Author Topic: Halloween, All Saints, All Souls  (Read 1041 times)

D. Engebretson

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Re: Halloween, All Saints, All Souls
« Reply #15 on: October 29, 2020, 02:03:14 PM »
Another interesting detail of All Saints:
From the first Book of Common Prayer in the reign of Edward VI (1549), the first reading appointed for Matins on that day is the Apocrypha book of the Wisdom of Solomon (listed by its Latin name, "Sapi" for "Sapientia"), chapter 3, "unto 'Blessed is rather the baren'" (13a).  I would assume this to be an old reading predating the English Reformation.
But the souls of the righteous are in the hand of God,
and no torment will ever touch them.
In the eyes of the foolish they seemed to have died,
and their departure was thought to be an evil thing,
and their going from us to be their destruction;
but they are at peace.
For though in the sight of men they were punished,
their hope is full of immortality.
Having been disciplined a little, they will receive great good,
because God tested them and found them worthy of himself;
like gold in the furnace he tried them,
and like a sacrificial whole burnt offering he accepted them.
In the time of his visitation they will shine forth and will run like
     sparks through the stubble.
They will govern nations and rule over peoples,
and the Lord will reign over them forever.
Those who trust in him will understand truth,
and the faithful will abide with him in love,
because grace and mercy are upon his holy ones,
and he watches over his chosen.
but the ungodly will be punished as their reasoning deserves,
who disregarded the righteous man and rebelled against the Lord;
for whoever despises wisdom and instruction is miserable.
Their hope is in vain, their labors are unprofitable, and their works are useless.
Their wives are foolish, and their children evil;
their offspring are accursed.


Taken from The Apocrypha - The Lutheran Edition with Notes (CPH, 2012)
« Last Edit: October 29, 2020, 02:07:38 PM by D. Engebretson »
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J. Thomas Shelley

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Re: Halloween, All Saints, All Souls
« Reply #16 on: October 29, 2020, 02:06:21 PM »
Remember, this is the Sunday when Daylight Savings Time has ended. 
Turn back your clocks an hour or you will miss church on Sunday - except in Arizona and a few other sensible places that have been blessedly exempted from the curse of time change.!

Actually you will be an hour early.

It is at "Spring forward" that one would be late...or on "Mediterranean (Greek, Syrian, Egyptian, etc) time".

Thanks for the correction!  Haven't lived under "Daylight Savings Time for 9 years, forgot the Spring Forward, Fall Back dictum!
We remind our community to "fall back" but secretly hope that they won't so that they actually show up on time...rather than on "Greek time"
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Weedon

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Re: Halloween, All Saints, All Souls
« Reply #17 on: October 29, 2020, 02:08:27 PM »
Don, remember that the KJV had and prescribed the Apocrypha for reading in Church as well. I’m currently using its reading schedule for Matins and Vespers. This morning’s reading was Sirach 8 and Luke 15. A few weeks ago, we read through all the book of Wisdom, including that lovely passage. Just like Lutherans kept reading (also in the services) the Apocrypha, so did the Anglicans. CPH even published Bibles into the 20th century that prescribed an “epistle” from Sirach for the Festival of the Nativity of Mary!
« Last Edit: October 29, 2020, 02:10:25 PM by Weedon »
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Dan Fienen

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Re: Halloween, All Saints, All Souls
« Reply #18 on: October 29, 2020, 02:10:29 PM »
The best explanation that I have heard for Daylight Saving Time is that it was invented by a wise old Hittite who cut his blanket off on one end and sewed it onto the other to make it longer.
Pr. Daniel Fienen
LCMS

D. Engebretson

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Re: Halloween, All Saints, All Souls
« Reply #19 on: October 29, 2020, 02:19:08 PM »
Don, remember that the KJV had and prescribed the Apocrypha for reading in Church as well. I’m currently using its reading schedule for Matins and Vespers. This morning’s reading was Sirach 8 and Luke 15. A few weeks ago, we read through all the book of Wisdom, including that lovely passage. Just like Lutherans kept reading (also in the services) the Apocrypha, so did the Anglicans. CPH even published Bibles into the 20th century that prescribed an “epistle” from Sirach for the Festival of the Nativity of Mary!

