Author Topic: Youth Catechesis Question  (Read 3349 times)

J.L. Precup

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Re: Youth Catechesis Question
« Reply #15 on: September 15, 2020, 02:13:43 PM »
I vividly remember my confirmation examination, and - then and now - it had almost nothing to do with my faith. I was very good at memorizing things and it was easy to commit the Catechism to memory, the same way I memorized poems for English class, speeches for a speech class, and dates and names for history classes.
The confirmation exam was just another pre-teen hoop I had to jump through on my way to the greater fun of being 15, 16 and 17. Getting a "learner's permit" from the Department of Motor Vehicles meant more to me at the time.
That I later came to a deeper, meaningful, sustaining and more personal faith had little to do with that Confirmation exercise. 
Your experiences may vary.
But then you no longer believe much learned during your confirmation days ... the killing babies was unheard of and a violation of the fifth commandment then ... the little heard of gay lifestyle was forbidden by the sixth commandment then ... and the biggest thing you often brag about ... during confirmation women clergy was off the table ... now you feign enlightenment to the contrary.


But carry on ... the truths taught me in confirmation remain truths today ... I learned of a changeless Christ in a changing world.

James, I am glad you passed your confirmation examination.  But now?  Does your pastor know what you are writing here?  Does he approve?  Did he train you to emphasize what you are against rather than what (or who) you are for?  More importantly, do you believe you are honoring the Christian faith by what you write here?

Good questions.  Now, let me ask them of you (substituting your confirmation pastor instead of your current pastor).

My confirmation Pastor died two years after he confirmed me.  Based on his telling my Roman Catholic father in an adult confirmation class the same year that there really isn't that much difference between Lutherans and Roman Catholics, he probably would approve of my writing. He did have to write a letter of recommendation for me to attend prep school at Concordia, Milwaukee.  He assured the registrar that I would make a fine pastor.
Keep watch, dear Lord, with those who work, or watch, or weep this night, and give your angels charge over those who sleep. Tend the sick, Lord Christ; give rest to the weary, bless the dying, soothe the suffering, pity the afflicted, shield the joyous; and all for your love's sake. Amen.

Dan Fienen

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Re: Youth Catechesis Question
« Reply #16 on: September 15, 2020, 02:17:24 PM »
About 15 or so years ago I got a series of 6 posters of the Small Catechism, I think it was from CTSFW. CPH now has a set of catechism posters available for about $30. https://www.cph.org/p-27995-small-catechism-posters-set-of-6.aspx
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Mike in Pennsylvania

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Re: Youth Catechesis Question
« Reply #17 on: September 15, 2020, 02:17:44 PM »
Mine (1962) was the last confirmation class at my LCMS congregation to have a public examination.  As near as I recall, I blew my question but was confirmed anyway.  The examination occurred during the Sunday School hour a week prior to confirmation.  The following year, our pastor despaired of what might happen with that class so much that he switched to having them write personal essays, which were read the week before when the public examination would have occurred.
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Steven W Bohler

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Re: Youth Catechesis Question
« Reply #18 on: September 15, 2020, 02:20:54 PM »
I vividly remember my confirmation examination, and - then and now - it had almost nothing to do with my faith. I was very good at memorizing things and it was easy to commit the Catechism to memory, the same way I memorized poems for English class, speeches for a speech class, and dates and names for history classes.
The confirmation exam was just another pre-teen hoop I had to jump through on my way to the greater fun of being 15, 16 and 17. Getting a "learner's permit" from the Department of Motor Vehicles meant more to me at the time.
That I later came to a deeper, meaningful, sustaining and more personal faith had little to do with that Confirmation exercise. 
Your experiences may vary.
But then you no longer believe much learned during your confirmation days ... the killing babies was unheard of and a violation of the fifth commandment then ... the little heard of gay lifestyle was forbidden by the sixth commandment then ... and the biggest thing you often brag about ... during confirmation women clergy was off the table ... now you feign enlightenment to the contrary.


