Author Topic: What Happened to the Christian/Lutheran Cyclopedia?  (Read 1566 times)

Harvey_Mozolak

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Re: What Happened to the Christian/Lutheran Cyclopedia?
« Reply #30 on: December 22, 2021, 09:20:14 AM »
I know reference was made to Pfatteicher's 2 pages...  and not sure where those referenced pages are because his Commentary on the LBW has 14 pages of details.  I have also enjoyed using Jeffery Rowthorn's two volumes of/on litanies The Wideness of God's Mercy, pages 21-25 has a number (6) of variations and dozens of other Litanies, both good and not so helpful.  Both the Anglicans and Episcopalians have Commentaries on their BOCP (both went with my libraries demise at retirement) but I am sure they would have some info that might be additional to the Pfatteicher stuff on the LBW.  In SWPa Synod of the ELCA we used to use the Litany in procession, mostly outside, from meeting room building to church nave as the entrance to the morning Maundy Thursday Eucharist which included the blessing of oils for synod parishes and the renewal of ordination vows (if you can feature the renewal of any vow; I might favor a sacred remembrance of a vow). 
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John_Hannah

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Re: What Happened to the Christian/Lutheran Cyclopedia?
« Reply #31 on: December 22, 2021, 09:21:50 AM »
I'm seeking to learn more about the Great Litany. Does anyone know of a commentary on its parts? I found some online material referring to Pfattacher. Does he go through it part by part?

He has two pages on the Great Litany.

Peace, JOHN

Thank you. That sounds like a good start but I'll probably seek more. I'm trying to understand the history of the text and its organization.

Luther Dottier Reed probably has more; I no longer have mine.
Pr. JOHN HANNAH, STS

Rev. Edward Engelbrecht

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Re: What Happened to the Christian/Lutheran Cyclopedia?
« Reply #32 on: December 22, 2021, 09:44:19 AM »
Grateful for resources, gentlemen. Thank you! This is why I participate on ALPB. Most helpful.
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D. Engebretson

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Re: What Happened to the Christian/Lutheran Cyclopedia?
« Reply #33 on: December 22, 2021, 09:57:05 AM »
I didn't see much in Reed with regard to the Litany, but you may want to also check Tim Maschke's book Gathered Guests from CPH.  Pages 417-420.

Dom Gregory Dix's The Shape of the Liturgy has some entries as well, and may be a good source of background.
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Brian Stoffregen

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Re: What Happened to the Christian/Lutheran Cyclopedia?
« Reply #34 on: December 22, 2021, 04:59:49 PM »
I've included the following outline when I've used it.
THE GREAT LITANY
   The LITANY is probably new to most of you. It is not a prayer that we use very often. However, it is the most ancient of Christian services except for Holy Communion. Martin Luther regarded the LITANY as next to the Lord’s Prayer the very best that has come to earth.
   Christians have been using and enjoying this prayer for over 1900 years. To help you understand and appreciate this responsive prayer, the following is an outline of its contents:
Introduction
   Three-fold Kyrie (“Lord”)
   “O Christ hear us”
   Invocation of the persons of the Trinity
   Plea for grace
Three Deprecations (from deprecari, to avert by prayer) against evils and dangers. The response to these petitions is: “Good Lord, deliver us.”
Three Obsecrations (from obsecrare, to ask on religious grounds) lay the foundations on which the prayer is built. The response to these petitions is: “Help us, good Lord.”
The Supplications or prayers for ourselves are brief and included in one petition. The response to this petition is: “Save us, good Lord.”
The Confession is a one-line prayer expressing our unworthiness. It acts as a bridge between the prayers for ourselves and the prayers for others.
The Intercessions on behalf of others are the largest part of the Litany. There are five sections, each with the response, “We implore you to hear us good Lord.”
     Prayers for the church
     Prayers for the support of the weak
     Prayers for the nations
     Prayers for all sorts and conditions of humanity
     Prayers for reconciliation with our enemies and with the natural world
Conclusion
   A plea for Christ to hear
   Agnus Dei (“Lamb of God”)
   “O Christ hear us”
   Three-fold Kyrie (“Lord”)

"The church … had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

George Rahn

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Re: What Happened to the Christian/Lutheran Cyclopedia?
« Reply #35 on: December 22, 2021, 05:53:48 PM »
I've included the following outline when I've used it.
THE GREAT LITANY
   The LITANY is probably new to most of you. It is not a prayer that we use very often. However, it is the most ancient of Christian services except for Holy Communion. Martin Luther regarded the LITANY as next to the Lord’s Prayer the very best that has come to earth.
   Christians have been using and enjoying this prayer for over 1900 years. To help you understand and appreciate this responsive prayer, the following is an outline of its contents:
Introduction
   Three-fold Kyrie (“Lord”)
   “O Christ hear us”
   Invocation of the persons of the Trinity
   Plea for grace
Three Deprecations (from deprecari, to avert by prayer) against evils and dangers. The response to these petitions is: “Good Lord, deliver us.”
Three Obsecrations (from obsecrare, to ask on religious grounds) lay the foundations on which the prayer is built. The response to these petitions is: “Help us, good Lord.”
The Supplications or prayers for ourselves are brief and included in one petition. The response to this petition is: “Save us, good Lord.”
The Confession is a one-line prayer expressing our unworthiness. It acts as a bridge between the prayers for ourselves and the prayers for others.
The Intercessions on behalf of others are the largest part of the Litany. There are five sections, each with the response, “We implore you to hear us good Lord.”
     Prayers for the church
     Prayers for the support of the weak
     Prayers for the nations
     Prayers for all sorts and conditions of humanity
     Prayers for reconciliation with our enemies and with the natural world
Conclusion
   A plea for Christ to hear
   Agnus Dei (“Lamb of God”)
   “O Christ hear us”
   Three-fold Kyrie (“Lord”)

This is most helpful.  Thanks

Rev. Edward Engelbrecht

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Re: What Happened to the Christian/Lutheran Cyclopedia?
« Reply #36 on: December 22, 2021, 06:25:54 PM »
Thanks again, folks. I've found additional insights in Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church and Luther's Works, vol. 53.
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