Author Topic: accidental overdose/suicide  (Read 1263 times)

peter_speckhard

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accidental overdose/suicide
« on: November 17, 2021, 02:07:48 PM »
https://townhall.com/tipsheet/spencerbrown/2021/11/17/drug-overdose-deaths-n2599225

Young people especially seem to be dying in record numbers. Last weekend my wife went to the wake of our neighbor's son-in-law, who had young children, who died of suicide/overside. I did the wake for a 28-year-old relative of a member who died of suicide/overdose, then in church the next day was a young man and former member who came home after his 28-year-old wife died of suicide/overdose. (It isn't always 100% clear whether the overdoses were intentional). In our fifth grade we have as many students who have lost a parent to overdose as we have students who live with both parents.

The drift away from church by the younger generation has accompanied a complete loss of a sense of meaning, purpose, and direction. This is why political activism and climate activism are taking on the characteristics of religion; something has to fill the void, or else nothing will and the end will be drugging oneself into oblivion.   

Dave Likeness

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Re: accidental overdose/suicide
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2021, 03:05:20 PM »
In the journal First Things (December 2021) R.R.Reno states that according
to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention: "nearly 100,000 people died
from overdoses in 2020."  He goes on to state that drug overdose has killed
nearly one million people since 1999. Reno sadly concludes by saying  our policy
 in response to this drug over dose tragedy has been to legalize marijuana.

Dan Fienen

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Re: accidental overdose/suicide
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2021, 03:16:55 PM »
Another aspect of this overdose/suicide epidemic is that for many the entrance into the world of drug addiction is poorly managed prescription meds. Opioids are legitimately prescribed for an injury, surgery, etc. and then poorly supervised. Either the person become addicted to the pain meds directly and then their withdrawal is poorly managed, or the opioids are withdrawn too soon and the person seeks replacements and they become addicted.


The downward spiral into addiction, obtaining the drugs illicitly, and the dubious quality of those illicit drugs can lead to despair or accidental overdose.
Pr. Daniel Fienen
LCMS

Rev. Edward Engelbrecht

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Re: accidental overdose/suicide
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2021, 03:18:07 PM »
https://townhall.com/tipsheet/spencerbrown/2021/11/17/drug-overdose-deaths-n2599225

Young people especially seem to be dying in record numbers. Last weekend my wife went to the wake of our neighbor's son-in-law, who had young children, who died of suicide/overside. I did the wake for a 28-year-old relative of a member who died of suicide/overdose, then in church the next day was a young man and former member who came home after his 28-year-old wife died of suicide/overdose. (It isn't always 100% clear whether the overdoses were intentional). In our fifth grade we have as many students who have lost a parent to overdose as we have students who live with both parents.

The drift away from church by the younger generation has accompanied a complete loss of a sense of meaning, purpose, and direction. This is why political activism and climate activism are taking on the characteristics of religion; something has to fill the void, or else nothing will and the end will be drugging oneself into oblivion.

There is very bad fentanyl on the streets these days. Even very experienced users are overdosing. I'm doing a non-member service this week. Lord, have mercy. Christ, have mercy. Lord, have mercy. Amen.
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J. Thomas Shelley

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Re: accidental overdose/suicide
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2021, 04:02:04 PM »
Too many  olks' jobs were decreed "non-essential" by too many State Governors during the lockdowns of Spring 2020.

Telling ANYONE that they are disposable, expendable, and of little consequence because they are arbitrarily "non-essential" is crushing to their self esteem....and virtually ensures that few will want to enter a trade of profession with such an unstable and uncertain future.

The OD/suicide spike was much more avoidable than COVID exposure.

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Donald_Kirchner

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Re: accidental overdose/suicide
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2021, 04:12:31 PM »
https://townhall.com/tipsheet/spencerbrown/2021/11/17/drug-overdose-deaths-n2599225

Young people especially seem to be dying in record numbers. Last weekend my wife went to the wake of our neighbor's son-in-law, who had young children, who died of suicide/overside. I did the wake for a 28-year-old relative of a member who died of suicide/overdose, then in church the next day was a young man and former member who came home after his 28-year-old wife died of suicide/overdose. (It isn't always 100% clear whether the overdoses were intentional). In our fifth grade we have as many students who have lost a parent to overdose as we have students who live with both parents.

The drift away from church by the younger generation has accompanied a complete loss of a sense of meaning, purpose, and direction. This is why political activism and climate activism are taking on the characteristics of religion; something has to fill the void, or else nothing will and the end will be drugging oneself into oblivion.

There is very bad fentanyl on the streets these days. Even very experienced users are overdosing. I'm doing a non-member service this week. Lord, have mercy. Christ, have mercy. Lord, have mercy. Amen.

