Poll

The pulpit in my Lutheran church is:

At the center of the chancel area.
0 (0%)
On the right side of the chancel (viewed from the nave).
21 (60%)
On the left side of the chancel (viewed from the nave).
10 (28.6%)
A different location.
0 (0%)
There is no pulpit.
4 (11.4%)

Total Members Voted: 35

Author Topic: Lutheran Architecture  (Read 4622 times)

Brian Stoffregen

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Re: Lutheran Architecture
« Reply #225 on: January 22, 2022, 05:04:55 PM »
The American Lutheran Publicity Bureau is a publishing enterprise in the main.  We publish materials for Lutherans and others.   You are publishing materials for Lutheran and others weekly based on the RCIA lessons for the day.  If you don't mind sharing, how many subscribers do you have, and beyond that, how many other "views" and "users" do you estimate are involved with your online publishing enterprise?   What are the trends in that kind of publishing enterprise?  How do you organize it, work to expand it, etc?  It's my belief that you have been a Lutheran person of strong influence in worship and sermon preparation for a lot of people and church leaders across a wide spectrum for a long time.


I have no idea how many folks use my "notes." I have about 600 subscribers that I send them to weekly. I also post them on Facebook where I have about 1300 "friends." Mark Vitalis Hoffman, a professor at United Lutheran Seminary, began posting them on his website, crossmarks.com, many years ago. He told me at one point that he was getting 6000 unique hits a week. (He didn't say how many might have clicked in the link to my notes.) (I've never met Mark. He asked, and I gave him permission to post the notes.) A link to the notes is also part of Textweek.com. There were also quotes from me (that I didn't know about) on an ELCA Youth website.


Beyond all this, I've heard from folks where someone at a pericope study has made copies of my notes and they are shared.


So, I have no idea how far reaching these notes go once I've posted them. They are shared.
"The church … had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

Harvey_Mozolak

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Re: Lutheran Architecture
« Reply #226 on: January 22, 2022, 05:17:16 PM »
what is interesting to see and I am sure Brian has known this is how things on the internet whether posted on a blog or even things emailed to a list of those who have requested materials end up in the hands of folks in foreign countries.  I have a blog that has been very inactive for a couple of years now and people have written me from any number of countries... and my mailing list folks evidently cc others with what I post them... sometimes one wonders if they of foreign places are Christians or people interested in the faith or people who really like poetry or have some other more nefarious reason for corresponding but...   that is the thing with the internet. 
Harvey S. Mozolak
my poetry blog is listed below:

http://lineandletterlettuce.blogspot.com

Brian Stoffregen

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Re: Lutheran Architecture
« Reply #227 on: January 22, 2022, 05:38:39 PM »
You write out of your own particular perspective and chosen world view. Not all of us were theologically trained at Wartburg, nor do we all accept their emphases as the correct method or the best. Seems to me that at times you are in danger of "not seeing the forest for the trees." You examine individual words and differing accounts and emphases but are loath to see how they fit together or what it adds up to. Examining trees is interesting and important. But so is examining the extent, nature, and ecosystem of the whole forest. You also have limited your conversational partners in your theological enterprise to those more your contemporaries (neglecting the Fathers and Confessions) and I suspect also those who are of a more "critical" perspective. You also seem to have an affinity for more speculative interpretations. Would you consult, for example, commentaries from the CPH Concordia Commentary series?

I had to laugh when I read this. In every biblical class I've taught, I encourage the participants to read through the whole book so that they have a view of the "forest" before we look at individual trees.

An analogy I heard and have used is that when botanists dissect a rose, they can better understand all the distinct parts of a rose, but they have also lost the beauty of the rose.

Part One of a workshop I led in Toledo on the Advent/Christmas texts in Matthew, was "Forest." Part Two was "Six Trees."

If you're interested, the six trees were:

Matthew 24:36-44....The Son Will Come and We Don’t Know When (1 Advent)
Matthew 3:1-12........Getting Drenched by the John for the Coming (2 Advent)
Matthew 11:2-11.......Are You Sure He Came? How Do You Know? (3 Advent)
Matthew 1:18-25.......The Genesis of Jesus – A Very Strange Coming! (4 Advent)
Matthew 2:13-23.......He Came! He Leaves! Saving the Savior! (1 Christmas)
Matthew 2:1-12.........Oops! Wrong House; Wrong King! (Epiphany or 2 Christmas)

For me the primary "forest" or "rose" is the book (or author) being studied. There are certainly similarities between  Matthew and Mark, but I see them as different forests or different flowers. Like with forests and flowers there are similarities, but to try and melt them together into one plant the beauty of the rose and the carnation are destroyed.

I do find that canon criticism is interesting; to try and discern why the early believers selected these books and put them in the order that we have them in.

Quote
In Donald Rumsfeld's phrase, we don't know what we don't know. All of us have blind spots some of which we are probably not aware. By limiting yourself to word studies and individual passages, you may blind yourself to perceiving the bigger picture, or even denying that there may be a bigger picture to be perceived. You may find yourself, having limited yourself like one of your favorite blind Hindi, perceiving only a part of the elephant and unaware or in denial that there is a larger whole of which your particular segment is but a part.

