Author Topic: Singing in Church  (Read 2517 times)

James J Eivan

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Re: Singing in Church
« Reply #30 on: June 10, 2020, 10:22:54 AM »
OK-

Homeschool science time. Everybody get a straw, and some paper to make spitballs.

Go on outside. Now, make a spitball. Put it in one end of the straw. Blow throw the straw with the same force as if you were speaking.
Mark how far it goes. Repeat 4 more times to get an average distance.

Repeat the process, but this time blow into it as if you were bellowing out "Holy, Holy, Holy."

Want to to guess which spitball traveled further?

And now you see the reason for restricting singing. I am very tempted to quote Jessie Pinkmann at this point, but will refrain.
I don't see the reason for restricting singing. Common sense says that if you exhibit no symptoms of being sick, you likely are not getting anyone else sick. Part of the Covid panic was the idea that large numbers of asymptomatic people were nevertheless spreading the disease to vulnerable populations. But that was mostly just a theory extrapolated from very sketchy, preliminary data and and one widespread anecdotal case in which a local outbreak was traced to a choir. No actual evidence I'm aware of contradicts the common sense approach. The scientific consensus seems to have solidified around the common sense idea that asymptomatic people are not spreading the disease to any alarming degree. Hence the taking of temperatures before entering hospitals. But anyone who knows anything about homeschool science knows that when some claim is counter-intuitive, it bears the burden of proof or must be accepted on faith in a trustworthy source. The idea that singing is dangerous lacks both of those criteria.   

Jus to note , this.
https://news.yahoo.com/official-walks-back-comments-asymptomatic-160348795.html
Simply indicates there is disagreement in the medical community  ... nothing new ... proceed with care for yourself and other.

peter_speckhard

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Re: Singing in Church
« Reply #31 on: June 10, 2020, 10:27:50 AM »
OK-

Homeschool science time. Everybody get a straw, and some paper to make spitballs.

Go on outside. Now, make a spitball. Put it in one end of the straw. Blow throw the straw with the same force as if you were speaking.
Mark how far it goes. Repeat 4 more times to get an average distance.

Repeat the process, but this time blow into it as if you were bellowing out "Holy, Holy, Holy."

Want to to guess which spitball traveled further?

And now you see the reason for restricting singing. I am very tempted to quote Jessie Pinkmann at this point, but will refrain.
I don't see the reason for restricting singing. Common sense says that if you exhibit no symptoms of being sick, you likely are not getting anyone else sick. Part of the Covid panic was the idea that large numbers of asymptomatic people were nevertheless spreading the disease to vulnerable populations. But that was mostly just a theory extrapolated from very sketchy, preliminary data and and one widespread anecdotal case in which a local outbreak was traced to a choir. No actual evidence I'm aware of contradicts the common sense approach. The scientific consensus seems to have solidified around the common sense idea that asymptomatic people are not spreading the disease to any alarming degree. Hence the taking of temperatures before entering hospitals. But anyone who knows anything about homeschool science knows that when some claim is counter-intuitive, it bears the burden of proof or must be accepted on faith in a trustworthy source. The idea that singing is dangerous lacks both of those criteria.   

Jus to note , this.
https://news.yahoo.com/official-walks-back-comments-asymptomatic-160348795.html
Simply indicates there is disagreement in the medical community  ... nothing new ... proceed with care for yourself and other.
The official merely says it is unknown. That is what my previous point was. Common sense ought to prevail until something counter-intuitive is known empirically via experimentation or stated by a source trustworthy enough to be accepted on faith. In this case, neither condition is present. People who think singing might be a risk can certainly avoid it, but they ought to refrain from criticizing those who are singing as though one group is acting in ignorance and the other with knowledge.

Charles Austin

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Re: Singing in Church
« Reply #32 on: June 10, 2020, 10:50:28 AM »
Today. But considering the source, it’s probably all wrong

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/09/arts/music/choirs-singing-coronavirus-safe.html
Retired ELCA pastor. Iowa born. Now in Minnesota. Twice-vaccinated.

Steven Tibbetts

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Re: Singing in Church
« Reply #33 on: June 10, 2020, 07:32:13 PM »
Homeschool science time. Everybody get a straw, and some paper to make spitballs.

Go on outside. Now, make a spitball. Put it in one end of the straw. Blow throw the straw with the same force as if you were speaking.
Mark how far it goes. Repeat 4 more times to get an average distance.

Repeat the process, but this time blow into it as if you were bellowing out "Holy, Holy, Holy."

Want to to guess which spitball traveled further?

And now you see the reason for restricting singing. I am very tempted to quote Jessie Pinkmann at this point, but will refrain.

While the opening of the straw is the same size in both instances, the opening of the mouth is not.  Furthermore, unlike the spitball, what is expelled via the mouth/voice goes in 3 dimensions.  So our home school experiment, which might be effective in demonstrating a general principle, overestimates the increase.  The "model" doesn't accurately predict actual results. 

How significantly?
The Rev. Steven Paul Tibbetts, STS
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Matt Hummel

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Re: Singing in Church
« Reply #34 on: June 10, 2020, 09:23:11 PM »
Homeschool science time. Everybody get a straw, and some paper to make spitballs.

Go on outside. Now, make a spitball. Put it in one end of the straw. Blow throw the straw with the same force as if you were speaking.
Mark how far it goes. Repeat 4 more times to get an average distance.

Repeat the process, but this time blow into it as if you were bellowing out "Holy, Holy, Holy."

Want to to guess which spitball traveled further?

And now you see the reason for restricting singing. I am very tempted to quote Jessie Pinkmann at this point, but will refrain.

While the opening of the straw is the same size in both instances, the opening of the mouth is not.  Furthermore, unlike the spitball, what is expelled via the mouth/voice goes in 3 dimensions.  So our home school experiment, which might be effective in demonstrating a general principle, overestimates the increase.  The "model" doesn't accurately predict actual results. 

How significantly?

I have, over the past few months has the opportunity to shoulder surf on a medical news aggregating service. Looking at the articles from journals like the Lancet, JAMA, NEJM, etc., there has been a great deal of information on aerosolizing and the difference that various activities make. Which is why the typical Church bathroom, with its small size and low power ventilation/filtration will pose problems. You may want to encourage people to flush with the lid down.
Matt Hummel


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