Yup, thatís a major reason, all the fentanyl coming from Mexico.
Don Kirchner

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Rob Morris

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Re: accidental overdose/suicide
« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2021, 05:39:29 PM »
As part of confirmation classes now, I caution the students that growing up in the 80s and 90s, an overdose was an obvious and preventable mistake. Nowadays, with all of the synthetically produced and (obviously) unregulated illegal drugs, one dose can kill you. Obviously, the message was always anti-drug, but especially so now. The first time you experiment could be the last thing you do.

Dave Benke

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Re: accidental overdose/suicide
« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2021, 06:07:40 PM »
As part of confirmation classes now, I caution the students that growing up in the 80s and 90s, an overdose was an obvious and preventable mistake. Nowadays, with all of the synthetically produced and (obviously) unregulated illegal drugs, one dose can kill you. Obviously, the message was always anti-drug, but especially so now. The first time you experiment could be the last thing you do.

Excellent addition to the conversation on the first article as well as the fifth commandment. 

Self-care - related to self-esteem - has been, not by the way, a historic bugaboo for church workers.  More workers than we'd like to believe succumb to substance abuse, and keep trying to care for others when their own self-care has gone away and the various sources of pain have been numbed in unhealthy ways.

Dave Benke

Rev. Edward Engelbrecht

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Re: accidental overdose/suicide
« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2021, 06:34:02 PM »
As part of confirmation classes now, I caution the students that growing up in the 80s and 90s, an overdose was an obvious and preventable mistake. Nowadays, with all of the synthetically produced and (obviously) unregulated illegal drugs, one dose can kill you. Obviously, the message was always anti-drug, but especially so now. The first time you experiment could be the last thing you do.

Excellent addition to the conversation on the first article as well as the fifth commandment. 

Self-care - related to self-esteem - has been, not by the way, a historic bugaboo for church workers.  More workers than we'd like to believe succumb to substance abuse, and keep trying to care for others when their own self-care has gone away and the various sources of pain have been numbed in unhealthy ways.

Dave Benke

Yes. That's what I did with our catechumens on Fifth Commandment. I asked if this was talked about in schools. One student was aware of the Dare Program and others said they were not being taught about the dangers of drugs. I was astonished. There are so many users here. God have pity on these children.
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peter_speckhard

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Re: accidental overdose/suicide
« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2021, 07:10:43 PM »
As part of confirmation classes now, I caution the students that growing up in the 80s and 90s, an overdose was an obvious and preventable mistake. Nowadays, with all of the synthetically produced and (obviously) unregulated illegal drugs, one dose can kill you. Obviously, the message was always anti-drug, but especially so now. The first time you experiment could be the last thing you do.

Excellent addition to the conversation on the first article as well as the fifth commandment. 

Self-care - related to self-esteem - has been, not by the way, a historic bugaboo for church workers.  More workers than we'd like to believe succumb to substance abuse, and keep trying to care for others when their own self-care has gone away and the various sources of pain have been numbed in unhealthy ways.

Dave Benke

Yes. That's what I did with our catechumens on Fifth Commandment. I asked if this was talked about in schools. One student was aware of the Dare Program and others said they were not being taught about the dangers of drugs. I was astonished. There are so many users here. God have pity on these children.
We have a very active DARE program led by a police officer who is excellent with the kids. They do a long unit in 5th and 8 grade. They also take upper class Munster High School kids who graduated from St. Paulís out of class to come meet with the St. Paulís kids for a class on the challenges of high school. It isnít a cure-all by any stretch, but I think it makes a big difference even if all it does is establish a good relationship with the officer. The kids love the officer that runs the program.

peter_speckhard

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Re: accidental overdose/suicide
« Reply #10 on: November 18, 2021, 09:05:59 AM »
https://www.cnn.com/2021/11/17/politics/fentanyl-overdose-deaths-what-matters/index.html

According to this article, fentanyl as a pain killer is 50-100 times more powerful than morphine. I don't know how they measure that, but I know a carefully controlled environment is the only place fentanyl would not be terribly dangerous, and it is flooding the US from China via Mexico.

This article focuses on the danger of accidental overdose. I know this is a problem in the foster system. Parents with drug problems are common, of course, but usually they are perfectly capable of visiting their children without a problem. But now many other street drugs come laced with fentanyl whether the user knows it or not. That means a drug user with trace amounts of powder on his clothes could hug his daughter and accidentally kill her because of how little fentanyl it takes to potentially kill a child. So what in the past would have been temporary separations and reunification aided by increasing visitations as the parents get their lives together can now sometimes become long term separations. That's because the process of gradual visitation is interrupted-- everything has to be supervised and they can't go on to the unsupervised stage. That causes a lot of anger and depression that also gets treated with drugs and the process of reunification starts to go backwards. But the state can't risk being responsible for letting children in its care die of preventable fentanyl overdoses, and even casual drug-using parents can't know whether there might be fentanyl in their their drug of choice. So the fentanyl epidemic is also crushing the foster system in many places.