I was reminded of this when recently attending my son's wedding at a Catholic church and the first reading was from Tobit.  With such long tenure in the Lutheran church it is always a bit of a surprise when you hear the Apocrapha read as part of the readings.  Interestingly, the ALPB's For All the Saints, uses a LBW daily lectionary adapted from the Book of Common Prayer that includes readings from the Apocrypha.  In the introduction they note: "At a few times during the year the first lesson is from one of the books of the Apocrypha.  Many Lutherans are probably unaware that these books which are part of the canonical Scriptures for Romans Catholics were also included by Luther in his translation of the Bible as profitable to read." (Introduction, x)
Pastor Don Engebretson
St. Peter Lutheran Church of Polar (Antigo) WI

Weedon

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Re: Halloween, All Saints, All Souls
« Reply #20 on: October 29, 2020, 02:22:48 PM »
That passage from Tobit is pure gold. Also read through Tobit and Judith this fall. Lots of great stuff in them. No wonder the great Reformer labelled them “good to read.” I think Wisdom 2 is definitely in the background of the crucifixion narratives in the Gospels:

12 Therefore let us lie in wait for the righteous; because he is not for our turn, and he is clean contrary to our doings: he upbraideth us with our offending the law, and objecteth to our infamy the transgressings of our education. 13 He professeth to have the knowledge of God: and he calleth himself the child of the Lord. 14 He was made to reprove our thoughts. 15 He is grievous unto us even to behold: for his life is not like other men's, his ways are of another fashion. 16 We are esteemed of him as counterfeits: he abstaineth from our ways as from filthiness: he pronounceth the end of the just to be blessed, and maketh his boast that God is his father. 17 Let us see if his words be true: and let us prove what shall happen in the end of him. 18 For if the just man be the son of God, he will help him, and deliver him from the hand of his enemies. 19 Let us examine him with despitefulness and torture, that we may know his meekness, and prove his patience. 20 Let us condemn him with a shameful death: for by his own saying he shall be respected. 21 Such things they did imagine, and were deceived: for their own wickedness hath blinded them.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2020, 02:27:50 PM by Weedon »
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James

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Re: Halloween, All Saints, All Souls
« Reply #21 on: October 29, 2020, 02:34:28 PM »
“Oh,” he replied. “Well, when a baby is born, we place a rose on the altar.”

I said, “Yes. One rose, one service. And when a person dies, you often have flowers on the altar from the funeral service, and people take food over to help the family in the midst of their grief. You offer prayer for the person and the family during the illness; then you offer prayer for them on the Sunday following the funeral service. You do all these things for those experiencing grief at the end of a life. And you do this excellent memorial service once a year. You are celebrating the past. Celebrate the future as well.” [p. 89]
Lest we forget ... Celebrating the future includes remembering the innocent unborn whose future was terminated through the murderous sin of abortion.
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Re: Halloween, All Saints, All Souls
« Reply #22 on: October 29, 2020, 03:07:20 PM »
That passage from Tobit is pure gold. Also read through Tobit and Judith this fall. Lots of great stuff in them. No wonder the great Reformer labelled them “good to read.” I think Wisdom 2 is definitely in the background of the crucifixion narratives in the Gospels:

12 Therefore let us lie in wait for the righteous; because he is not for our turn, and he is clean contrary to our doings: he upbraideth us with our offending the law, and objecteth to our infamy the transgressings of our education. 13 He professeth to have the knowledge of God: and he calleth himself the child of the Lord. 14 He was made to reprove our thoughts. 15 He is grievous unto us even to behold: for his life is not like other men's, his ways are of another fashion. 16 We are esteemed of him as counterfeits: he abstaineth from our ways as from filthiness: he pronounceth the end of the just to be blessed, and maketh his boast that God is his father. 17 Let us see if his words be true: and let us prove what shall happen in the end of him. 18 For if the just man be the son of God, he will help him, and deliver him from the hand of his enemies. 19 Let us examine him with despitefulness and torture, that we may know his meekness, and prove his patience. 20 Let us condemn him with a shameful death: for by his own saying he shall be respected. 21 Such things they did imagine, and were deceived: for their own wickedness hath blinded them.

Good to remember that the Lutheran Confession prescribe no canon of Scripture. We could just as well use the Roman Catholic canon which Luther did. The Reformed canon is not necessarily ours.

Peace, JOHN
Pr. JOHN HANNAH, STS

Pastor Ken Kimball

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Re: Halloween, All Saints, All Souls
« Reply #23 on: October 29, 2020, 03:20:03 PM »

It is still hard for me to sing "For All The Saints" without tears.

