Author Topic: Pete Souza: The Way I See It  (Read 103 times)

Brian Stoffregen

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Pete Souza: The Way I See It
« on: October 26, 2020, 07:50:53 PM »

Pete Souza's movie: The Way I See It was recommended to us. My sister-in-law said that two people recommended it to her. It was on MSNBC. He was a White House photographer under Presidents Reagan and Obama. As a photojournalist he remained neutral. He's neutral no longer. The humanity and openness and respect for the office he saw with the daily lives (and in his photos) of the two presidents he longer sees. He feels that he must speak out.


Some of his photos can be seen here.


https://www.petesouza.com/portfolio.html?folio=Image%20Galleries

"The church had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

Brian Stoffregen

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Re: Pete Souza: The Way I See It
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2020, 07:57:10 PM »
One key difference (nothing about presidential policies) that he sees between the presidents: he had quite open access to the presidents so he was able to get thousands of honest, candid shots of the presidents and people around them. The White House photographer now does not have access. When there are photos, they are staged, not taken while things are happening. (Although, I guess, that allowing official photographers open access to meetings and events as they happen, or not, is a policy.)
« Last Edit: October 26, 2020, 07:58:54 PM by Brian Stoffregen »
"The church had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]