Author Topic: Sermongate  (Read 2550 times)

Dan Fienen

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Re: Sermongate
« Reply #45 on: July 14, 2021, 11:09:17 AM »
One could in introducing a factoid mention in passing the book or speaker that is the source. Not a full bibliographic reference but an indication of where it came from.


When I use illustrations or anecdotes from sermon resources, I will frequently say something like, "I read a story that . . ." or "a pastor was . . ." or something similar. One should never pass of the experiences of others as ones own.
Pr. Daniel Fienen
LCMS

Brian Stoffregen

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Re: Sermongate
« Reply #46 on: July 14, 2021, 01:42:51 PM »
A retired Baptist minister's letter was  published by the Times:  "When serving a church whose congregation included theological scholars, I wrestled with whether, or how, to identity the sources of my references without punctuating my sermons with verbal footnotes.  Seeking. the counsel of one of the scholars, I was told, 'Most people don't mind learning that their pastor has read a book.' "


While, like Dan Fienen, I note when preaching that something came from another source, without giving verbal footnotes; but I do put footnotes in the manuscript so in future years, I will know where the quote came from. The footnotes also appear in the copies that are available.
"The church had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

Dan Fienen

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Re: Sermongate
« Reply #47 on: July 21, 2021, 02:34:19 PM »
Another benefit that I have found in using sermon helps, like Concordia Pulpit Resources, Concordia Pulpit, or prepared sermon outlines from the seminary journals, is that because I have preferred ways of approaching texts and constructing sermons, I can get into a rut. Looking and learning from others how they approach a text can give me fresh insights and approaches. Helps keep the sermon from being just the same old thing.
Pr. Daniel Fienen
LCMS

Dave Benke

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Re: Sermongate
« Reply #48 on: July 21, 2021, 02:55:27 PM »
Another benefit that I have found in using sermon helps, like Concordia Pulpit Resources, Concordia Pulpit, or prepared sermon outlines from the seminary journals, is that because I have preferred ways of approaching texts and constructing sermons, I can get into a rut. Looking and learning from others how they approach a text can give me fresh insights and approaches. Helps keep the sermon from being just the same old thing.

Excellent point, Dan.  The other part of it is that (as one who has preached in one location for a long, long time), people are used to what you preach being preached in a certain way which is your certain way.  When you deviate, they either go
thanks for changing - about time, or
please don't do that again, I like the other way

When I did sermons through outlines on slides/powerpoint for a month, the reaction was "thanks, but please go back to your conversational style."  Huh.  I kind of liked the specificity of the powerpoint, but went back to my old ways.

Dave Benke


Dan Fienen

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Re: Sermongate
« Reply #49 on: July 21, 2021, 03:11:24 PM »
I have striven to use a conversational style for all that I typically use some sort of outline to make sure I don't just rambflues. get all the important points in. One of my early inspirations was watching Johnny Carson monologs for his relaxed presentation and handling flubs.
Pr. Daniel Fienen
LCMS