Me too, though it remains my favorite hymn.  Particularly the last two verses, as I see in my mind's eye, the faces of family and friends entrusted to Christ in the Church Triumphant including those dear friends in Christ whom I have been privileged to pastor, especially for 26 years here at Paint Creek, whose earthly remains lie in the church yards surrounding Old East and Old West in fields strewn with a strange crop of hewn stone.  "But lo there breaks a yet more glorious day--the saints triumphant rise in bright array.  The King of glory passes on His way."   Tears of remembered grief and loss mix with tears of hope and joy anticipating and looking ahead to that great day with our God and Lord, Jesus Christ, calling us awake, gathered about Him.  To hear the Voice and see the eyes of Him Who loves us, first and last, best and always, and with Him, the Father and the Holy Spirit.  And seeing alive--and more alive than ever--those we last saw lifeless, and not just seeing but enjoying with every resurrected sense the incredible miracle of the resurrection of the body--and holy laughter and shouts of joy and triumph, and singing, oh the glorious singing that will be!  "From earth's wide bounds, from ocean's farthest coast; through gates of pearl streams in the countless host; singing to father, Son, and Holy Ghost:  Alleluia!  Alleluia!"  Tears, yes, accompanied not just by the ache of loss but with an ache and longing not just for restoration, but for the fulfillment of hope for more than I could ever have imagined.  Amen.  Come Lord Jesus.

J. Thomas Shelley

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Re: Halloween, All Saints, All Souls
« Reply #24 on: October 29, 2020, 04:56:18 PM »
The expanded Vespers with Lessons for All Hallows' Eve

Quote
ALL HALLOW’S EVE
SERVICE OF EVENING PRAYER

October 31

*   THE SERVICE OF LIGHT      pages 142-145 G
      The hand candles are lighted as the Vesper candle is carried.
      These remain lighted until the close of the prayer on page 145.


*   PSALM 141      
TUNE:  O SHENANDOAH

   Refrain:   Lord, let my pray’r
         Arise as incense
         Off’ring up
         A fragrance pleasant;
         And let me now
         Lift hands before you,
         To praise your name,
         To praise your name,
         An ev’ning sac-ri-fice.

         O Lord I cry
         To you, come quickly,
         Hear my voice
         When I call to you;
         And, let my pray’r
         Arise as incense
         Off-er-ing up
         Off-er-ing up
         A fragrance most pleasant.

         Lord, set a watch
         In front of my mouth,
         Guard the door
         Before my two lips.
         O, do not let
         My heart seek evil;
         Nor let my mind
         Be overcome
         With the wicked people.
         
         But turn my heart
         To You, Most Holy
         In you Lord,
         I take my refuge.
         O strip me not
         Of life eternal,
         For unto you,
         With Spirit, Son,
         Be the pow’r and glory.

         Refrain

*   PRAYER 

            
The Witch of Endor
   LESSON      1 Samuel 28:3-19
   PSALM 130--sung Tone # 2 alternating verses   page 281 G
   SILENCE
*   PRAYER
            
The Vision of Eliphaz the Tishbite
   LESSON      Job 4:12-21
   PSALM 108:1-6--sung Tone # 9   unison   page 269 G
   SILENCE
*   PRAYER
            
The Valley of Dry Bones
   LESSON      Ezekiel 37:1-14
   PSALM 143:1-11--sung Tone # 3 alternating verses   
               pages 285-286 G
   SILENCE
*   PRAYER
            
The War in Heaven
   LESSON      Revelation 12:7-12
   PSALM 103:17-22--sung Tone # 1 alternating verses   page 264 G
   SILENCE
*   PRAYER
   HOMILY
*   HYMN      Holy God, We Praise Your Name   # 535 G
            following the fourth verse we will sing
            the additional verses printed on the back


         Christ, you are our glor-rious King
         Son of God, enthroned in splendor;
         But deliverance to bring
         You all honor did surrender,
         And were of a virgin born
         Humbly on that Christmas morn.

         You did take the sting of death
         Son of God, as Savior given.
         On the cross your dying breath
         Opened wide the gates of heaven.
         In the glory of that land
         You are set at God’s right hand.

         As our judge you will appear
         Savior, who has died to win us;
         Help your servants, drawing near;
         Lord, renew our hearts within us,
         Grant that with your saints we may
         Live in ev-er-last-ing day.

*   THE LITANY         pages 148-151 G (right column)
*   COLLECT FOR ALL SAINTS’ DAY
*   OUR LORD’S PRAYER      page 152 G
*   BENEDICAMUS      page 152 G
*   BLESSING         page 152 G

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Chrismated Antiochian Orthodox, eve of Mary of Egypt Sunday, A.D. 2015

Richard Johnson

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Re: Halloween, All Saints, All Souls
« Reply #25 on: October 29, 2020, 07:18:20 PM »
Don, remember that the KJV had and prescribed the Apocrypha for reading in Church as well. I’m currently using its reading schedule for Matins and Vespers. This morning’s reading was Sirach 8 and Luke 15. A few weeks ago, we read through all the book of Wisdom, including that lovely passage. Just like Lutherans kept reading (also in the services) the Apocrypha, so did the Anglicans. CPH even published Bibles into the 20th century that prescribed an “epistle” from Sirach for the Festival of the Nativity of Mary!

