Author Topic: Fascinating black LCMS history at the Federalist  (Read 518 times)

peter_speckhard

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Fascinating black LCMS history at the Federalist
« on: November 22, 2021, 08:26:28 PM »
https://thefederalist.com/2021/11/22/history-making-african-american-eulogized-in-a-church-that-turned-her-away-82-years-ago/

What a poignant story of redemption. She went to a Lutheran church and was not allowed to be seen, and since there were no other Lutheran churches around, she started one that is still active today. The church that turned her away all those years ago, though, was honored to host her funeral.

Dave Benke

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Re: Fascinating black LCMS history at the Federalist
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2021, 09:25:57 PM »
https://thefederalist.com/2021/11/22/history-making-african-american-eulogized-in-a-church-that-turned-her-away-82-years-ago/

What a poignant story of redemption. She went to a Lutheran church and was not allowed to be seen, and since there were no other Lutheran churches around, she started one that is still active today. The church that turned her away all those years ago, though, was honored to host her funeral.

Trinity Lutheran Houston, called Downtown Trinity due to its location, is, for non-Missouri readers, a congregation of significance in our denomination, having given to the wider church two Synodical Presidents, John W. Behnken and Oliver Harms.  In a sense it's a story of redemption for the congregation in the reception of this woman of determination and faith.

Dave Benke

Michael Slusser

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Re: Fascinating black LCMS history at the Federalist
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2021, 09:45:46 PM »
https://thefederalist.com/2021/11/22/history-making-african-american-eulogized-in-a-church-that-turned-her-away-82-years-ago/

What a poignant story of redemption. She went to a Lutheran church and was not allowed to be seen, and since there were no other Lutheran churches around, she started one that is still active today. The church that turned her away all those years ago, though, was honored to host her funeral.
Wonderful story, wonderful woman!

Peace,
Michael
Fr. Michael Slusser
Retired Roman Catholic priest and theologian

J. Thomas Shelley

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Re: Fascinating black LCMS history at the Federalist
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2021, 10:23:16 PM »
Quote

She loved her family, whose faith reflected their grounding in hers, heard in the solo offered by her great-great grandson, Averri LeMalle, II, and the words of her great-granddaughter, Kionna W. LeMalle, who shared Green’s last words: “Bless the Lord, O my soul and all that is within me, bless His Holy name."


Chysostoma!  AXIOS!

Gives me chills.

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Served as a Lutheran Pastor October 31, 1989 - October 31, 2014.
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peterm

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Re: Fascinating black LCMS history at the Federalist
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2021, 11:34:22 AM »
Thank you for sharing this wonderful story.
Rev. Peter Morlock- ELCA pastor serving two congregations in WIS

Dave Likeness

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Re: Fascinating black LCMS history at the Federalist
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2021, 11:45:36 AM »
A classmate of mine at Concordia Jr. College in Milwaukee
came from that ministerial family tree of Lutheran pastors.
His name was Harvey J. Lehman, the son of a Lutheran
pastor.  He is was one of two Black classmates who went
to Milwaukee for the first two college years and graduated
in 1961.  Neither one of them went to the Senior College
at Fort Wayne.

peter_speckhard

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Re: Fascinating black LCMS history at the Federalist
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2021, 12:42:55 PM »
My dad graduated from Valpo in '52 and immediately took a teaching job at the new Houston Lutheran High. At one Lutheran event of some kind, I think a BBQ fundraiser, he saw an African-American pastor sitting by himself. Being from Wisconsin and not knowing the ways of the locals, my dad went over and sat with him. He said it made that pastor so uncomfortable that he excused himself. People later told my dad that he shouldn't have done that because it wasn't fair to put that pastor in such an awkward position.

Because he was single with lots of free time and was the football coach, his weekend entertainment featured lots of high school football games. All segregated teams, but the stands were not segregated. So my dad went to a lot of the games between "Colored" teams and never had any problem. THe white and black teams used the same stadiums at different times. Segregation was so baked in that it just never even came up. But he was in Houston for four years and said that apart from standard greetings he never had an actual conversation with a black person after that first attempt at the church picnic. It just never came up. The school was all white, his church was all white, and in mixed public settings everyone was cordial but everyone just knew that you didn't go beyond cordial with the other race. My dad said that at the time he was just too much of an outsider to even get it, much less press any questions about it. It was just the way things were. He told that story often in his later years and I think it was one of his big regrets that he didn't know what to do or how to do it. He loved his time at the school and liked Houston well enough, but he knew early on he'd never "take" in the South and would not be settling down there long term. I don't think Houston Lutheran High would have admitted students from the black congregation founded by the woman in this article. And I don't think that fact outraged my dad at the time so much as it made him feel like he was out of his element in Houston.     

Charles Austin

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Re: Fascinating black LCMS history at the Federalist
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2021, 04:12:51 PM »
Elements of that systemic racism continued into the 60s, even in the north.
Retired ELCA Pastor. You can say liberal Christians are wrong. You can say that you disagree with our interpretation of faith. But when you say we are driven by “culture” or “trendiness,” you prove that you do not listen to us. Luther fared better with Rome.

Dave Likeness

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Re: Fascinating black LCMS history at the Federalist
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2021, 06:06:21 PM »
In 1955, Davenport High School in Davenport, Iowa was the state football
champs and went  undefeated.   The starting quarterback was black as was
one of the starting half-backs.  This city of 100,000 was proud to support its
high school sports programs.  There was no racial unrest in the 1950's for
the city of Davenport.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2021, 06:16:14 PM by Dave Likeness »