Author Topic: Valpo mascot task force  (Read 8987 times)

Augsburg Catholic

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Re: Valpo mascot task force
« Reply #120 on: February 14, 2021, 04:46:48 PM »
Lutheran identity was definitely much easier when church work programs were at the core and center of the school.

peter_speckhard

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Re: Valpo mascot task force
« Reply #121 on: February 14, 2021, 07:02:03 PM »
Lutheran identity was definitely much easier when church work programs were at the core and center of the school.
I think a big part of it is simply a critical mass of students who grew up Lutheran. The classes are great, but you can take classes online. A lot of college is the experience, which means the Lutheran identity won't be expressed doctrinally so much as culturally. I remember in our Christ College freshman production one line that got a big laugh was when the main character in the musical was too into himself at the office to take a call from his mother, so he told the receptionist to talk with her. The receptionist did one of the Bob Newhart, one side of the conversation shticks, that included, "No, I don't think he has found a good Missouri Synod girl," and then putting her hand over the phone and turning to the audience and saying, "what is a Missouri synod?"

The CC freshman class wasn't heavily LCMS, but everyone sensed that it served as a cultural focal point. My in-laws me at Valpo in the 60's. He was from New York, she was from Florida, but VU was a place where Lutherans met other other Lutherans. The problem with the drastic drifting apart of the Lutheran synods doctrinally, the worship wars, and the general decline of Christianity in the U.S. is that shared Lutheranism doesn't say as much as it used to. VU has had a greater percentage of Catholics than LCMS Lutherans for a long time, and from what I understand, greater attendance and participation at the St. Theresa Catholic student center/congregation than at the chapel. And the new president is Catholic. What keeps VU's Lutheran identity is inertia. My incoming freshman daughter might meet peterm's incoming freshman son; that kind of thing. (Sorry, my daughter already has a boyfriend). This is what I think VU is squandering.

At church this morning I heard from several people who were VU grads themselves (we have tons of them at St. Paul's) or whose kids had gone to Valpo. I got precisely zero positive feedback about the change. It ranged from bemused eye-rolling to anger, but nobody said, "Thank goodness we finally got rid of that Crusader mascot."

As I said upstream, my connection to Valpo runs deep. But it is also being totally taken for granted, which irks me to no end.   

Dave Benke

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Re: Valpo mascot task force
« Reply #122 on: February 14, 2021, 07:39:38 PM »
Lutheran identity was definitely much easier when church work programs were at the core and center of the school.

No doubt, at least in the Missouri Synod framework, and maybe (?don't know for sure) the WELS. 

First of all, though, the pool was so much deeper then, in terms of young people, family size, people connected for generations.  And even though they didn't pay that well, those positions - Lutheran teacher and Lutheran preacher - were respected and were paid at a level somewhat connected to the middle class, or at least the lower middle class.

How would/could you recruit girls and boys to a prep school for church work vocations today?  It would have to be a boarding school because you'd have to recruit well beyond one city or region.  The Concordia Prep schools were boarding schools, to large extent, but we had 100 boys (no girls so clergy only) in each prep school class.  At one of what was then 12 prep locations nationwide.  If all of us would have completed, we could have taken over the world.  Thankfully, I guess, the great weeding took place and about a quarter of us made it to the end. 

And now there are none. 

I don't know how the diocesan preparatory academies have gone in Roman Catholicism, but I think there are way fewer than there once were. 

I will say that Lutheran identity was pretty much coded into our being by the time we left Milwaukee after six years.  Although when we got there we were already well along the way.  Which is to go back to the main point.  Lutheranism was a substantial enterprise across the board 50 plus years ago.  That is no longer the case.

Dave Benke

peter_speckhard

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Re: Valpo mascot task force
« Reply #123 on: February 14, 2021, 08:07:17 PM »
Lutheran identity was definitely much easier when church work programs were at the core and center of the school.

No doubt, at least in the Missouri Synod framework, and maybe (?don't know for sure) the WELS. 

First of all, though, the pool was so much deeper then, in terms of young people, family size, people connected for generations.  And even though they didn't pay that well, those positions - Lutheran teacher and Lutheran preacher - were respected and were paid at a level somewhat connected to the middle class, or at least the lower middle class.