I was reminded of this when recently attending my son's wedding at a Catholic church and the first reading was from Tobit.  With such long tenure in the Lutheran church it is always a bit of a surprise when you hear the Apocrapha read as part of the readings.  Interestingly, the ALPB's For All the Saints, uses a LBW daily lectionary adapted from the Book of Common Prayer that includes readings from the Apocrypha.  In the introduction they note: "At a few times during the year the first lesson is from one of the books of the Apocrypha.  Many Lutherans are probably unaware that these books which are part of the canonical Scriptures for Romans Catholics were also included by Luther in his translation of the Bible as profitable to read." (Introduction, x)

I've realized this year (not sure how I've missed it before) the the BCP Daily Lectionary includes several readings from the Apocrypha which the LBW Daily Lectionary (and thus  For All the Saints as well) did not pick up. So for the past few weeks I've been "double dipping," reading both the appointed BCP lesson (mostly because we've been sending out daily devotions based on the BCP lessons, and some of our writers have been using the current readings from Sirach) and the LBW version. I enjoy reading Sirach but I think the BCP short-changed the Minor Prophets.
The Rev. Richard O. Johnson, STS

James

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Re: Halloween, All Saints, All Souls
« Reply #26 on: October 29, 2020, 08:13:17 PM »
Good to remember that the Lutheran Confession prescribe no canon of Scripture. We could just as well use the Roman Catholic canon which Luther did. The Reformed canon is not necessarily ours.

Peace, JOHN
Perhaps you should read Luther a bit closer concerning the the non canonical status of the Apocrypha ...
Quote from: Martin Luther
Martin Luther’s German translation did include these books in between the Old Testament and the New Testament, with this important note: “Apocrypha: These books are not held equal to the Sacred Scriptures, and yet are useful and good for reading.”
It’s difficult to understand how one could seriously view these non canonical writings as anything but useful and good reading.

The thought of non canonical periscopes being read from the lectern on a par with the canonical scripture is tragic.

Thankfully many place their faith on the ENTIRETY of scripture rather than attempting to parse the confessions to fit one’s ecumenical desires.
If necessary, there will be a peaceful transfer of power on Jan 20, 2021.

In the event election fraud is proven in the courts of our country, there will be an inauguration ceremony ... no transfer of power necessary.

Weedon

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Re: Halloween, All Saints, All Souls
« Reply #27 on: October 29, 2020, 08:34:21 PM »
James,

I think you are quite wrong. When Martin Chemnitz sets them out in chart form in his marvelous Enchiridion, it is clear from his presentation that James and 2 Peter are in the same category as Wisdom or Sirach. My point is that the bounds of the canon have ALWAYS been loose, and that Pr. Hannah is not wrong at all to point out that Lutherans simply have no definitive canon. We don’t. I disagree with the notion that we could use the Roman Catholic Canon (which, ironically could be to adopt a definitive canon, against which Chemnitz strongly argues; the Church does not have the right to establish a canon!), but think Chemnitz’ rule (which I believe he borrowed from Eusebius) is a good one: dogma is established from the homolegomena; but any dogma so established may be confirmed from the antilegoumena. I do not believe that the LCMS in any way was being deficient when in its early 20th century Bibles it provided various first readings (called “Epistle” readings) from the Apocrypha on St. John’s Day or the Nativity of Mary. It’s entirely of a piece with the practice of Lutheran Orthodoxy, which in places such as Magdeburg (think Flacius, okay!!!) read swaths of the Apocrypha in the Daily Office every year from the lectern; or the way that Luther’s Catechism was illustrated also with woodcuts depicting the scenes from the Apocryphal writings. In fact, I just looked this up, if you were worshipping in Magdeburg on this Thursday after Trinity XX before the Massacre and sack of the city, the reading among Lutherans in the Cathedral at Matins today would be 2 Maccabees 1:18-36; at Vespers 2 Maccabees 2! Oh, and the first Vespers served for Sts. Simon and Jude would read Wisdom 3:1-8, the very passage Pr. Engebretson cited up above.