Mark Brown

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Re: accidental overdose/suicide
« Reply #11 on: November 18, 2021, 09:34:45 AM »
If we actually had control of our Southern border instead of letting China wage war against us by giving the fentanyl to MS13 that brings it across in the midst of the chaos currently allowed.  It wouldn't stop all of it.  You couldn't attack in this way if the populace had the virtue to say no in larger numbers.  But it is just another failure of our corrupt leadership. One of the easy things they could do and a chief part of the vocation to "insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, and promote the general Welfare." But they'd rather side with China and non-Americans. Who exactly are the traitors?

James S. Rustad

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Re: accidental overdose/suicide
« Reply #12 on: November 18, 2021, 01:33:03 PM »
We have a very active DARE program led by a police officer who is excellent with the kids. They do a long unit in 5th and 8 grade. They also take upper class Munster High School kids who graduated from St. Paulís out of class to come meet with the St. Paulís kids for a class on the challenges of high school. It isnít a cure-all by any stretch, but I think it makes a big difference even if all it does is establish a good relationship with the officer. The kids love the officer that runs the program.

When my son was in school I kept him out of DARE.  Why?  Because the only science on the subject showed that males who had completed DARE were more likely to use recreational drugs than those who had not completed DARE.  The results of the study were statistically significant.  DARE changed their program shortly after that.  I have not seen any science on how the newer DARE program works.

peter_speckhard

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Re: accidental overdose/suicide
« Reply #13 on: November 18, 2021, 01:53:29 PM »
We have a very active DARE program led by a police officer who is excellent with the kids. They do a long unit in 5th and 8 grade. They also take upper class Munster High School kids who graduated from St. Paulís out of class to come meet with the St. Paulís kids for a class on the challenges of high school. It isnít a cure-all by any stretch, but I think it makes a big difference even if all it does is establish a good relationship with the officer. The kids love the officer that runs the program.

When my son was in school I kept him out of DARE.  Why?  Because the only science on the subject showed that males who had completed DARE were more likely to use recreational drugs than those who had not completed DARE.  The results of the study were statistically significant.  DARE changed their program shortly after that.  I have not seen any science on how the newer DARE program works.
I've never heard of that before. The DARE program probably spends as much time on peer pressure generally as it does on the specifics of what one's high school peers might pressure them into. A lot on social media bullying and that kind of thing, too, so maybe they have changed it significantly.

It could be, as it seems to be with many sex ed programs, that giving information to those who might otherwise lack it opens doors that wouldn't otherwise be there at all. Or it could be that DARE programs were being offered especially in places where they thought the message was needed, and places where drugs weren't a big issue didn't bother with the program, so the correlation wasn't cause-effect. I don't really know what the success rate is among our DARE program graduates compared to others or compared to what it would have been without the DARE program.

RevG

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Re: accidental overdose/suicide
« Reply #14 on: November 18, 2021, 02:26:17 PM »
We have a very active DARE program led by a police officer who is excellent with the kids. They do a long unit in 5th and 8 grade. They also take upper class Munster High School kids who graduated from St. Paulís out of class to come meet with the St. Paulís kids for a class on the challenges of high school. It isnít a cure-all by any stretch, but I think it makes a big difference even if all it does is establish a good relationship with the officer. The kids love the officer that runs the program.

When my son was in school I kept him out of DARE.  Why?  Because the only science on the subject showed that males who had completed DARE were more likely to use recreational drugs than those who had not completed DARE.  The results of the study were statistically significant.  DARE changed their program shortly after that.  I have not seen any science on how the newer DARE program works.
I've never heard of that before. The DARE program probably spends as much time on peer pressure generally as it does on the specifics of what one's high school peers might pressure them into. A lot on social media bullying and that kind of thing, too, so maybe they have changed it significantly.

It could be, as it seems to be with many sex ed programs, that giving information to those who might otherwise lack it opens doors that wouldn't otherwise be there at all. Or it could be that DARE programs were being offered especially in places where they thought the message was needed, and places where drugs weren't a big issue didn't bother with the program, so the correlation wasn't cause-effect. I don't really know what the success rate is among our DARE program graduates compared to others or compared to what it would have been without the DARE program.

Yes, from what I understand DARE is considered to be a failure. I didn't even think it was a thing anymore until you mentioned it here, Peter. I'm trying to recall where I read that but I believe it has to do with the fact that the program never focused on the underlying issues of addiction which are related to trauma, connection, and meaning. I remember going through it when I was 13 and I recall most of us in the class thinking it was a joke. Based on personal experience (from having a best friend who was an addict for many years and became addicted to opioids and decided to take his life two years ago) I believe the seeds of addictive behavior are sown very early on in our culture. In large part, the opioid crisis is a representation of the loss of meaning that has occurred via the deindustrialization of America. In many respects, this has been going on in the ghettos of America for decades. Journalist Chris Hedges has done extensive work on this for a while now. Johan Hari's "Lost Connections" and "Chasing the Scream" are good works for understanding what is happening. I would also recommend a viewing of the show The Wire.