How would/could you recruit girls and boys to a prep school for church work vocations today?  It would have to be a boarding school because you'd have to recruit well beyond one city or region.  The Concordia Prep schools were boarding schools, to large extent, but we had 100 boys (no girls so clergy only) in each prep school class.  At one of what was then 12 prep locations nationwide.  If all of us would have completed, we could have taken over the world.  Thankfully, I guess, the great weeding took place and about a quarter of us made it to the end. 

And now there are none. 

I don't know how the diocesan preparatory academies have gone in Roman Catholicism, but I think there are way fewer than there once were. 

I will say that Lutheran identity was pretty much coded into our being by the time we left Milwaukee after six years.  Although when we got there we were already well along the way.  Which is to go back to the main point.  Lutheranism was a substantial enterprise across the board 50 plus years ago.  That is no longer the case.

Dave Benke
Both my parents went off to boarding school for 9th grade. My dad went for one year to Concordia-Milwaukee. Had the same dorm room that Walt Wangerin later had. But he hated it and was miserably homesick. My grandparents made him finish the year he'd started, but relented and let him come home for high school. My mom went from Canada to Seward, Nebraska for high school and college. She couldn't even always go home for breaks, and certainly couldn't afford a lot of long distance calls.

When I was in Green Bay the secretary asked about the differences between the WELS and LCMS. Her son wanted to go to the WELS boarding high school in Watertown, Wisconsin, but he'd have to become WELS to fit in. For whatever reason, he loved it there, and the family became WELS, which made sense since they had WELS roots and they lived much closer to a WELS congregation anyway. I think boarding high school cold be a great thing for a lot of people. But think of the costs. Just paying for regular Lutheran high school is way out of reach for a lot of people. Imagine adding room and board to that, and 24/7 supervision. I think that is an era that has come and gone for the most part. The WELS has a an admirable hard core dedication to keeping it alive. I wish them well, but I suspect they're behind the eight ball, too.

jebutler

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Re: Valpo mascot task force
« Reply #124 on: February 14, 2021, 08:19:00 PM »

And now there are none. 


Correction: and now there is one. My alma mater, St. Paul's Lutheran High School in Concordia, MO (known as St. Paul's College and College High when I was there).

I was there from my sophomore year of high school to my sophomore year of college (or as we put it, from Quinta to Prima). I loved it. Whenever I'm in the KC area, I always try to stop by Concordia, see my old home of Biltz dorm, have lunch at Topsy's Cafe, and ice cream at Cree Mee Freeze. I developed friends that I've known ever since. I'm amazed at what many of my fellow Saints of that era have done.

Having been one of the last of the system guys, I really got to understand how awful the walk out era was for the LCMS. Many of the guys who were in that battle had known each other since they were 14. They survived the hazing, adolescence, first dates, and a host of other things together. To be arguing and divided then had to be a hard and emotionally difficult thing for them.

 
These are things that we can discuss among learned and reasonable people, or even among ourselves. (Luther, SA III, paraphrased).

Dave Benke

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Re: Valpo mascot task force
« Reply #125 on: February 14, 2021, 09:21:12 PM »

And now there are none. 


Correction: and now there is one. My alma mater, St. Paul's Lutheran High School in Concordia, MO (known as St. Paul's College and College High when I was there).

I was there from my sophomore year of high school to my sophomore year of college (or as we put it, from Quinta to Prima). I loved it. Whenever I'm in the KC area, I always try to stop by Concordia, see my old home of Biltz dorm, have lunch at Topsy's Cafe, and ice cream at Cree Mee Freeze. I developed friends that I've known ever since. I'm amazed at what many of my fellow Saints of that era have done.

Having been one of the last of the system guys, I really got to understand how awful the walk out era was for the LCMS. Many of the guys who were in that battle had known each other since they were 14. They survived the hazing, adolescence, first dates, and a host of other things together. To be arguing and divided then had to be a hard and emotionally difficult thing for them.

Them = us = me.  Dave Likeness and I were at what I think was the zenith of the system in terms of its post-WWII output.   I was at St. Louis in the summer of '73 on my way out to NYC.  As it happened.  Boom. 