P.S. And on the Anglican side of the equation, folks need to give full weight to the original title of the KJV: The Holy Bible Containing the Old and New Testaments and the Apocrypha, Translated out of the Original Tongues and with the Former Translations Compared and Revised by His Majesty’s Special Command. ***Appointed to be read in Churches.***
« Last Edit: October 29, 2020, 09:10:11 PM by Weedon »
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Rev. Edward Engelbrecht

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Re: Halloween, All Saints, All Souls
« Reply #28 on: October 29, 2020, 09:08:32 PM »
Wonderful All Hallows' event with our neighborhood tonight. Despite Covid, despite rain, 105 children visited our stations. Great good will event. God be praised and thanked!
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D. Engebretson

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Re: Halloween, All Saints, All Souls
« Reply #29 on: October 29, 2020, 10:42:30 PM »
When I was chaplain at the IC we would always light candles on the day (if it fell M-F), commemorating as many as had asked us to remember their loved ones before the Lord. And of course, we sang: “For All the Saints.”

In our parish, we don’t light candles, but we ring the tolling bell as each name that died in the past year is commemorated during the remembrance.

Schmemann is good on this remembrance thing: “One thing is without doubt: memory is man’s capacity to “resurrect the past,” to preserve knowledge of it within himself. But we must say precisely that this capacity is ambiguous. Actually, does its essence not lie in the fact that if, on the one hand, in memory the past is surely resurrected—through it, I see a man who some time ago passed from life, I feel in all particularities that morning when I met with him or the last time I saw him, and thus I can “collect” my life—then, on the other hand, it is resurrected precisely as past, that is, as unreturnable, so that in being realized through my memory the knowledge of this past is simultaneously a discovery of its absence in the present? Hence the sorrow inherent in memory. For, in the end, memory in man is nothing other than the knowledge, peculiar to man, of death, of the fact that “death and time rule on the earth.” That is why the gift of memory is ambiguous. Through it a man simultaneously “resurrects” the past and comes to know the shatteredness of his own life, “which, circling, vanishes in the mist.”...

And much later when he delivers the goods on the Gospel: “Salvation consists in this: that in Christ—perfect God and perfect man—memory comes to reign and is restored as a lifecreating power, and in remembering, man partakes not of the experience of the fall, mortality, and death, but of the overcoming of this fall through life everlasting. For Christ Himself is the incarnation and the gift to mankind of God’s memory in all its fullness—as love directed toward each man and toward all humanity, toward the world and all creation. He is the Savior because in His memory He remembers all, and gives His own life to all as their life. But being the incarnation of the memory of God, Christ is likewise the manifestation and fulfillment of man’s perfect remembrance of God, for in this memory—love, self-sacrifice, communion with the Father—is His entire life, the entire perfection of His humanity. The essence of our faith and the new life granted in it consists in Christ’s memory, realized in us through our memory of Christ. From the very first days of Christianity, to believe in Christ meant to remember him and keep him always in mind.... (from The Eucharist).

Oh, lots more. But I thought that bit fitting for All Saints and a blessing indeed, when the Church remembers in Christ those joined to Him who now live in Him and whom He will not forget but at His resurrection raise even in their bodies. “Remember, O Lord!”

He hath remembered his mercy and his truth toward the house of Israel. Ps 98

He hath remembered his covenant for ever, the word which he commanded to a thousand generation. Psalm 105

He hath made his wonderful works to be remembered. Psalm 111

The Lord hath been mindful of us. Psalm 115

P.S. Shared this last All Saints, but it’s such a consolation, I’ll throw it out there again: https://youtu.be/ZZOkj6sjxis We used it at last Synodical Convention for the commemoration of the departed among the workers of Synod.

All Saints and the Commemoration of the Faithful (All Souls) has been historically centered in many ways on remembering.  As Eanon Duffy notes the need for remembering, especially in the medieval era, in The Stripping of the Altars - Traditional Religion in England 1400-1580: "The language of memory pervaded the cult of the dead...The focal point of the Church's liturgy of supplication for the dead, All Souls' Day, was properly called the 'Commemoration' of All Souls.  It was, of course, the desire for prayer which lay at the root of this preoccupation with remembering.  The dead needed to be remembered, for the dead were, like the poor, utterly dependent on the loving goodwill of others.  For all the stories of apparitions and Purgatory spirits walking to disturb their survivors, it was orthodox teaching that the living hold no direct converse with the dead.  For medieval people, as for us, to die meant to enter a great silence, and the fear of being forgotten in that silence was as real to them as to any of the generations that followed.  But for them that silence was not absolute and could be breached.  To find ways and means of doing so was one of their central religious preoccupations.  For what late medieval England men and women at the point of death seem most to have wanted was that their names should be kept constantly in the memory and the prayers of the living." (327-328)
« Last Edit: October 29, 2020, 10:44:51 PM by D. Engebretson »
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St. Peter Lutheran Church of Polar (Antigo) WI