Author Topic: Life in Quarantine: One man's reflections  (Read 59138 times)

Donald_Kirchner

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Re: Life in Quarantine: One man's reflections
« Reply #15 on: March 28, 2020, 10:49:40 PM »
So, you are not "in quarantine." Right? The same situation as my parents. They are not in quarantine. Their facility has the same limitations that you describe.

They can go out. Despite our objections and dear sister's offer, Dad went grocery shopping today. I did not approve. But a guy who fought at "Hacksaw Ridge'" and worse can do pretty much whatever he wants.

You can go out. You are not "in Quarantine."

Right?
« Last Edit: March 29, 2020, 09:49:48 AM by Pr. Don Kirchner »
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peter_speckhard

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Re: Life in Quarantine: One man's reflections
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2020, 12:58:36 AM »
So, you are not "in quarantine." Right? The same situation as my parents. They are not in quarantine. Their facility has the same limitations that you describe.

They can go out. Despite our objections and dear sister's offer, Dad went grocery shopping today. I did not approve. But a guy who fought at "Hacksaw Ridge'" and worse can do pretty much do what he wants.

You can go out. You are not "in quarantine."

Right?
Please just let this thread be about reflections.

Donald_Kirchner

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Re: Life in Quarantine: One man's reflections
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2020, 01:07:47 AM »
Reflections about ... what?
Don Kirchner

"Heaven's OK, but it’s not the end of the world." Jeff Gibbs

peter_speckhard

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Re: Life in Quarantine: One man's reflections
« Reply #18 on: March 29, 2020, 01:15:29 AM »
Reflections about ... what?
Nothing. You're under no obligation to post anything whatsoever, nor to read anything posted by others.

Donald_Kirchner

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Re: Life in Quarantine: One man's reflections
« Reply #19 on: March 29, 2020, 01:20:34 AM »
One man's reflections about nothing?   :o

Am I able to comment on the topic?
« Last Edit: March 29, 2020, 01:29:23 AM by Pr. Don Kirchner »
Don Kirchner

"Heaven's OK, but it’s not the end of the world." Jeff Gibbs

John_Hannah

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Re: Life in Quarantine: One man's reflections
« Reply #20 on: March 29, 2020, 08:30:57 AM »
I thank Charles for starting this thread. It is a very good idea; it gives us an opportunity to show our better faces. I am spending my extra time doing just what the title says--reflecting.

Make no mistake. The COVID-19 crisis is most serious. I believe those medical scientists who tell us it will get worse and that it could last more than a year. That is serious! Yet I have some (faint) optimistic thoughts; after all, the glass is also "half-full."

1.   Traditional American cooperation is in high gear. The $2 Trillion relief bill is the primary proof of that, especially that it could pass unanimously in this era of deep polarization. But that devotion to cooperation is apparent in every neighborhood. Last week my immigrant neighbor (Bangladesh) next door called me to assure me that if I needed anything at all, please let them know. (It occurred to me that I am 80 after all; I don't think of that often but they are aware of it)

2.   As our elected officials weigh decisions and advocate for the life and death needs of their constituents, in my mind I reflect applying their stated reasoning to the issue of abortion. I see the weight of the arguments for life over expediency. That's not universal of course but "life" dominates our public thinking, it seems to me. We are not suddenly going to reverse abortion the month following the conclusion of our crisis but I think we will continue to inch forward and end the crisis closer than we were on January 2020.

3.   Maybe, just maybe, we will experience a sustained revival of religion. 9/11 gave us only a (very) brief revival. Corona may drive us deeper into the mysteries God and our desperate need for him. Let's wait and see.

Like everyone, I also do the ordinary. Cooking, grocery shopping, cleaning (my cleaning service is shut down), calling my talented and faithful colleagues (I'm the circuit visitor), reading what I had not gotten around to, dinng with daughter and grandson, etc.