But carry on ... the truths taught me in confirmation remain truths today ... I learned of a changeless Christ in a changing world.

James, I am glad you passed your confirmation examination.  But now?  Does your pastor know what you are writing here?  Does he approve?  Did he train you to emphasize what you are against rather than what (or who) you are for?  More importantly, do you believe you are honoring the Christian faith by what you write here?

Good questions.  Now, let me ask them of you (substituting your confirmation pastor instead of your current pastor).

My confirmation Pastor died two years after he confirmed me.  Based on his telling my Roman Catholic father in an adult confirmation class the same year that there really isn't that much difference between Lutherans and Roman Catholics, he probably would approve of my writing. He did have to write a letter of recommendation for me to attend prep school at Concordia, Milwaukee.  He assured the registrar that I would make a fine pastor.

1. Given what James has written about his pastor, I would guess his pastor would agree with much of what James has written.

2. Was your father taking the adult confirmation class to join the LCMS congregation?  If so, I would not be surprised that your pastor would choose to accentuate the points of agreement.  It would be interesting to know if, in the course of the instruction, your pastor did not also explain/discuss the points of disagreement. 

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Re: Youth Catechesis Question
« Reply #19 on: September 15, 2020, 04:00:08 PM »
To be honest confirmation instruction for 7th and 8th graders in the 1950's
for LCMS students was all about the ability to memorize.  Luther's Six Chief
Parts of his Small Catechism, Schwann's questions and answers which explained
the Small Catechism, and selected Bible passages.

There was not much of an attempt to apply our faith in Jesus Christ to our daily
life. Instead the pastor lectured the class on his interpretation of Schwann's
explanation of the Small Catechism.  Students who had difficulty with memorizing
felt left out and were shamed.  The Herr Pastor was  legalistic.  Hopefully, others
in the 1950's had a better experience.
Many of the adults who came to class thought that Schwann's (or some other writer's) book of explanation was The Small Catechism. They were surprised when I handed out the small pamphlet that was just Luther's Small Catechism.
The blue cover successor to the Schwann catechism was clearly titled ‘Luther’s Small Catechism with Explanation’. While I don’t have my copy close at hand, I believe it included the 20-30 page catechism ... followed by the explanation ... including questions, answers and Biblical support.


Was the catechism carrying the name of an LCMS president widely used outside the LCMS circles?  Given that Rev Stoffregen’s ministry began in the ‘70’s in the ALC, its surprising that many had knowledge of the Schwann catechism.
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In the event election fraud is proven in the courts of our country, there will be an inauguration ceremony ... no transfer of power necessary.

Brian Stoffregen

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Re: Youth Catechesis Question
« Reply #20 on: September 15, 2020, 04:49:20 PM »
To be honest confirmation instruction for 7th and 8th graders in the 1950's
for LCMS students was all about the ability to memorize.  Luther's Six Chief
Parts of his Small Catechism, Schwann's questions and answers which explained
the Small Catechism, and selected Bible passages.

There was not much of an attempt to apply our faith in Jesus Christ to our daily
life. Instead the pastor lectured the class on his interpretation of Schwann's
explanation of the Small Catechism.  Students who had difficulty with memorizing
felt left out and were shamed.  The Herr Pastor was  legalistic.  Hopefully, others
in the 1950's had a better experience.
Many of the adults who came to class thought that Schwann's (or some other writer's) book of explanation was The Small Catechism. They were surprised when I handed out the small pamphlet that was just Luther's Small Catechism.
The blue cover successor to the Schwann catechism was clearly titled ‘Luther’s Small Catechism with Explanation’. While I don’t have my copy close at hand, I believe it included the 20-30 page catechism ... followed by the explanation ... including questions, answers and Biblical support.


Was the catechism carrying the name of an LCMS president widely used outside the LCMS circles?  Given that Rev Stoffregen’s ministry began in the ‘70’s in the ALC, its surprising that many had knowledge of the Schwann catechism.


