Author Topic: The Fracturing of Evangelicalism  (Read 533 times)

Jim Butler

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The Fracturing of Evangelicalism
« on: July 13, 2021, 07:19:26 PM »
The significance of the passage of time, right? The significance of the passage of time. So when you think about it, there is great significance to the passage of time. -- VP Kamala Harris

Terry W Culler

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Re: The Fracturing of Evangelicalism
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2021, 07:47:49 PM »
I thought this was an interesting article.

https://mereorthodoxy.com/six-way-fracturing-evangelicalism/#R548111-ecb96e90-C5BW67JQ


One of the interesting things about evangelicalism is the difficulty in actually defining what it is.  Evangelicals will have a "high" view of Scripture, yet divide over the details.  They believe in conversion, but the meaning of that term changes from subset to subset.  They believe in evangelism and that is pretty standard but, like many others, they can sometimes be iffy on what world missions should be.  The one thing they all share, in so far as I can tell, is crucicentric view of Christ's atoning sacrifice.

What I think is driving the current fracturing of this self identification as evangelicals is the willingness of some to go along with anything a certain politician or party wants as long as they are good on a small number of "super issues" like abortion and religious freedom.  Abortion has been the devil's great tool for dividing orthodox Christians because many if not most such joined the Republican party because of it.  Prior to Ronald Reagan more evangelicals were Democrats than Republicans.  Since then the flood went the other way.  What was lost was any influence orthodox Christians could have had in the Democratic Party.  But now some are not so sure that an (R) after someone's name necessarily means friendly to Christian beliefs and, if they haven't yet jumped out of the wagon, they're just standing on the bumper.

Is there really a way forward as Tim Keller suggests.  I'm not so sure there is for modern American style evangelicalism as it has existed at least since Billy Graham's Los Angeles crusade of 1947.  But God has promised that His Church can not defeated and He will work it all out.
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Rev. Edward Engelbrecht

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Re: The Fracturing of Evangelicalism
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2021, 09:58:41 PM »
I serve as administrator for www.churchhistoryreview.org.