St. Paul Concordia, dude.  Those dudes were batpoop crazy.  Like us.  We hung out a lot.  One was the best man at my wedding.  But they were nuts.  When we all met up at Ft. Wayne it was amazing how different and yet how similar we were.  A guy like you who was not A Six Year Man, which was the definition of a Human Being, had a chance to become a Human Being, but had to kind of figure it out.  Same with those who came for Junior College.  Because by then we already had our various rat packs. 

Nobody much tells the stories of the prep system, the old junior college system.  Thinking back, as Peter's dad found out, the first months there were really hard on us 14 year olds.  The rule was zero trips home and zero trips from home to you for the first six weeks.  Maybe through October.  Cold turkey.  Lots of late night sniffling.  And then of course the hazing and the rituals of adolescence, the Animal Farm of it all.  In that sense it was great in its way - unique. 

At some point the prep hoops team (Milwaukee was all about varsity hoops and varsity swimming - Ackmann's pool, and in its way was a jockocracy) played St. John's Military Academy in Delavan.  We beat 'em, of course, but spent time in their rooms.  It was dead-on absolutely the same system with uniforms and military nomenclature.  Plus we got the catechism and all those languages.  But same lifestyle. 

The thing I will say is that there was an understanding that we were adolescent males, would act out and sow some wild oats, and within pretty well-known boundaries, that was OK.  The school was in that era 'in loco parentis.'  And the unspoken agreement was that if the school didn't tell the parents all the stuff we did, we wouldn't tell the parents all the stuff the school did.  And we did have, in abundance, the Lutheran culture. 

Dave Benke

peter_speckhard

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Re: Valpo mascot task force
« Reply #126 on: February 14, 2021, 10:23:19 PM »

And now there are none. 


Correction: and now there is one. My alma mater, St. Paul's Lutheran High School in Concordia, MO (known as St. Paul's College and College High when I was there).

I was there from my sophomore year of high school to my sophomore year of college (or as we put it, from Quinta to Prima). I loved it. Whenever I'm in the KC area, I always try to stop by Concordia, see my old home of Biltz dorm, have lunch at Topsy's Cafe, and ice cream at Cree Mee Freeze. I developed friends that I've known ever since. I'm amazed at what many of my fellow Saints of that era have done.

Having been one of the last of the system guys, I really got to understand how awful the walk out era was for the LCMS. Many of the guys who were in that battle had known each other since they were 14. They survived the hazing, adolescence, first dates, and a host of other things together. To be arguing and divided then had to be a hard and emotionally difficult thing for them.

Them = us = me.  Dave Likeness and I were at what I think was the zenith of the system in terms of its post-WWII output.   I was at St. Louis in the summer of '73 on my way out to NYC.  As it happened.  Boom. 

St. Paul Concordia, dude.  Those dudes were batpoop crazy.  Like us.  We hung out a lot.  One was the best man at my wedding.  But they were nuts.  When we all met up at Ft. Wayne it was amazing how different and yet how similar we were.  A guy like you who was not A Six Year Man, which was the definition of a Human Being, had a chance to become a Human Being, but had to kind of figure it out.  Same with those who came for Junior College.  Because by then we already had our various rat packs. 

Nobody much tells the stories of the prep system, the old junior college system.  Thinking back, as Peter's dad found out, the first months there were really hard on us 14 year olds.  The rule was zero trips home and zero trips from home to you for the first six weeks.  Maybe through October.  Cold turkey.  Lots of late night sniffling.  And then of course the hazing and the rituals of adolescence, the Animal Farm of it all.  In that sense it was great in its way - unique. 

At some point the prep hoops team (Milwaukee was all about varsity hoops and varsity swimming - Ackmann's pool, and in its way was a jockocracy) played St. John's Military Academy in Delavan.  We beat 'em, of course, but spent time in their rooms.  It was dead-on absolutely the same system with uniforms and military nomenclature.  Plus we got the catechism and all those languages.  But same lifestyle. 

The thing I will say is that there was an understanding that we were adolescent males, would act out and sow some wild oats, and within pretty well-known boundaries, that was OK.  The school was in that era 'in loco parentis.'  And the unspoken agreement was that if the school didn't tell the parents all the stuff we did, we wouldn't tell the parents all the stuff the school did.  And we did have, in abundance, the Lutheran culture. 