Peace, JOHN
« Last Edit: March 29, 2020, 08:34:34 AM by John_Hannah »
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Dave Benke

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Re: Life in Quarantine: One man's reflections
« Reply #21 on: March 29, 2020, 08:31:40 AM »
In my youth, we used to sing a song called "Pass It On."  Hadn't sung it in decades, and it turns out it was popular in the West Indies.  Who knew?  So one of our members sings it annually.  Not today.  Not this spring.  The refrain is "that's how it is with God's love/once you've experienced it/you spread his love to everyone/you want to pass it on." 

Seems apropos the current contagion.  So many billions of microbes around us attempting contagion, but the one thing we do want to spread is the love of God.

The song starts "what a wondrous time is spring/when all the birds are singing..."  We are able, really for one of the first times in memory in NYC and its outer boroughs at the epicenter, to hear the birds singing.  Life chirping away, without extraneous noise interference.  Hopeful.

Dave Benke
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Dave Likeness

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Re: Life in Quarantine: One man's reflections
« Reply #22 on: March 29, 2020, 10:38:57 AM »
Unfortunately, "One man's reflections" have become another predictable
opportunity to trash the current President of the United States.

It must be a difficult balancing act for the New Jersey Transplant to pray for
and trash the President at the same time.

James J Eivan

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Re: Life in Quarantine: One man's reflections
« Reply #23 on: March 29, 2020, 12:38:11 PM »
So, you are not "in quarantine." Right? The same situation as my parents. They are not in quarantine. Their facility has the same limitations that you describe.

They can go out. Despite our objections and dear sister's offer, Dad went grocery shopping today. I did not approve. But a guy who fought at "Hacksaw Ridge'" and worse can do pretty much do what he wants.

You can go out. You are not "in quarantine."

Right?
Please just let this thread be about reflections.
Pr. Kirchner's request to clarify quarantine is valid to understanding 'reflections' ... Am almost 90 year old retired pastor friend recently left his retirement/assisted living center to attend a family funeral a few hundred miles away.  Not only was he highly discouraged from going, heavily grilled as to the destination of his travels, but when he returned he was restricted to his room for 3 days (quarantined if you will) after his return.

Yes ... understanding the intended use of quarantine is very important to understanding reflections here.

Thank you to journalist Austin for redacting the political comments ... It's always good to have political free zones.

RandyBosch

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Re: Life in Quarantine: One man's reflections
« Reply #24 on: March 29, 2020, 12:50:53 PM »
Most helpful, while on "restricted duty" as encouraged by health care professionals and almost mandated by State and local government leaders, have been daily devotions posted by our Pastors, live-streamed Sunday morning services (two, one the Traditional service and one the Contemporary service, both with complete liturgy - excepting of course any form of ersatz-Communion), wife's weekly Bible Study including group discussions continued via Zoom, mine via messaging.

One of my correspondent's shared a "Federal Reserve release of one emergency Churchill quotation" (I'm not naming the correspondent to avoid tempting anyone with off-thread stuff, but if you really, after prayer, have a need to know - DM me and I will pray over providing a link).  Here it is:

"Now this is not the end.  It is not even the beginning of the end, but it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning." (W.S. Churchill)

I am pleased that leaders are starting to plan for and equip us for a slow but competent return to a new "normal".
My hope is on the assured grace, mercy, forgiveness and salvation given to us by and through our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.
My hope is built on nothing less.

Dave Benke

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Re: Life in Quarantine: One man's reflections
« Reply #25 on: March 29, 2020, 02:15:16 PM »
Today we had quite a following for the online worship - lots of friends from around the country and indeed from other countries.  At the end, being the upbeat Lenten Sunday, we ended with "How Great Thou Art."  I got an immediate text from a member "in exile" in Southern California.  It was always here favorite, and she let me know how much she appreciated it.  These are little things, normally.  But I'm definitely of the opinion that songs, hymns and spiritual songs bear absolutely the result that St. Paul promises - gratitude (Xaris - loving-kindness, grace) proceeds through that singing. 