I estimate that at one congregation I served half or more of the members had been LCMS. The LCMS pastor in town at that time was ultra conservative. Women did not vote - and would never vote as long as he was pastor there. He did not believe dinosaurs existed because they are not in the Bible. The fossils in the Dinosaur National Monument (85 miles south of the town) were placed there by God to confuse unbelievers.


One of those who came to our church reported that the pastor told them in the new member class, that if they didn't agree with everything he was teaching them, they shouldn't join the congregation. They didn't agree with everything he was teaching them. My predecessor called that pastor, "My best evangelist." Many LCMS folks moved to down visited his church, then joined ours.
"The church … had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

Dan Fienen

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Re: Youth Catechesis Question
« Reply #21 on: September 15, 2020, 05:03:50 PM »
Such a great surprise that there have been LCMS pastors that are, to say the least, maladroit. That, of course, not only gives the rest of us a bad name but is representative of how all the rest of us are. There in a nut shell is all of us, if one was we all must be that way.


Naturally, the ELCA has had no pastors maladroit, or who insisted that what they taught was the absolute truth that everybody must agree, or who made essential to the Gospel what was peripheral, such as political or social issues that he/she felt strongly about.


No doubt, that is why over the years the ELCA has been growing so much more than the LCMS, or at least shrinking less.
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Charles Austin

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Re: Youth Catechesis Question
« Reply #22 on: September 15, 2020, 05:09:54 PM »
Pastor Bohler, do you have a problem with my reflections on growing up in Iowa in the 1950s?
Here’s another tidbit. Like many of my male friends, I joined the Order of DeMolay, the Masonic organization for boys. It was what people of a certain social status, or people who aspired to a certain social status did. Active I was, an officer in the chapter, and as a senior in high school, I was being groomed for entry into the Masonic Blue Lodge. But I had become concerned about the theology I was hearing among the Masons, fearing it conflicted with what I thought was good Christian doctrine. I studied Missouri Synod material on Freemasonry and was convinced by its arguments against the Lodge. So when the DeMolay Chapter said it was  “elevating” me to its Chevalier degree, I refused the honor and said I was leaving freemasonry because it conflicted with my Christian faith. Caused quite a stir in the chapter and with the men preparing me for the lodge.
My ULCA was loose on the question, But the Augustana synod had always said the clergy could not be Masons or members of an organization “That claimed for itself what God has given solely to the church,” namely teachings about God and a “plan for salvation.”
Had some fun as a DeMolay though, and our Tuxedo and White Dinner Jacket formal dances with chapters of the Rainbow Girls, The Masonic counterpart for the distaff sex, were the social events of the various seasons. The young woman who became Beloved Spouse was a rainbow girl.
Retired ELCA pastor. Iowa born. Now in Minnesota. Missing NY/NJ and trips to Europe. I despise Daylight Savings Time which serves no purpose, disrupts my quotidian body clock and (I am reliably told) severely troubles cows and other huggable farm animals.

James

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Re: Youth Catechesis Question
« Reply #23 on: September 15, 2020, 05:18:22 PM »
I vividly remember my confirmation examination, and - then and now - it had almost nothing to do with my faith. I was very good at memorizing things and it was easy to commit the Catechism to memory, the same way I memorized poems for English class, speeches for a speech class, and dates and names for history classes.
The confirmation exam was just another pre-teen hoop I had to jump through on my way to the greater fun of being 15, 16 and 17. Getting a "learner's permit" from the Department of Motor Vehicles meant more to me at the time.
That I later came to a deeper, meaningful, sustaining and more personal faith had little to do with that Confirmation exercise. 
Your experiences may vary.
But then you no longer believe much learned during your confirmation days ... the killing babies was unheard of and a violation of the fifth commandment then ... the little heard of gay lifestyle was forbidden by the sixth commandment then ... and the biggest thing you often brag about ... during confirmation women clergy was off the table ... now you feign enlightenment to the contrary.


But carry on ... the truths taught me in confirmation remain truths today ... I learned of a changeless Christ in a changing world.