Dave Benke
Well stated. The past has glories all its own. Every funeral is the burial of an era. There are time I wish I were fifteen years older, and times I wish I were fifteen years younger. Or thirty years either way. But as Gandalf would say, that is not for us to choose. The only thing we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us. For a pastor and family man, to be 51 in 2021 is something of a wild ride.

Dave Likeness

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Re: Valpo mascot task force
« Reply #127 on: February 14, 2021, 10:56:20 PM »
Bishop Benke is correct.  The old LCMS System of 12 years for pre-ministerial students
was built on Lutheran culture.   The fact is that many of my classmates and I at Concordia
High School, Milwaukee had graduated from 8 years of a Lutheran Elementary School.
This adds up for me sitting in LCMS classrooms for 19 years plus 1 year of vicarage.

My only co-education took place in grade school and after that it was all male classrooms
with all male professors.  The good news is that we received a top-notch classic education.
In Milwaukee, my Christian Doctrine class as a freshman in college was taught by Prof. Ewald
Plass, a Luther scholar.  It was really an in depth look at Lutheran doctrine that made a lasting
impression on me.  He also held up the pastoral ministry as a calling that God would bless.

Brian Stoffregen

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Re: Valpo mascot task force
« Reply #128 on: February 15, 2021, 01:24:26 AM »
"The Lutheran identity."  It was mentioned with the definite article, which indicates a singular, more definitive identity under the banner of Lutheran.  Recently CTS-FW sent out its Concordia Theological Quarterly for January of 2021, and the last article in the journal is one written by Dr. Peter Scaer entitled: "At Home in the Body: Lutheran Identity."  But I suspect the "Lutheran identity" he describes will not be agreed to by all here. In fact, I know it won't.  Although we like to describe an institution of higher learning as having "the Lutheran identity," I think we all would admit that as we have discovered here, it is more like "a Lutheran identity." The indefinite article best describes the myriad of things we think define the Lutheranism of a school, but in no way create a unified picture, and sometimes describe clearly conflicting images under the Reformer's name.  Can we even give a good definition of what constitutes Lutheran identity to which most Lutherans might subscribe? I have my doubts.


Lutheran Identity as well as Christian Identity might be pictured as a series of circles, like a target (see attachment). The essential core beliefs are in the center then increasingly less important ones moving towards the outer circles. I believe that the ELCA's Confessions of Faith does that.


In the core circle are:
     Confessing the Trinity: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
     Confessing Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord.
     Confessing the Gospel as the power of God for salvation for all who believe.
In the next circle is the acceptance of Scriptures as the inspired Word of God.
Next is the acceptance of the three ecumenical creeds: Apostles', Nicene, & Athanasian.
Next is the acceptance of the Augsburg Confession as a true witness to the Gospel.
Next is the acceptance of the other confessional writings in the Book of Concord.


Other may put these in a slightly different hierarchy or subtract or add things to them.


How far out from the core does one have to go to maintain a "Christian Identity." I do not consider Mormons or Jehovah Witnesses to be Christians because they do not confess the orthodox doctrine of the Trinity.


Yet, I can consider those earliest believers to be Christians even though they did not have the New Testament as the inspired word of God; and almost no one had copies of the Old Testament (and few would have been able to read it). They did have their confession about the Trinity, e.g., baptism in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit in Matthew and in the Didache, Jesus as Savior and Lord, and knew the power of the Gospel for salvation.


There are denominations today who do not confess the ecumenical creeds; others who include them with some other credal statements they use. I don't consider them outside of the Christian identity.


Does one have to go to the outer circle, all the documents in the Book of Concord for a Lutheran Identity? Not all of them are accepted by all Lutheran denominations around the world.


Who establishes the identity? Zion Lutheran Church in Worland, WY had been E&R which merged into the UCC. That's what they were when a friend served the ELCA congregation in town. Since then they've become independent, but self-identify as "Lutheran." From what I know, that means they used Luther's Small Catechism in confirmation classes. My friend said that it was hard to convince new-comers to town that Zion was not a Lutheran Church, when the big letters on the sign in the front of the building says, "Lutheran."


The folks at Valpo (as well as all the other Lutheran universities) identify themselves as "Lutheran." I would think that those who question that would have to show where they fail to be Lutheran. That is, what are they doing that would disqualify them from calling themselves Lutheran?
"The church had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

Brian Stoffregen

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Re: Valpo mascot task force
« Reply #129 on: February 15, 2021, 01:41:49 AM »
Bishop Benke is correct.  The old LCMS System of 12 years for pre-ministerial students
was built on Lutheran culture.   The fact is that many of my classmates and I at Concordia
High School, Milwaukee had graduated from 8 years of a Lutheran Elementary School.
This adds up for me sitting in LCMS classrooms for 19 years plus 1 year of vicarage.

My only co-education took place in grade school and after that it was all male classrooms
with all male professors.  The good news is that we received a top-notch classic education.
In Milwaukee, my Christian Doctrine class as a freshman in college was taught by Prof. Ewald
Plass, a Luther scholar.  It was really an in depth look at Lutheran doctrine that made a lasting
impression on me.  He also held up the pastoral ministry as a calling that God would bless.


When I went to Concordia-Portland back in '69-'71, I believe all 180 students were members of Lutheran Congregations. They only offered two tracks: education (with students usually transferring to Seward,) and pre-seminary (with students transferring to the Sr. College at Ft. Wayne). (I got married and transferred to a State school in Washington and got my BA in one year.) There was also a high school on campus. Some of the students had never attended a non-LCMS school.

A relative, a few years ago, went to Concordia U in Portland to get her Masters in Education. I believe that they had around 6000 students when she went. She had never belonged to a Lutheran Congregation (or even a mainline congregation). She had no plans of teaching in a Lutheran school. It was an easy way to get the advanced degree in her hometown. The school's identity had changed.

Another school I attended went through an identity change, too; and it no longer exists. The Lutheran Bible Institute in Seattle was a non-credited two-year Bible school. (I only went one year.) In the mid 70s they expanded and working with a college in Seattle, offered a credited Bachelor's Degree. They'd become a four-year school. They moved to a larger campus in Issaquah, WA, changed their name to Trinity Lutheran College. They ended up selling that campus, moved to an office building in Everett, WA. They closed up shop in 2016.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trinity_Lutheran_College_(Washington)
« Last Edit: February 15, 2021, 01:43:32 AM by Brian Stoffregen »
"The church had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

Jeremy_Loesch

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Re: Valpo mascot task force
« Reply #130 on: February 15, 2021, 06:32:44 AM »

And now there are none. 


Correction: and now there is one. My alma mater, St. Paul's Lutheran High School in Concordia, MO (known as St. Paul's College and College High when I was there).

I was there from my sophomore year of high school to my sophomore year of college (or as we put it, from Quinta to Prima). I loved it. Whenever I'm in the KC area, I always try to stop by Concordia, see my old home of Biltz dorm, have lunch at Topsy's Cafe, and ice cream at Cree Mee Freeze. I developed friends that I've known ever since. I'm amazed at what many of my fellow Saints of that era have done.

Having been one of the last of the system guys, I really got to understand how awful the walk out era was for the LCMS. Many of the guys who were in that battle had known each other since they were 14. They survived the hazing, adolescence, first dates, and a host of other things together. To be arguing and divided then had to be a hard and emotionally difficult thing for them.

Cree Mee Freeze. Their kid cones are huge! My littlest ones think they are big kids because of the size.

I do a committal service out at St. Paul's cemetery every so often and if it's summertime, that is where I get my daily bread. And since my parents relocated to KC, we have about ten St. Paul's students or Concordia residents in our congregation.

Jeremy

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Re: Valpo mascot task force
« Reply #131 on: February 15, 2021, 09:25:43 AM »
"The Lutheran identity."  It was mentioned with the definite article, which indicates a singular, more definitive identity under the banner of Lutheran.  Recently CTS-FW sent out its Concordia Theological Quarterly for January of 2021, and the last article in the journal is one written by Dr. Peter Scaer entitled: "At Home in the Body: Lutheran Identity."  But I suspect the "Lutheran identity" he describes will not be agreed to by all here. In fact, I know it won't.  Although we like to describe an institution of higher learning as having "the Lutheran identity," I think we all would admit that as we have discovered here, it is more like "a Lutheran identity." The indefinite article best describes the myriad of things we think define the Lutheranism of a school, but in no way create a unified picture, and sometimes describe clearly conflicting images under the Reformer's name.  Can we even give a good definition of what constitutes Lutheran identity to which most Lutherans might subscribe? I have my doubts.