In other words, whatever the rest of the teaching and admonition might contain in terms of wisdom, the use of these vessels of praise and thanksgiving, our songs and hymns, bring gratitude to the fore. 

Since the choir was out of the sanctuary, the musician and I sang a duet of "O Death, Where is Thy Sting", based on the Gospel lesson - here's Randy Travis with his version:  https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=O+Death%2C+where+is+thy+sting+randy+travis+you+tube.  We also sang "Them Bones"  after the lesson from Ezekiel.  We couldn't do justice to the Delta Rhythm Boys:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mVoPG9HtYF8.  But we gave it our best shot.  Our musician has a long history of experience in the music scene.  If you watch the Delta Rhythm Boys they hardly move during the entire song - that was a burden placed on black singing groups back in the day - no extra motions in video recordings.  Be sedate.  In private sessions, on a song like this, there was plenty more animation by the group.

Dave Benke

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James J Eivan

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Re: Life in Quarantine: One man's reflections
« Reply #26 on: March 30, 2020, 12:58:07 PM »
Chapter 5: Life in Quarantine – Sunday/Monday
We “attended” church at Mt. Olivet, Minneapolis, where the highlight was a fine sermon by Dr. David Lohse. I think churches need to think beyond just “televising” what would have been a “normal” service. But we are learning things along the way.
   Our ride took us to a park on Lake Minnetonka, a pleasant diversion. Then we drove by the kids’ house and picked up (keeping distance) a plate full of freshly-smoked ribs and barbecue sauce and took them home. The food was great, though the situation was somewhat saddened by the fact that we were not eating with them.
   This morning someone on television said he didn’t like the term “social distance,” because more than ever we need “social contact.” He said he kept “physical distance,” but could still be (a little) “social” by shouting greetings or smiling at others 10 feet away. This happened on yesterday’s ride, as we would greet people in the park from the proper distance. It’s rough, but necessary.
   Sad to read in the New Jersey press about the incidents of infection and sickness there. The town where we used to live has the largest number of sicknesses in the county – 273. Other towns usually have 3-7 incidents. Our son, who works for a company that does “relief” after disasters like fires, floods, and other things that wreak havoc, says he has a couple of gallons of what he calls “nuclear power” sanitizer and cleaner. And the company gives him protective gear if he has to go to a disaster site.
   I’m suggesting via email to some folks here at Trillium Woods, that we try a Zoom meeting on Wednesday to chat and share thoughts. We’ll see what the response is. To my surprise, a number of people here are not heavily involved in online communications, although many are.
   Feeling down, I was, late at night; so I sought some relief in music. And I found it. I was looking on YouTube for the “How Great Thou Art” sung by the “Happiness Emporium,” the famed barbershop quartet from Minneapolis. Couldn’t find it; but found some really uplifting things.
   Some tech genius found how to put together a “virtual choir.” Here are young folk scattered around the country singing “Down to the River to Pray”
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=RY4CW5pte98
    And here is “In Christ Alone” and “Abendlied” by the National Lutheran Choir.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iI7IHEhhG4Y
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_NqzFGLYyo
    Of course this moving “Children of the Heavenly Father” by the choir of Concordia, Moorhead, got to me.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyPEohF6qq8
And “It Is Well With My Soul” by the Wartburg College choir, singing at a church in Nebraska, works too.
I did find “How Great Thou Art,” sung by two young teenagers, but I don’t know where. They don’t have much “stage presence,” but the voices are terrific. And if you know the traditional harmonies, you can sing any part with them. It works with this arrangement.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=plpMqBYhnpg
     Hope everyone keeps well. We must learn how to handle our mental stress for another month at least.
Additional sources of music/Bible studies KFUO

For Music Lutheran Public Radio

Also our own Rev William Weedon....
The Word of the Lord Endures Forever A Daily, Verse-by-Verse Bible Study with the Church, Past and Present www.thewordendures.org  The Word of the Lord is available on YouTube as well.