James, I am glad you passed your confirmation examination.  But now?  Does your pastor know what you are writing here?  Does he approve?  Did he train you to emphasize what you are against rather than what (or who) you are for?  More importantly, do you believe you are honoring the Christian faith by what you write here?

Good questions.  Now, let me ask them of you (substituting your confirmation pastor instead of your current pastor).

My confirmation Pastor died two years after he confirmed me.  Based on his telling my Roman Catholic father in an adult confirmation class the same year that there really isn't that much difference between Lutherans and Roman Catholics, he probably would approve of my writing. He did have to write a letter of recommendation for me to attend prep school at Concordia, Milwaukee.  He assured the registrar that I would make a fine pastor.

1. Given what James has written about his pastor, I would guess his pastor would agree with much of what James has written.

2. Was your father taking the adult confirmation class to join the LCMS congregation?  If so, I would not be surprised that your pastor would choose to accentuate the points of agreement.  It would be interesting to know if, in the course of the instruction, your pastor did not also explain/discuss the points of disagreement. 
Perhaps Rev Precup failed to read that my public examination by my pastor was not for his benefit or mine ... but for the benefit of the congregation ... hardly a negative statement.

For all the other negativity surrounding public examination, we were not facing the congregation, our confirmation that day did not depend on the number of questions correctly answered.  Answering the questions publicly was less stressful than speaking publicly before high school and college peers and classmates later in life.

My confirmation pastor and all the other men I have been privileged to call pastors have always urged that we ‘contend for the faith that was once for all delivered to the saints’ (Jude 3)

My confirmation pastor contended for the faith ... and was ostracized for it.  During the Seminex days my confirmation pastor’s circuit memorialized the district convention to support all seminary students. On the floor of of the district convention he employed the Benhken rule allowing him to amend the resulting resolution to support only those students attending synodical seminaries ... an amendment that that passed by 5 or 6 votes. His name was sh*t in the circuit and mud in the district the remaining 25+ years of his ministry.  No doubt Rev Precup considers my pastor’s contending for the faith a negative ... so consider the source of the negativity accusation ... in the minds of many, the actions of my pastor were bold and a God pleasing positive.

Rev Precup, it is the heresy of the Seminex era that is the source of whatever negativity you create or perceive.  I contend for the faith that was once for all delivered to the saints ... that’s a powerful positive!
If necessary, there will be a peaceful transfer of power on Jan 20, 2021.

In the event election fraud is proven in the courts of our country, there will be an inauguration ceremony ... no transfer of power necessary.

Charles Austin

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Re: Youth Catechesis Question
« Reply #24 on: September 15, 2020, 05:27:00 PM »
P.S. And one year, because we knew how to wear a tuxedo and move with the formal manners of Fred Astaire in a 1935 movie, some of us DeMolays were recruited to be “escorts” for the contestants in the Miss Sioux City contest, ushering them on stage and down the “runway” at the pageant. That was fun.
Retired ELCA pastor. Iowa born. Now in Minnesota. Missing NY/NJ and trips to Europe. I despise Daylight Savings Time which serves no purpose, disrupts my quotidian body clock and (I am reliably told) severely troubles cows and other huggable farm animals.

James

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Re: Youth Catechesis Question
« Reply #25 on: September 15, 2020, 05:44:27 PM »
To be honest confirmation instruction for 7th and 8th graders in the 1950's
for LCMS students was all about the ability to memorize.  Luther's Six Chief
Parts of his Small Catechism, Schwann's questions and answers which explained
the Small Catechism, and selected Bible passages.

There was not much of an attempt to apply our faith in Jesus Christ to our daily
life. Instead the pastor lectured the class on his interpretation of Schwann's
explanation of the Small Catechism.  Students who had difficulty with memorizing
felt left out and were shamed.  The Herr Pastor was  legalistic.  Hopefully, others
in the 1950's had a better experience.
Many of the adults who came to class thought that Schwann's (or some other writer's) book of explanation was The Small Catechism. They were surprised when I handed out the small pamphlet that was just Luther's Small Catechism.
The blue cover successor to the Schwann catechism was clearly titled ‘Luther’s Small Catechism with Explanation’. While I don’t have my copy close at hand, I believe it included the 20-30 page catechism ... followed by the explanation ... including questions, answers and Biblical support.