To quote Bill Hill (someone none of you know, but a friend of mine; he served in the military, was a manager of a coal mine, and after his studies to become a Roman Catholic deacon). I asked, "What's the most important thing you've learned?" He answered, "I learned how much I don't know."

I'm the one arguing that I am only one of the blind men and that there are many, many others who help contribute to understanding the elephant. I'm not sure that you would say the same thing about yourself.

Quote
Theologians have many tools in their toolbox. Like good craftsmen they will be competent with all of their tools. Typically, like other craftsmen, they will specialize, becoming more skilled with certain tools and certain tasks, and more comfortable working with certain tools. It is, however, a mistake to let our own comfort zone and specialization fool us into thinking that one specialization is the most important and the others can or should be neglected. One may end up with a preference for hammers and start treating everything as nails, even screws. Or perfecting the fashioning of individual parts and never assembling or applying the finish and upholstery to the whole chair.

Exactly! And when one sees himself as part of a huge gathering of good craftsmen, each with their specialties, I don't have to become a systematic or confessional theologian. Others are much better at it than I am. I have yet to be in a pericope study group where anyone else studied the Gospel from the Greek (and I was doing that before I started sending out my "notes" about 30 years ago).

I learned early on in my ministry that I couldn't afford every book on every topic that I was interested in or that was applicable to pastoring a congregation. I concentrated my spending and reading on commentaries, usually buying and reading two new commentaries on the main gospel for that year. I have about 30 commentaries on the Gospel of Luke. (I also concentrated on worship and music stuff, too. I specialized in piano music and arranging for guitar. I know enough about organs to know that I'm not qualified to play one.)
"The church … had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

Brian Stoffregen

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Re: Lutheran Architecture
« Reply #228 on: January 22, 2022, 05:43:11 PM »
what is interesting to see and I am sure Brian has known this is how things on the internet whether posted on a blog or even things emailed to a list of those who have requested materials end up in the hands of folks in foreign countries.  I have a blog that has been very inactive for a couple of years now and people have written me from any number of countries... and my mailing list folks evidently cc others with what I post them... sometimes one wonders if they of foreign places are Christians or people interested in the faith or people who really like poetry or have some other more nefarious reason for corresponding but...   that is the thing with the internet.


When I've been at workshops or conferences and someone recognizes my name because of my "notes," I usually ask how they get them. Most common was from the Crossmarks.com site. (I don't know how often he updates them with the revisions I do each week.) With a couple of clicks folks can forward an e-mail, or share a Facebook post.
"The church … had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

Dave Benke

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Re: Lutheran Architecture
« Reply #229 on: January 22, 2022, 05:55:00 PM »
what is interesting to see and I am sure Brian has known this is how things on the internet whether posted on a blog or even things emailed to a list of those who have requested materials end up in the hands of folks in foreign countries.  I have a blog that has been very inactive for a couple of years now and people have written me from any number of countries... and my mailing list folks evidently cc others with what I post them... sometimes one wonders if they of foreign places are Christians or people interested in the faith or people who really like poetry or have some other more nefarious reason for corresponding but...   that is the thing with the internet.

This is very true, Harvey, and cuts across the various social media from print/poetry/studies to live-streaming, video, music, etc.  One of the congregations in Queens, very multi-cultural in approach, has headed or is headed to Germany because some folks over there watched the Queens congregation's online offerings and ended up, after instruction and discernment, desiring to be baptized. 

The reach of Brian's studies on the lessons is, I'm sure, international, and from what I'm reading, without him making a big deal out of it or monetizing it.  It's a gift.

Dave Benke

Harvey_Mozolak

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Re: Lutheran Architecture
« Reply #230 on: January 22, 2022, 06:33:32 PM »
I must say this for all the flak that Brian gets in these parts... I started reading his notes quite a few years back in the days when I wrote a weekly or more sermon and as prep read not only book bound commentaries but also a couple of internet sources or was it a mailing of Brian's (I forget)...  (by the way I also really enjoy the LCMS former prof and pastor Phil Brandt from the left coast offerings to this day).  I tried/still try my hand in SERmondays and now HarVerse mailings because of efforts like these that I appreciated. My stuff is no where near scholarly and laced too much with the poetic.   And I must say that in the days when I read Brian's notes with religious regularity I did not find them to be outlandishly liberal or way out or un-Lutheran, or purposely destructive of the Faith or deceptive.  I find myself wondering sometimes when people (not just Brian) say a word means this or that or that some practice is relevant to this or that period in biblical times, how they really know it is true or certain... but hey, how did Kretzman(n?) know when he was writing his green bound set?  I think very few are the folks who really dig around in the potshards and parchment fragments and who can speak, read and write in the original tongues like it was their mother-tongue.   It is also true that sometimes (well more than that) we are attacking and arguing with Brian before we really listen to what he is saying and the purpose seems IMO less to find out the truth of a matter than to pin him to a wall we have constructed. 
Harvey S. Mozolak
my poetry blog is listed below:

http://lineandletterlettuce.blogspot.com