Author Topic: Definition of Occuli  (Read 1411 times)

Jeremy Loesch

  • ALPB Contribution Leader
  • *****
  • Posts: 2247
    • View Profile
Definition of Occuli
« on: February 08, 2021, 11:22:23 AM »
Hello friends.  A simple request- what is the definition of Occuli, which is the title of the Third Sunday in Lent?  I've been duckduckgoing it and have not had much success. 

The Introit for that day is Psalm 69- Zeal for your house has consumed me...  The Gospel lesson is John 2, the clearing of the temple. 

Thanks.  Jeremy
A Lutheran pastor growing into all sorts of things.

John_Hannah

  • ALPB Contribution Leader
  • *****
  • Posts: 5436
    • View Profile
Re: Definition of Occuli
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2021, 11:53:49 AM »
Hello friends.  A simple request- what is the definition of Occuli, which is the title of the Third Sunday in Lent?  I've been duckduckgoing it and have not had much success. 

The Introit for that day is Psalm 69- Zeal for your house has consumed me...  The Gospel lesson is John 2, the clearing of the temple. 

Thanks.  Jeremy

Originally the introit was, "Mine eyes are ever toward the Lord. . . ." Oculi = "eyes".  (from the TLH)

Peace, JOHN
Pr. JOHN HANNAH, STS

J. Thomas Shelley

  • ALPB Contribution Leader
  • *****
  • Posts: 4062
    • View Profile
Re: Definition of Occuli
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2021, 12:30:29 PM »
In some three year Lectionaries (LBW Cycle A, for one) the Gospel for Third Sunday in Lent is the healing of the man born blind, John 9....a subtle connection to the traditional title.
Greek Orthodox-Ecumenical Patriarchate

Baptized, Confirmed, and Ordained United Methodist.
Served as a Lutheran Pastor October 31, 1989 - October 31, 2014.
Charter member of the first chapter of the Society of the Holy Trinity.

Chrismated Antiochian Orthodox, eve of Mary of Egypt Sunday, A.D. 2015

Weedon

  • Guest
Re: Definition of Occuli
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2021, 01:46:49 PM »
As John said: the Antiphon for the day is from Psalm 25 in the Vulgate,

15 Oculi mei semper ad Dominum,
quoniam ipse evellet de laqueo pedes meos.
16 Respice in me, et miserere mei,
quia unicus et pauper sum ego.

My eyes are ever toward the Lord,
For he will pluck my feet out of the net.
Turn to me and be gracious to me,
For I am lonely and afflicted.

Jeremy_Loesch

  • ALPB Forum Member
  • **
  • Posts: 96
    • View Profile
Re: Definition of Occuli
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2021, 04:23:01 PM »
So what do I do in Year B? Maybe I'll swap out the original introit.

Jeremy

Weedon

  • Guest
Re: Definition of Occuli
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2021, 04:24:04 PM »
I’d suggest sub out years A, B, and C with 1 Year. :)

Jeremy_Loesch

  • ALPB Forum Member
  • **
  • Posts: 96
    • View Profile
Re: Definition of Occuli
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2021, 07:36:39 PM »
I kind of thought you'd say that Will. One of these years...

I have thought about going to the 1 year for a whole 3 year cycle. I'm sitting on a fence. And I don't think the congregation would care much either way.

Jeremy

J. Thomas Shelley

  • ALPB Contribution Leader
  • *****
  • Posts: 4062
    • View Profile
Re: Definition of Occuli
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2021, 08:56:08 PM »
In my former life as a Lutheran I was a staunch advocate of the three year lectionary, pre-Revised Common.

The Orthodox Church uses as one year lectionary; however, the Sunday Epistle sometimes varies from the prescribed sequence depending on the Saint(s) Commemorated that day; and the 12 Great Feasts take precedence over the Sunday series.

One of many learning curves...
« Last Edit: February 08, 2021, 09:08:46 PM by J. Thomas Shelley »
Greek Orthodox-Ecumenical Patriarchate

Baptized, Confirmed, and Ordained United Methodist.
Served as a Lutheran Pastor October 31, 1989 - October 31, 2014.
Charter member of the first chapter of the Society of the Holy Trinity.

Chrismated Antiochian Orthodox, eve of Mary of Egypt Sunday, A.D. 2015

jebutler

  • ALPB Contribution Leader
  • *****
  • Posts: 1807
    • View Profile
Re: Definition of Occuli
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2021, 10:22:29 PM »
I kind of thought you'd say that Will. One of these years...