Was the catechism carrying the name of an LCMS president widely used outside the LCMS circles?  Given that Rev Stoffregen’s ministry began in the ‘70’s in the ALC, its surprising that many had knowledge of the Schwann catechism.
I estimate that at one congregation I served half or more of the members had been LCMS. The LCMS pastor in town at that time was ultra conservative. Women did not vote - and would never vote as long as he was pastor there. He did not believe dinosaurs existed because they are not in the Bible. The fossils in the Dinosaur National Monument (85 miles south of the town) were placed there by God to confuse unbelievers.

One of those who came to our church reported that the pastor told them in the new member class, that if they didn't agree with everything he was teaching them, they shouldn't join the congregation. They didn't agree with everything he was teaching them. My predecessor called that pastor, "My best evangelist." Many LCMS folks moved to down visited his church, then joined ours.
Avoiding Rev Precup’s negativity, apparently the gain of additional members by you and your predecessor was a gain for both your congregation and the local LCMS congregation as well.🤩
If necessary, there will be a peaceful transfer of power on Jan 20, 2021.

In the event election fraud is proven in the courts of our country, there will be an inauguration ceremony ... no transfer of power necessary.

Dave Likeness

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Re: Youth Catechesis Question
« Reply #26 on: September 15, 2020, 05:46:52 PM »
My father was a procurement analyst for the Weapons Command at the Rock Island
Arsenal in Rock Island, Illinois.  It is a Federal Military Installation.  Early in his
career, he was approached by some Masonic Lodge members in his department to
join the Masons.  They liked his moral character and were willing to pay the fees
to make him a 33rd degree Mason.

My father politely refused and said that his Christian beliefs conflicted with the
Mason's teachings.  Today, of course the Masonic Lodge membership is down
and it is no longer seen as a stepping stone in job advancement.

J.L. Precup

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Re: Youth Catechesis Question
« Reply #27 on: September 15, 2020, 06:22:25 PM »
I vividly remember my confirmation examination, and - then and now - it had almost nothing to do with my faith. I was very good at memorizing things and it was easy to commit the Catechism to memory, the same way I memorized poems for English class, speeches for a speech class, and dates and names for history classes.
The confirmation exam was just another pre-teen hoop I had to jump through on my way to the greater fun of being 15, 16 and 17. Getting a "learner's permit" from the Department of Motor Vehicles meant more to me at the time.
That I later came to a deeper, meaningful, sustaining and more personal faith had little to do with that Confirmation exercise. 
Your experiences may vary.
But then you no longer believe much learned during your confirmation days ... the killing babies was unheard of and a violation of the fifth commandment then ... the little heard of gay lifestyle was forbidden by the sixth commandment then ... and the biggest thing you often brag about ... during confirmation women clergy was off the table ... now you feign enlightenment to the contrary.


But carry on ... the truths taught me in confirmation remain truths today ... I learned of a changeless Christ in a changing world.

James, I am glad you passed your confirmation examination.  But now?  Does your pastor know what you are writing here?  Does he approve?  Did he train you to emphasize what you are against rather than what (or who) you are for?  More importantly, do you believe you are honoring the Christian faith by what you write here?

Good questions.  Now, let me ask them of you (substituting your confirmation pastor instead of your current pastor).

My confirmation Pastor died two years after he confirmed me.  Based on his telling my Roman Catholic father in an adult confirmation class the same year that there really isn't that much difference between Lutherans and Roman Catholics, he probably would approve of my writing. He did have to write a letter of recommendation for me to attend prep school at Concordia, Milwaukee.  He assured the registrar that I would make a fine pastor.

1. Given what James has written about his pastor, I would guess his pastor would agree with much of what James has written.

2. Was your father taking the adult confirmation class to join the LCMS congregation?  If so, I would not be surprised that your pastor would choose to accentuate the points of agreement.  It would be interesting to know if, in the course of the instruction, your pastor did not also explain/discuss the points of disagreement. 
Perhaps Rev Precup failed to read that my public examination by my pastor was not for his benefit or mine ... but for the benefit of the congregation ... hardly a negative statement.

For all the other negativity surrounding public examination, we were not facing the congregation, our confirmation that day did not depend on the number of questions correctly answered.  Answering the questions publicly was less stressful than speaking publicly before high school and college peers and classmates later in life.

My confirmation pastor and all the other men I have been privileged to call pastors have always urged that we ‘contend for the faith that was once for all delivered to the saints’ (Jude 3)

My confirmation pastor contended for the faith ... and was ostracized for it.  During the Seminex days my confirmation pastor’s circuit memorialized the district convention to support all seminary students. On the floor of of the district convention he employed the Benhken rule allowing him to amend the resulting resolution to support only those students attending synodical seminaries ... an amendment that that passed by 5 or 6 votes. His name was sh*t in the circuit and mud in the district the remaining 25+ years of his ministry.  No doubt Rev Precup considers my pastor’s contending for the faith a negative ... so consider the source of the negativity accusation ... in the minds of many, the actions of my pastor were bold and a God pleasing positive.

Rev Precup, it is the heresy of the Seminex era that is the source of whatever negativity you create or perceive.  I contend for the faith that was once for all delivered to the saints ... that’s a powerful positive!

James, you're not even close to answering the question...nothing negative to it at all:  does your pastor know what you are writing here?  If he does, I'd like to have a fraternal discussion with him.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2020, 06:36:54 PM by J.L. Precup »
Keep watch, dear Lord, with those who work, or watch, or weep this night, and give your angels charge over those who sleep. Tend the sick, Lord Christ; give rest to the weary, bless the dying, soothe the suffering, pity the afflicted, shield the joyous; and all for your love's sake. Amen.

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Re: Youth Catechesis Question
« Reply #28 on: September 15, 2020, 08:08:44 PM »
I vividly remember my confirmation examination, and - then and now - it had almost nothing to do with my faith. I was very good at memorizing things and it was easy to commit the Catechism to memory, the same way I memorized poems for English class, speeches for a speech class, and dates and names for history classes.
The confirmation exam was just another pre-teen hoop I had to jump through on my way to the greater fun of being 15, 16 and 17. Getting a "learner's permit" from the Department of Motor Vehicles meant more to me at the time.
That I later came to a deeper, meaningful, sustaining and more personal faith had little to do with that Confirmation exercise. 
Your experiences may vary.
But then you no longer believe much learned during your confirmation days ... the killing babies was unheard of and a violation of the fifth commandment then ... the little heard of gay lifestyle was forbidden by the sixth commandment then ... and the biggest thing you often brag about ... during confirmation women clergy was off the table ... now you feign enlightenment to the contrary.


But carry on ... the truths taught me in confirmation remain truths today ... I learned of a changeless Christ in a changing world.

James, I am glad you passed your confirmation examination.  But now?  Does your pastor know what you are writing here?  Does he approve?  Did he train you to emphasize what you are against rather than what (or who) you are for?  More importantly, do you believe you are honoring the Christian faith by what you write here?

Good questions.  Now, let me ask them of you (substituting your confirmation pastor instead of your current pastor).

My confirmation Pastor died two years after he confirmed me.  Based on his telling my Roman Catholic father in an adult confirmation class the same year that there really isn't that much difference between Lutherans and Roman Catholics, he probably would approve of my writing. He did have to write a letter of recommendation for me to attend prep school at Concordia, Milwaukee.  He assured the registrar that I would make a fine pastor.

1. Given what James has written about his pastor, I would guess his pastor would agree with much of what James has written.

