born. Long-time in NY/New Jersey, former LWF staff in Geneva.
ELCA PASTOR, ordained 1967. Former journalist. Retired in Minneapolis. Often critical of the ELCA, but more often a defender of its mission. Ignoring the not-so-subtle rude insults which often appear here.

DCharlton

Quote from: Charles Austin on February 14, 2023, 09:35:25 AM
Word count. Number of printed pages. Eschewing extemporizing. Oral practice.
It ain't rocket surgery to keep one's sermons a particular length.
Or a big clock facing you in the pulpit.

If in doubt, write it out.  The "ums" that you say while you're trying to remember what wanted to say next can add five minutes.
David Charlton  

Was Algul Siento a divinity school?

Brian Stoffregen

Quote from: Terry W Culler on February 13, 2023, 07:59:07 PM
Quote from: Pilgrim on February 13, 2023, 03:36:05 PM
Quote from: Terry W Culler on February 12, 2023, 05:29:22 PM
Who in the world preaches a 10 minute sermon?  And why would anyone think that was sufficient for the care of souls in their congregation?  Even 20 minutes is barely enough.  Luther said we shouldn't preach more than an hour unless we had something especially important to say!

Having now sat in the pew as retired for a couple of years, I always strove for my sermons to be in the 10-12 minute range. The average lay person's attention span goes dull far more quickly than the average preacher thinks that they are stimulating orators. Good preached is, in my humble and retired opinion, far, far more difficult to find than preachers who think they are good preachers. Just saying!

While I agree that American attention spans are not what they were 60 years ago, they are still generally good enough in my experience to deal with a well laid out and presented 25-30 minute sermon proclaiming Christ's sacrifice for the sinners in the pews.  If all I was going to do was tell them that Christ opened the pathway to heaven confess His Name and believe in their hearts God raised Him from the dead, well I'd just print it in the bulletin, sing a hymn or two, offer a prayer for the church and send them home.  Might take less than 1/2 hour.  I'm sorry brothers but I'm having the feeling some of you have raised the rightly administered Sacrament so high you're neglected the proclamation of the pure Gospel (hope I'm wrong about that)

It doesn't take a long sermon to preach the pure Gospel. In my experience, this story rings true. A well-known speaker was visiting at some gathering. The host asked if he would like to speak to the group. "Well," he said. "If you want me to speak for an hour, I'm ready now. If you want me to speak for 5 minutes, give me an hour to prepare." A well-crafted sermon that takes seriously the biblical text, proclaims the Law (exposing the sins that the text lifts up) and the Gospel (that forgives and gives new life to sinners) takes time to prepare.

In Part III of my exegetical method (the hermenutical part) after translating and studying the text in Greek, I raise the following questions (and seek answers from the text)

III.   What does the text mean to me and my world?
A.   How am I like them? How is my church, my world like theirs?
B.   What questions does this text ask me/us?
C.   How does it understand my/our plight? What's the "bad news" it is addressing?
     1.   What human failure or sin does it expose?
     2.   How does the word pulverize me/us?
     3.   What aspect of my/our lost condition does it speak to? e.g. bondage, sin, guilt, alienation, weakness, darkness, etc.
D.   How is that plight resolved? What's the "good news" in this situation?
     1.   What hope does it give in my/our lost condition?
     2.   How does it heal and make whole? e.g. liberation, cleansing, forgiveness, reconciliation, power, enlightenment, etc.
E.   How is Jesus involved in affecting the resolution?
     1.   How is this solution unique to Christians?
     2.   Where in my/our life/lives does Jesus meet me/us?
F.   What in our world functions in the same way?
     1.   How has the biblical truth been re-enacted in my life or in the life of someone I know?
     2.   What metaphors, images, stories does the text produce?
G.   What differences might it make in my life if I believe this?

The pure gospel certainly comes out of this process - as well as a 12 minute sermon.
I flunked retirement. Serving as a part-time interim in Ferndale, WA.

Brian Stoffregen

Quote from: DCharlton on February 14, 2023, 03:02:48 PM
Quote from: Charles Austin on February 14, 2023, 09:35:25 AM
Word count. Number of printed pages. Eschewing extemporizing. Oral practice.
It ain't rocket surgery to keep one's sermons a particular length.
Or a big clock facing you in the pulpit.

If in doubt, write it out.  The "ums" that you say while you're trying to remember what wanted to say next can add five minutes.

As youths, we were convinced that the lengthy prayer of the church offered by the minister was either recapping what he said in his sermon or adding points he forgot to make. I remember timing one prayer that went 8 minutes.

I write out my sermons. First of all, it lets me know about how long it will be. Secondly, it also helps me weed out stuff that really doesn't move the theme forward. As I posted before, making one point well is sufficient in a sermon. Picking hymns that support that point just adds to the message.

Ten different things that are arranged logically create something more than the sum of their parts. The attached chart shows ten dots in different arrangementds. I suspect that most people see something more than just ten random dots. A well-crafted, logically arranged liturgy creates something more than the sum of the parts - like these ten-dot-shapes.
I flunked retirement. Serving as a part-time interim in Ferndale, WA.

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk