Author Topic: Thanksgiving 2020 Now Thank We All Our God  (Read 888 times)

Julio

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Thanksgiving 2020 Now Thank We All Our God
« on: November 19, 2020, 01:26:02 AM »
Thanksgiving 2020 is soon upon us ... and tragically it seems that there are far too many posts of thanklessness.

For many, Now Than We All our God will be part of thankfulness to our Good and Gracious Triune God on Thanksgiving Eve or Day.

Evangelical Lutheran Hymn-Book (CPH 1912) Hymn   64 (Apparently 1912 though the house copy clearly states ‘Edition of 1924’)
The Lutheran Hymnal                  (CPH 1941) Hymn   36
Lutheran Worship                        (CPH 1982) Hymn 443
Lutheran Service Book                 (CPH 2006) Hymn 895

Quote from: Now Thank We All Our God
1. Now thank we all our God.                     
With heart and hands and voices,
Who wondrous things hath done,
In whom His world rejoices;
Who from our mother's arms
Hath blessed us on our way
With countless gifts of love,
And still is ours today.

2. Oh, may this bounteous God
Through all our life be near us,
With ever joyful hearts
And blessed peace to cheer us;
And keep us in His grace
And guide us when perplexed
And free us from all ills
In this world and the next.

3. All praise and thanks to God
The Father now be given,
The Son, and Him who reigns
With them in highest heaven:
The one eternal God,
Whom earth and heaven adore!
For thus it was, is now,
And shall be evermore.

Organ Accompaniment

Many already know the story of Now Thank We All Our God, Lutheran Pastor Martin Rinkart was living in conditions far more dreadful than anything any of us are experiencing today ...

Quote from: STORY BEHIND THE SONG: Pastor gives praise, thanks during darkest of times
From 1618 to 1648, Europe, and especially Germany, was devastated by famine, disease and destruction during the Thirty Years’ War. In 1636 Martin Rinkart, a Lutheran pastor in Eilenburg, Germany, wrote the hymn “Now Thank We All Our God” (Nun danket alle Gott), a hymn of thanksgiving still sung today. <snip>

Now he had to do the work of three men, and buried 40 to 50 people a day — a total of 4,480 — but through it all he remained well. Finally, it became necessary to bury the refugees in trenches without service.

Through grief, and loss, suffering and death, Rinkart always looked to his Savior, and could thank God for the blessings he still had. “Now Thank We All Our God” began as a family prayer before meals, and later was sung as a national thanksgiving at a celebration service when the Thirty Years’ War ended. With the exception of “A Mighty Fortress is Our God,” it is the most widely sung hymn in Germany, sung on numerous occasions of national rejoicing.

Read the entire account  here.

Don’t each and every one of us really have much more to be thankful for TODAY and this YEAR than Pastor Rinkart when he penned these marvelous words of faith?

Julio

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Re: Thanksgiving 2020 Now Thank We All Our God
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2020, 01:29:37 AM »
Now Thank We All Our God ... auf Deutsch

Quote from:  Nun darker alle Gott
Nun danket alle Gott
mit Herzen, Mund und Händen,
der große Dinge tut
an uns und allen Enden,
der uns von Mutterleib
und Kindesbeinen an
unzählig viel zu gut
bis hierher hat getan.
 
Der ewig reiche Gott
woll uns in unserm Leben
ein immer fröhlich Herz
und edlen Frieden geben,
und uns in seiner Gnad
erhalten fort und fort,
und uns aus aller Not
erlösen hier und dort.
 
Lob, Ehr und Preis sei Gott,
dem Vater und dem Sohne,
und Gott, dem Heilgen Geist
im höchsten Himmelsthrone,
ihm, dem dreieinen Gott,
wie es im Anfang war
und ist und bleiben wird
so jetzt und immerdar.

With great thanks to those not language challenged as I.

IF anyone has a copy of the CPH German predecessor Kirchengesangbuch and the German lyrics differ, please provide them along with the hymn number reference as well.

Pr. Terry Culler

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Re: Thanksgiving 2020 Now Thank We All Our God
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2020, 08:44:40 AM »
This has always been one of my favorite hymns and I'm looking forward tannging it Sunday Morning along with along with Come Ye Thankful People, Come and Now Thank We All Our God.  I love Thanksgiving because the pagans can't steal it from us--if you give Thanks you must be thanking some One.
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J. Thomas Shelley

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Re: Thanksgiving 2020 Now Thank We All Our God
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2020, 09:09:44 AM »
From last year's November Ladder, newsletter of the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church of York, PA"

Quote
Giving Thanks for all things

It is good to give praise to the Lord and to chant Your name O Exulted One. To proclaim Your mercy in the morning and Your truth in the night!
--Psalm 91:1-2 [Orthros Prayer]

The month of November brings American Thanksgiving Day.   As Orthodox Christians, we know that giving thanks is not to be limited to one single day of feasting, but, as the Psalm verse from the Orthros prayers declares, it should be part of each and every day.

There are days...sometimes stretching into months...when giving thanks requires considerable effort.   The cares and burdens of life weight us down, the raw wounds of fresh loses and bereavements diminish the joy and celebration of holidays.   For far too many of the families of our community there will be a newly vacated empty place at this year’s Thanksgiving Day table.

Even with the passing of years our holiday memories may be bittersweet.  It is nearly twenty years since my mother’s repose, yet each November I still remember the lavish feast that she would prepare during my childhood.

Mom wanted to make sure that each and every family member and each and every guest would have their favorite dessert.   She would begin baking on Monday: a mince pie, a raisin pie, two pumpkin pies, a maraschino cherry cake, a walnut cake, and sometimes a pineapple-upsidedown cake as well as raisin nut bread, lemon bread, and pumpkin bread. Those years are gone forever:  gone too are the more recent years when her feast was less lavish.

Bittersweetness is part and parcel of American Thanksgiving Day.   The fabled feast after a great harvest in the Massachuesetts Bay Colony was accompanied by the recent memory of the winter of starvation which had preceded it.  President Abraham Lincoln’s Thanksgiving Proclamation of 1863 was issued while wounded soldiers from the horrific battle of Gettysburg where still being treated in a tent hospital in York’s Penn Common.

Such intersections of poverty and plenty are reflected in the words of the Orthros prayer of the Hours:

In the morning are we filled with Your mercy, O Lord, and we rejoice and delight in all of our days. Let us delight therefore even in the days that you make us lowly and for the years that we have seen evils. And look upon Your servants and upon Your works and lead their sons aright. And let the light of the Lord our God be upon us, and the works of our hands may You guide aright. Yea, the works of our hands may You guide aright.  [Orthros Prayer]

May we be able to give thanks to God in all times and places, and to say with our father among the saints John Chrysostom (whose feast we keep this month)

“Glory to God for all things!”
« Last Edit: November 19, 2020, 09:14:00 AM by J. Thomas Shelley »
Greek Orthodox-Ecumenical Patriarchate

Baptized, Confirmed, and Ordained United Methodist.
Served as a Lutheran Pastor October 31, 1989 - October 31, 2014.
Charter member of the first chapter of the Society of the Holy Trinity.

Chrismated Antiochian Orthodox, eve of Mary of Egypt Sunday, A.D. 2015

J. Thomas Shelley

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Re: Thanksgiving 2020 Now Thank We All Our God
« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2020, 10:27:16 AM »
A two minute video on gratitute from a Greek Orthodox Priest, recommended by Archbishop Elpidophoros:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zl48tgT4TT4&feature=youtu.be
Greek Orthodox-Ecumenical Patriarchate

Baptized, Confirmed, and Ordained United Methodist.
Served as a Lutheran Pastor October 31, 1989 - October 31, 2014.
Charter member of the first chapter of the Society of the Holy Trinity.

Chrismated Antiochian Orthodox, eve of Mary of Egypt Sunday, A.D. 2015

Mark Joel

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Re: Thanksgiving 2020 Now Thank We All Our God
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2020, 12:12:55 PM »
ELW #840.

This wonderful hymn was also a staple of the Moravian brass players in the 18th century new world settlements. It is quite thrilling to hear (or play) the version for baroque trumpets or natural horns available in The Moravian Brass Duet Book, Volume I.

Of course, maybe it's only possible for ELCA brass players since we have resolved our difficulties with the Zinzendorfers.  ;)

For more brass on this, go here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3KunbU5nwQ

jebutler

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Re: Thanksgiving 2020 Now Thank We All Our God
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2020, 12:31:24 PM »
ELW #840.

This wonderful hymn was also a staple of the Moravian brass players in the 18th century new world settlements. It is quite thrilling to hear (or play) the version for baroque trumpets or natural horns available in The Moravian Brass Duet Book, Volume I.

Of course, maybe it's only possible for ELCA brass players since we have resolved our difficulties with the Zinzendorfers.  ;)

For more brass on this, go here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3KunbU5nwQ

LBW 533, 534

CW (WELS) 610
These are things that we can discuss among learned and reasonable people, or even among ourselves. (Luther, SA III, paraphrased).

Julio

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Re: Thanksgiving 2020 Now Thank We All Our God
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2020, 12:13:20 AM »
CW (WELS) 610

Thank you for the CW reference ... the Christian Worship reference was intended .. but was distracted when retrieving the Evangelical Lutheran Hymn-Book from another bookshelf.

Kings College, Cambridge provides an across the pond rendition of Now Thank We All Our God

For an Organ only (captioned lyrics provided) Now Thank We All Our God - J. S. Bach (arr. Virgil Fox)

Julio

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Re: Thanksgiving 2020 Now Thank We All Our God
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2020, 12:31:05 AM »
A Pastor’s Message from a November Congregation Newsletter recently received electronically ..

Quote from:  Deuteronomy 16
13 “You shall keep the Feast of Booths seven days, when you have gathered in the produce from your threshing floor and your winepress. 14 You shall rejoice in your feast, you and your son and your daughter, your male servant and your female servant, the Levite, the sojourner, the fatherless, and the widow who are within your towns. 15 For seven days you shall keep the feast to the Lord your God at the place that the Lord will choose, because the Lord your God will bless you in all your produce and in all the work of your hands, so that you will be altogether joyful.
Quote from: Times of Thanksgiving
It seems natural for people everywhere to acknowledge their blessings with a special time of thanks-giving. It’s important to look back and count our blessings, even through (especially through!) the hardships we’ve endured. It may seem natural, but it is also The Old Testament people of God observed 3 great feasts, according to the instructions of Deuteronomy. The third of these was a harvest feast: the Feast of Booths (or Tabernacles). The Hebrew name of the festival, “Sukkot”, refers to the booths or tents that were set up in the fields for the farmers, temporary dwellings for them while they brought in the harvest. These tents were also meant to remind the people of their 40 years of wilderness sojourn, when they (and the Ark of the Covenant) also resided in tents. Those 40 years, I’m sure, were no picnic for the Israelites. But perhaps they made it all the sweeter when they finally could settle in their permanent home – the Promised Land.

We don’t celebrate the Old Covenant and its feasts anymore since their fulfillment in Christ. But we are still thankful, and take time to do so formally. As Christians, our whole lives are lived in thanksgiving to God. Thanksgiving is part of every Christian gathering. Christ’s redemption, Luther teaches us, is the cause for us to “thank and praise, serve and obey him”. But then there’s this thing that happens in November every year...

Thanksgiving as a national holiday can be traced back to 1864 and the declaration of Abraham Lincoln for a national day of thanksgiving. This day was declared during great hardship – in the midst of the Civil War! You should read his declaration. It’s full of humble reverence before God and recognizes him and his blessings.