2. Was your father taking the adult confirmation class to join the LCMS congregation?  If so, I would not be surprised that your pastor would choose to accentuate the points of agreement.  It would be interesting to know if, in the course of the instruction, your pastor did not also explain/discuss the points of disagreement. 
Perhaps Rev Precup failed to read that my public examination by my pastor was not for his benefit or mine ... but for the benefit of the congregation ... hardly a negative statement.

For all the other negativity surrounding public examination, we were not facing the congregation, our confirmation that day did not depend on the number of questions correctly answered.  Answering the questions publicly was less stressful than speaking publicly before high school and college peers and classmates later in life.

My confirmation pastor and all the other men I have been privileged to call pastors have always urged that we ‘contendforthefaith that was once for all delivered to the saints’ (Jude 3)

My confirmation pastor contended for the faith ... and was ostracized for it.  During the Seminex days my confirmation pastor’s circuit memorialized the district convention to support all seminary students. On the floor of of the district convention he employed the Benhken rule allowing him to amend the resulting resolution to support only those students attending synodical seminaries ... an amendment that that passed by 5 or 6 votes. His name was sh*t in the circuit and mud in the district the remaining 25+ years of his ministry.  No doubt Rev Precup considers my pastor’s contending for the faith a negative ... so consider the source of the negativity accusation ... in the minds of many, the actions of my pastor were bold and a God pleasing positive.

Rev Precup, it is the heresy of the Seminex era that is the source of whatever negativity you create or perceive.  I contendforthefaith that was once for all delivered to the saints ... that’s a powerful positive!

James, you're not even close to answering the question...nothing negative to it at all:  does your pastor know what you are writing here?  If he does, I'd like to have a fraternal discussion with him.
Let’s see ... the pastor who baptized and confirmed me graduated CSL in the 50’s (very much aware of the brewing problems) ... confirmed me in the ‘70’s ... retired sometime before Y2K ... this is up in years if not in glory.  I’m no longer a member of that congregation ... I have not seen his name listed as a forum member .. but since almost all the time there are more guests than forum members viewing forum posts, your guess is a good as mine.


 Unless you can document a similar interest in the pastor who confirmed other forum members, it would seem I may have already provided too much information. I guess if there is a confirmation reunion next year at that congregation which recently left synod and I’m inclined to attend, I could inquire if he reads my forum posts ... if I remember🤩😂
If necessary, there will be a peaceful transfer of power on Jan 20, 2021.

In the event election fraud is proven in the courts of our country, there will be an inauguration ceremony ... no transfer of power necessary.

Steven W Bohler

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Re: Youth Catechesis Question
« Reply #29 on: September 15, 2020, 08:20:20 PM »
Pastor Bohler, do you have a problem with my reflections on growing up in Iowa in the 1950s?
Here’s another tidbit. Like many of my male friends, I joined the Order of DeMolay, the Masonic organization for boys. It was what people of a certain social status, or people who aspired to a certain social status did. Active I was, an officer in the chapter, and as a senior in high school, I was being groomed for entry into the Masonic Blue Lodge. But I had become concerned about the theology I was hearing among the Masons, fearing it conflicted with what I thought was good Christian doctrine. I studied Missouri Synod material on Freemasonry and was convinced by its arguments against the Lodge. So when the DeMolay Chapter said it was  “elevating” me to its Chevalier degree, I refused the honor and said I was leaving freemasonry because it conflicted with my Christian faith. Caused quite a stir in the chapter and with the men preparing me for the lodge.
My ULCA was loose on the question, But the Augustana synod had always said the clergy could not be Masons or members of an organization “That claimed for itself what God has given solely to the church,” namely teachings about God and a “plan for salvation.”
Had some fun as a DeMolay though, and our Tuxedo and White Dinner Jacket formal dances with chapters of the Rainbow Girls, The Masonic counterpart for the distaff sex, were the social events of the various seasons. The young woman who became Beloved Spouse was a rainbow girl.

No, I have no problems with your memories of 1950's Iowa.  I just get a kick out of how it must have prepared you for the LBGQT agenda.  After all, your wife WAS a rainbow girl.