The long running Issues Ect. includes weekly studies of both the one and three year series readings.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2020, 04:45:00 PM by James Eivan »

Dave Benke

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Re: Life in Quarantine: One man's reflections
« Reply #27 on: March 30, 2020, 02:07:53 PM »
Thanks for all musical connectives.  They really help.

One of our congregation's favorites, "It Is Well With My Soul" put together now in the Virus lockdown by a group of singers from Nashville:  https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=2610692759162815&external_log_id=b60e0fa64fe31fbafe8485077e5cefb1&q=It%20is%20well%20with%20my%20soul.

V. 3
My sin, not in part, but the whole/was nailed to the cross/and I bear it no more/it is well, it is well with my soul.

Dave Benke
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James_Gale

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Re: Life in Quarantine: One man's reflections
« Reply #28 on: March 30, 2020, 03:33:25 PM »
Chapter 5: Life in Quarantine – Sunday/Monday
We “attended” church at Mt. Olivet, Minneapolis, where the highlight was a fine sermon by Dr. David Lohse. I think churches need to think beyond just “televising” what would have been a “normal” service. But we are learning things along the way.
   Our ride took us to a park on Lake Minnetonka, a pleasant diversion. Then we drove by the kids’ house and picked up (keeping distance) a plate full of freshly-smoked ribs and barbecue sauce and took them home. The food was great, though the situation was somewhat saddened by the fact that we were not eating with them.
   This morning someone on television said he didn’t like the term “social distance,” because more than ever we need “social contact.” He said he kept “physical distance,” but could still be (a little) “social” by shouting greetings or smiling at others 10 feet away. This happened on yesterday’s ride, as we would greet people in the park from the proper distance. It’s rough, but necessary.
   Sad to read in the New Jersey press about the incidents of infection and sickness there. The town where we used to live has the largest number of sicknesses in the county – 273. Other towns usually have 3-7 incidents. Our son, who works for a company that does “relief” after disasters like fires, floods, and other things that wreak havoc, says he has a couple of gallons of what he calls “nuclear power” sanitizer and cleaner. And the company gives him protective gear if he has to go to a disaster site.
   I’m suggesting via email to some folks here at Trillium Woods, that we try a Zoom meeting on Wednesday to chat and share thoughts. We’ll see what the response is. To my surprise, a number of people here are not heavily involved in online communications, although many are.
   Feeling down, I was, late at night; so I sought some relief in music. And I found it. I was looking on YouTube for the “How Great Thou Art” sung by the “Happiness Emporium,” the famed barbershop quartet from Minneapolis. Couldn’t find it; but found some really uplifting things.
Some tech genius found how to put together a “virtual choir.” Here are young folk scattered around the country singing “Down to the River to Pray”
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=RY4CW5pte98
And here is “In Christ Alone” and “Abendlied” by the National Lutheran Choir.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iI7IHEhhG4Y
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_NqzFGLYyo
Of course this moving “Children of the Heavenly Father” by the choir of Concordia, Moorhead, got to me.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_NqzFGLYyo
And “It Is Well With My Soul” by the Wartburg College choir, singing at a church in Nebraska, works too.
   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyPEohF6qq8
I did find “How Great Thou Art,” sung by two young teenagers, but I don’t know where. They don’t have much “stage presence,” but the voices are terrific. And if you know the traditional harmonies, you can sing any part with them. It works with this arrangement.
     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=plpMqBYhnpg
     Hope everyone keeps well. We must learn how to handle our mental stress for another month at least.


Thanks for this.  It's helpful.

Norman Teigen

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Re: Life in Quarantine: One man's reflections
« Reply #29 on: March 31, 2020, 07:19:08 AM »
I spent time last night on You Tube.  I viewed a number of presentations  of the hymn 'Abide With Me.'  Was surprised to learn the hymn is sung in English soccer stadiums at  championship games. NFL, please take note.
Norman Teigen