Then of course there’s the “First Thanksgiving” feast in which the pilgrims shared a meal with the Native Americans. They, too had faced challenges of a hardscrabble life and rejoiced to survive the winter. One article describes it this way: Just over 50 colonists are believed to have attended, including 22 men, four married women... and more than 25 children and teenagers. These were the lucky ones who had made it through a rough entry into the New World, including a harsh winter during which an epidemic of disease swept through the colony, felling nearly half the original group. Some 78 percent of the women who had arrived on the Mayflower had died during the first winter, a far higher percentage than for men or children. “For the English, [the first Thanksgiving] was also celebrating the fact that they had survived their first year here in New England,” (Sarah Pruitt from History.com)

Somehow I suspect Thanksgiving 2020 will be a special one for many people. We have much for which to be thankful. Even under all the chaos of the pandemic – we have food and clothing, food and drink, house and home... and abundant physical blessings. Most of us have been spared the illness, and those of us that have gotten it have almost all recovered. We have excellent medical care to aid in that, and improvements have been made even from the early days of COVID. The millions of deaths that were first predicted seem to be off the table. Thanks be to God.

But perhaps most of all, the pandemic has not separated us from the Word of God. We still have many opportunities to hear and receive – both in person and via technology, the gifts of God. Our church has faced its challenges, just as each of us has in many ways – work, family, friends. But God has blessed us richly. Perhaps he has even used these difficult circumstances to increase in us an appreciation of that which is most important. I know it has been that way for me.

As Christians we have a far deeper understanding of “thanks-giving” than anyone. For starters, we know the Giver of all good things: the Triune God, who bestows blessings of creation, redemption and sanctification. We give him thanks for our very existence – in him we live and breathe and have our being. But even more. We give him thanks for the redemption he has provided us in his Son Jesus Christ our Lord. A spotless sacrifice for sin, whose blood purifies us all. A perfect substitute who takes our place both in the punishment we deserve, but also in accomplishing the righteousness we cannot. At the top of any lists of counted blessings, for us Christians, is Jesus Christ our blessed Savior.

We will offer a service of Evening Prayer on Thanksgiving Eve - Wednesday November 25th, 7pm. Please join us (if your level of precaution allows) for a time of reflection on God’s word and consideration of his gifts to us, for which we give him our heartfelt thanks.

Julio

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Thanksgiving Proclamation of 1789
« Reply #9 on: November 25, 2020, 12:54:28 AM »
Thanksgiving Proclamation of 1789

Quote
Washington issued a proclamation on October 3, 1789, designating Thursday, November 26 as a national day of thanks. In his proclamation, Washington declared that the necessity for such a day sprung from the Almighty’s care of Americans prior to the Revolution, assistance to them in achieving independence, and help in establishing the constitutional government.

Quote from: President George Washington
By the President of the United States of America, a Proclamation.

Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor-- and whereas both Houses of Congress have by their joint Committee requested me to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness.

Now therefore I do recommend and assign Thursday the 26th day of November next to be devoted by the People of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being, who is the beneficent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be-- That we may then all unite in rendering unto him our sincere and humble thanks--for his kind care and protection of the People of this Country previous to their becoming a Nation--for the signal and manifold mercies, and the favorable interpositions of his Providence which we experienced in the course and conclusion of the late war--for the great degree of tranquility, union, and plenty, which we have since enjoyed--for the peaceable and rational manner, in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national One now lately instituted--for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed; and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge; and in general for all the great and various favors which he hath been pleased to confer upon us.

and also that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech him to pardon our national and other transgressions-- to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually--to render our national government a blessing to all the people, by constantly being a Government of wise, just, and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed--to protect and guide all Sovereigns and Nations (especially such as have shewn kindness unto us) and to bless them with good government, peace, and concord--To promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the encrease of science among them and us--and generally to grant unto all Mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best.

Given under my hand at the City of New York the third day of October in the year of our Lord 1789.

Go: Washington
https://www.mountvernon.org/education/primary-sources-2/article/thanksgiving-proclamation-of-1789/
« Last Edit: November 25, 2020, 12:56:35 AM by Julio »