I have thought about going to the 1 year for a whole 3 year cycle. I'm sitting on a fence. And I don't think the congregation would care much either way.

Jeremy

I'm using the one year lectionary for three years (2020/21/22). Other than our elders (with whom I discussed the idea) I think only one person in the congregation who noticed is a retired pastor who told me he couldn't get away from the one year lectionary fast enough. I just said that I had never done it before; he said that he did it too many years.

It's OK, I guess. I miss spending a lot of a year focusing on one of the Gospels. And I still don't get the "gesima" Sundays or the rubrics for following them.

I know there are some real fans of the One Year Lectionary out there. It's OK, but I'm not really a die hard.
The truth we preach is not an abstract thing. The truth is a Person. The goodness we preach is not an ideal quality. The goodness is Someone who is good. The love we preach is God himself in Christ. --H. Grady Davis

peter_speckhard

  • ALPB Administrator
  • ALPB Contribution Leader
  • *****
  • Posts: 18098
    • View Profile
Re: Definition of Occuli
« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2021, 10:53:51 PM »
I use the three year and have most of my ministry. What I imagine is one of the benefits of the one year is that every service can have its own peculiar traditions. Even Advent is hard to do that with in the three year. Notice that the three year often repeats on certain days. I think familiarity via repetition is a positive. I know the three year brings in more Scripture, but I suspect for some people the appeal of it is that it waters down familiarity and repetition in favor of freshness and novelty. If that is the motivation, I think the move to the three year is a mistake.

J. Thomas Shelley

  • ALPB Contribution Leader
  • *****
  • Posts: 4062
    • View Profile
Re: Definition of Occuli
« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2021, 11:52:14 PM »
And I still don't get the "gesima" Sundays or the rubrics for following them.

The "Gesimas" are fairly easy to understand.

Quinquagesima is the 50th day before Easter.  In the three year lectionary it is titled Transfiguration
Sexagesima is not 60 days prior to Easter...only the 57th day, but "Sexa" follows Quinqua
Septuagesima is not 70 days prior to Easter...only the 64th day.

So....why do we need a seasonette† of preparation prior to a season of preparation?

I asked a similar question at first of Orthodoxy. 

Why do we need three Sundays of the Lenten Triodion before the Sunday of Forgiveness and the start of Great Lent?   Isn't this part of the Department of Redundancy Department?

But, after truly engaging into the rigors of Great Lent:   Fasting from all meat, all fish, all dairy and eggs, wine, and oil; Services of Great Compline every Monday evening, PreSanctified Divine Liturgy every Wednesday evening, and Salutations every Friday evening in addition to the normal Saturday evening Vespers I began to understand that this is a spiritual battleground--a contest that is not a sprint, but a marathon.

The pre-Lenten Sundays of Orthodoxy are the stretches and exercises of preparation for this marathon. 

The Sunday of the Pharisee and the Publican (this year, for us with Pascha on May 1, February 21) sets the tone with the reminder that our fasting and almsgiving might be as hollow and self-serving as the "prayer" the Pharisee offered to himself; unless we be filled with compunction and merely say "God, be merciful to me, a sinner".

The Sunday of the Prodigal (February 28, 2021) again raises the warning that we who have been faithfully serving our Father will have squandered our greatest inheritance if we cannot follow his example in embracing our once-lost-but-now returned brother.

The Sunday of the Last Judgment (March 7, 2021) again raises a warning:  That if we fail to serve the lost, the last, the least, and the lonely with purity of heart we will have failed the test of loving Christ through loving His people.

The themes of these Sundays are beautifully summarized in the Pentintential Troparia sung at the close of Psalm 51 after hearing the Sunday Orthros Gospel:

Quote

Eighth Tone

Glory to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit

Open to me the gates of repentance, O Giver of Life,
for early in the morning my spirit hastens to Your holy temple,
bringing the temple of my body all defiled.
But as one compassionate,
cleanse me, I pray,
by Your loving-kindness and mercy.

Both now and ever and unto ages of ages, Amen.

Guide me in the paths of salvation,O Theotokos,
for I have befouled my soul with shameful sins
and I heedlessly squandered all of my life's resources.
By your intercession deliver me from every uncleanness.

Sixth Tone

Verse: Have mercy on me, O God, according to Your great mercy; and according to the abundance of Your compassion, blot out my transgression.