Thanks for the reference, Don, and the thoughts on the difficulty of finding a "definite" article for Lutheran Identity.

A starting point for Lutheran identity might be Evangelical Catholicism and what that means and entails.  The last issue of Lutheran Forum gives good witness, with a half dozen articles on the topic.   Scaer's article, it should be noted, doesn't deal with the Gospel at all, nor forgiveness, nor the Sacraments, but is an extended catalog of cultural identity sins. 

Several years ago now the CUS system had each Concordia come up with its concept of Lutheran identity in its offerings and mission.  I had a copy of the Lutheran Identity outline that Paul Sauer and colleagues drew up for the almost-late-much-lamented Concordia Bronxville.  That then was put in context of the overarching Lutheran Identity effort by CUS itself, and will, I think, form the basis for the new arrangement to be coming out of LCMS Inc. at some time in the relatively near future.  That's my recollection.

I will say that if and as Lutheran Identity discussion strays in any significant way from the local assembly of believers gathered around the Gospel and the Sacraments it's going to lose its way quickly.

Dave Benke

I will say that if and as Lutheran Identity discussion strays in any significant way from the local assembly of believers gathered around the Gospel and the Sacraments it's going to lose its way quickly.

AMEN to that!

The last issue of Lutheran Forum gives good witness, with a half dozen articles on the topic.

Right! I got mine only yesterday (thanks for nothing, USPS) but a quick review suggests it will be rich in resources for understanding Lutheran identity.

Peace, JOHN
Pr. JOHN HANNAH, STS

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Re: Valpo mascot task force
« Reply #132 on: February 16, 2021, 08:49:31 AM »
Yesterday, the Chicago Sun-Times newspaper had an article on its sports pages about
the demise of the Valpo mascot.  Part of the headline read "The Power of Words".
The article stated that for the past 79 years Crusaders has been part of the Valpo sports
scene.  Adam Amin was interviewed for the article.  He is the Chicago Bulls play by play
announcer.  Adam is also a Valpo grad and a Muslim. When asked about the name change
he stated: "It all depends on how important symbolism is to you"

This sports page article mentioned that Crusaders were Christian Warriors in the Middle
Ages who killed Jews, Muslims, and non-Christians.  Valpo is only 55 miles east of Chicago.
It seemed strange to see this article in the sports section of a major newspaper.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2021, 09:06:19 AM by Dave Likeness »

peter_speckhard

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Re: Valpo mascot task force
« Reply #133 on: February 16, 2021, 09:20:06 AM »
Yesterday, the Chicago Sun-Times newspaper had an article on its sports pages about
the demise of the Valpo mascot.  Part of the headline read "The Power of Words".
The article stated that for the past 79 years Crusaders has been part of the Valpo sports
scene.  Adam Amin was interviewed for the article.  He is the Chicago Bulls play by play
announcer.  Adam is also a Valpo grad and a Muslim. When asked about the name change
he stated: "It all depends on how important symbolism is to you"

This sports page article mentioned that Crusaders were Christian Warriors in the Middle
Ages who killed Jews, Muslims, and non-Christians.  Valpo is only 55 miles east of Chicago.
It seemed strange to see this article in the sports section of a major newspaper.
Amin also said (in another paper several days ago, not the Sun-Times, but either the Tribune or the NWI Times) that he knew all about the history of the crusades before he went to Valpo, and spent his academic career in sports broadcasting working closely with the Crusader teams and the nickname and mascot never bothered him in the slightest.

The key whether people come to a place willing to adjust themselves and become a part of the pre-existing identity of the place. Amin obviously was able to do that. Too many people today are on a campaign to reform a place before they've been formed by it. If I went to a Muslim school and they were the Saracens or some such (as believe some teams are named), I would never ask that they change it for my sake.

peter_speckhard

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Re: Valpo mascot task force
« Reply #134 on: February 16, 2021, 03:46:18 PM »
https://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/suicide-of-the-humanities-dan-el-padilla-peralta-classics/

While this article deals specifically with Classics, I think the crusaders brouhaha fits into the framework of the same discussion.