Author Topic: Nuclear Family  (Read 13236 times)

Brian Stoffregen

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Re: Nuclear Family
« Reply #240 on: October 07, 2020, 01:04:05 PM »
Several decades ago, a prominent American led the charge of "It Takes a Village to Raise a Child".  Naysayers pointed out the Soviet system of taking children from their parents in rural and semi-rural areas to educate and raise them in communal utopias.  Others pointed out the then well-underway destruction of the two-parent family in poorer, dense American urban areas thought to be accelerated by misdirected governmental paternalism.
Where are we now?


I understood: "It takes a village to raise a child," to harken back to olden days where all the adults in the neighborhood, who knew each other, looked after and cared for all the children. It recognizes that raising a child includes the school system, churches, scout leaders, coaches, etc. The number of people who influence our children goes far beyond just the parents, grandparents, and other family members.
"The church … had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

Charles Austin

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Re: Nuclear Family
« Reply #241 on: October 07, 2020, 01:42:30 PM »
When I was young, the “playground“ included the four or five blocks in front of my house running to the west, my house being on the east end of the play area. Eight or nine of us kids ranged through that street and our various yards, front and back, from the time school got out in May until September. A Couple of yards, where no children lived, were off-limits. But as we played through the summer days and into the summer nights, it was clear that the nearest mother, no matter whose mother she was, could discipline any child Who got out of hand, was fighting, or used bad language or engaged in other acts of juvenile disorder. Sometimes, when a father came home from work, he would take four or five of us in his car to the Dairy Queen. Another father was a baseball coach. And sometimes older brothers or sisters would sit in on the monopoly games we played that went on for days and days. I think of those four or five blocks and the people who live there as my village.
Retired ELCA pastor. Iowa born. Now in Minnesota. Twice-vaccinated.

Dan Fienen

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Re: Nuclear Family
« Reply #242 on: October 07, 2020, 02:50:45 PM »
Society has shifted from the good old days like Charles described. There are many reasons for this. As neighborhoods have become more diverse, standards and styles of child discipline have shifted and diversified so that we are no longer as comfortable with neighbors being stand in parents and administering discipline. Perhaps neighborhoods have become less safe, or perceived as such.


One perhaps overlooked factor that has had a major impact on neighborhoods was the advent of practical and affordable air conditioning. With the indoors becoming more comfortable than the outdoors during the heat of summer, people and even kids spend less time on porches and yards.

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John_Hannah

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Re: Nuclear Family
« Reply #243 on: October 07, 2020, 04:26:20 PM »
My block (2100 Watson Avenue) in the Bronx is like that today. The kids roll their scooters, trikes, bikes up and down the block or they play "war" with their plastic weapons. Interestingly, there is a real mixture of ethnicity--African American, different Latino, Guianense, Bengali, Asian. It's a wonderful village.

Peace, JOHN
Pr. JOHN HANNAH, STS

James J Eivan

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Re: Nuclear Family
« Reply #244 on: October 07, 2020, 05:09:04 PM »
Society has shifted from the good old days like Charles described. There are many reasons for this. As neighborhoods have become more diverse, standards and styles of child discipline have shifted and diversified so that we are no longer as comfortable with neighbors being stand in parents and administering discipline. Perhaps neighborhoods have become less safe, or perceived as such.

One perhaps overlooked factor that has had a major impact on neighborhoods was the advent of practical and affordable air conditioning. With the indoors becoming more comfortable than the outdoors during the heat of summer, people and even kids spend less time on porches and yards.
Lost in the discussion is the increasing lack of respect of authority ... be it law enforcement, teachers and in the work place.  Society is more interested in protecting the ‘rights’ of fleeing perpetrators than protecting the physical safety of law enforcement officers.

It’s pleasantly surprising that the youth in Rev Hannah’s neighborhood are allowed to brandish non lethal ‘plastic weaponry’ in public. 

Students are being expelled from virtual school sessions for simply having plastic weapons (@ 4 minute mark) visibly in their virtual classroom in their own home.  The entire video provides a distressing view into abuses in the public education system.