When I ponder in my wretchedness on the many terrible things that I have done,
I tremble for that fearful day, the Day of Judgment.
But trusting in the mercy of Your compassion,
like David I cry to You,
"Have mercy on me, O God, according to Your great mercy."


Finally, then, on the 14th of March we are ready to embark on the marathon of Great Lent by literally embracing one another in the Vespers of Forgiveness.

Quote

We are entering the godly contest of the blameless Fast. 
Let us all diligently subdue the flesh through self control. 
Let us seek the Lord with prayers and tears, and completely deliberate every vice, and shout to Him, "We have sinned against You.
Save us, as you saved the Ninevites of old, O Christ our King. 
Grant us to share in your heavenly kingdom, O compassionate Lord. 

--Stichera from Forgiveness Vespers



†The seasonette has a proper name:  Shrovetide.  In modern calendar useage that name is sometimes applied to the three days from Quinquagesima/Transfiguration through Shrove Tuesday.

There is a parallel seasonette following Easter/Pascha:   The ten days beginning with the Feast of the Ascension through the Saturday before Pentecost are properly called Ascensiontide.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2021, 05:12:38 PM by J. Thomas Shelley »
Greek Orthodox-Ecumenical Patriarchate

Baptized, Confirmed, and Ordained United Methodist.
Served as a Lutheran Pastor October 31, 1989 - October 31, 2014.
Charter member of the first chapter of the Society of the Holy Trinity.

Chrismated Antiochian Orthodox, eve of Mary of Egypt Sunday, A.D. 2015

Weedon

  • Guest
Re: Definition of Occuli
« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2021, 03:34:12 PM »
Gesimatide makes NO sense...IF Lent is not a journey to Easter. But if it is a journey, a return to the Paschal life from which we constantly fall away, then it makes sense to do some preparation for the journey. Otherwise, you’d be off into Lent like Bilbo Baggins hurried out by Gandalf without his kerchief. So the three Sundays in the Western tradition prepare you for the journey to Paschal joy:

Grace - Septuagesima (the journey is not about YOUR hard work, but the generosity of the Master, who is good beyond any deserving)
Word - Sexagesima (the journey is accomplished via attention to the Word which has power to bring forth its fruits of faith and love)
Following - Quinquagesima or Estomihi (the journey is one of following Jesus where He leads us with our formerly blinded eyes now opened and joyously accompanying Him, as He accompanies us, “up” to Jerusalem: through death and all the little deaths to which Lent summons us, into everlasting life, but always a dying and rising WITH Him).

Jeremy_Loesch

  • ALPB Forum Member
  • **
  • Posts: 96
    • View Profile
Re: Definition of Occuli
« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2021, 08:32:11 PM »
I need to remember this, because....I am going to follow the Jim Butler plan and use the 1 Year for the next three years when Advent begins.

I had some unexpected free time this morning, so I called Jim on the phone and asked him how he did this. I think it will be received neutrally, as the people simply have the desire to have the Word preached to them.

It was a delight to talk to Jim and I think he was surprised.

Jeremy

Jeff-MN

  • ALPB Forum Regular
  • ***
  • Posts: 171
    • View Profile
Re: Definition of Occuli
« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2021, 08:43:53 PM »
The one thing about the one-year lectionary that is somewhat sad is the lack of the "Bread of Life" passages of John 6.

Weedon

  • Guest
Re: Definition of Occuli
« Reply #14 on: February 09, 2021, 08:47:04 PM »
I’ve changed two congregations and one International Center over to the one year and never had the least problem; you see, God’s people love God’s Word. They’re not overly concerned with how it is served up, but that it IS served up. But something will happen in those three years: the people will begin to remember and expect certain readings on certain days. In my dear friend Lee Maxwell’s parish, one lady exclaimed when she walked in and read the bulletin in August: “Oh, it’s O’er Jerusalem Thou Weepest Sunday! I love that day!!” (No we sadly no longer have that hymn in the hymnal). Since I believe that repetition is the mother of learning, I also think that basic biblical literacy tends to RISE when the same readings are screwed into the people’s hearts and minds each year; and the pastor learns what Loehe calls the secret of teaching - showing the doctrines of the Church from the texts that everyone knows. Everyone knows them because they hear them each year. I’ll be curious where you and Jim stand at the end of the three years in your opinions on the matter. (P.S. The intro to any of LSB lectionary volumes discusses the possibility that the future might require the catechetical strength of the repetition of the one year. There’s good stuff in there!).
« Last Edit: February 09, 2021, 08:53:05 PM by Weedon »