Author Topic: Norman Borlaug  (Read 4567 times)

mariemeyer

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Re: Norman Borlaug
« Reply #30 on: April 24, 2020, 08:30:26 PM »
The Lutheran Confessions talk about the lives of the saints setting examples for us. They are living lessons about the challenges of a Christian life. So how they lived would be a factor in who was set forth as an example, which is why I included Wernher von Braun. As a scientist for the Nazis, he was involved with slave labor. But he is, I would argue, an example of repentance, too. Perhaps Hollings fits into that category. That's a matter of research.

Please keep the examples coming. I wonder if the LWML Quarterly ever did biographies of faithful women. Not sure if other synod's have a similar publication.

From A Rainbow of Saris, an LWML publication.

Hanna Scherer Lutz wife of Missionary Anton Lutz, mother of eight children.  The LWML book tells the story of her partnership with Missionary Anton Lutz, one of the fist LCMS missionaries to India. He was away from home 60% of the time.  Following the birth of their fifth child she almost died due to hemorrhaging.

Juanita Becker Lutz, wife of Arnold Lutz, mother of seven children.  Together with her husband they established deaf missions in India.  During the time their children were all in Boarding School she traveled  with her husband to the various mission stations.  Their only daughter married Gary Paul.  They reurned to India to serve as houseparents to all the missionary children. Their daughter Elizabeth became a missionary to Papua New Guinea.  Their son Stephen became a medical missionary to Papua New Guinea where his widow Julie continues to serve as missionary. 

Angela Rehwinkel missionary nurse at Bethesda Lutheran Hospital in Ambur, South India. She worked with orphans, delivered numerous babies to Indian women, taught Indian Bible Women and was instrumental in bringing Dr.  Wolfgang Bulle to India.

Deaconess Rose Ziemke

Helped establish a Bible Study for girls, worked in the slums of Trivandrum, started the Lutheran Indian Mission League, started many Indian Vacation Bible Schools and set the stage for Indian Luthetran Deaconesses.

Mary Esther Otten

"Henry and Mary Esther were sent to India by the LCMS to work among the Muslims."  Mary Esther and Hank met at the Hartford School for Missions among Muslims.  Mary Esther was Methodist and planed to go to India as a medical worker.  After Hank proposed to her, she was confirmed and became his life long partner in India where she [pursued her life long dram of bringing the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the Muslims. During their time there she was a leader in the constuction of the hospital in Wandoor.

The LWML book tells much more of Mary Esther's ministry, including the death of their 14 year old son Jimmy while away at the school for missionary kids. Mary Esther continued to write tracts and book for Muslim readers.During their time in India several Muslims were baptized. Several of Hank's books were published. On February 22, 1985 hank died of a heart attack.  He was buried next to the hospital chapel.

The LCMS mission Board anticipated  (assumed) Mary Esther would return to States. She informed that she would be staying in India. She continue to serve there upon the time of her death in 1993.  During the time there she continued to translate portions of the Bible for distribution among Muslims.

There are many more stories of women who served on the mission field.  Were they well known important people?  Perhaps not in the eyes of anyone who does not have eyes to see what these women did.  I believe they touched many lives in ways that our Lord recognized.

Marie Meyer
 

Dave Likeness

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Re: Norman Borlaug
« Reply #31 on: April 24, 2020, 09:03:08 PM »
In the N.T. book of Hebrews we find the Hall Of Faith in Chapter 11
All of the 16 people named are from the the O.T.  Two women are
mentioned by name: Sarah and Rahab.   So we need to give a shout
out to these two women of great faith.

Rev. Edward Engelbrecht

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Re: Norman Borlaug
« Reply #32 on: April 25, 2020, 09:31:50 AM »
The Lutheran Confessions talk about the lives of the saints setting examples for us. They are living lessons about the challenges of a Christian life. So how they lived would be a factor in who was set forth as an example, which is why I included Wernher von Braun. As a scientist for the Nazis, he was involved with slave labor. But he is, I would argue, an example of repentance, too. Perhaps Hollings fits into that category. That's a matter of research.

Please keep the examples coming. I wonder if the LWML Quarterly ever did biographies of faithful women. Not sure if other synod's have a similar publication.

From A Rainbow of Saris, an LWML publication.

Hanna Scherer Lutz wife of Missionary Anton Lutz, mother of eight children.  The LWML book tells the story of her partnership with Missionary Anton Lutz, one of the fist LCMS missionaries to India. He was away from home 60% of the time.  Following the birth of their fifth child she almost died due to hemorrhaging.

Juanita Becker Lutz, wife of Arnold Lutz, mother of seven children.  Together with her husband they established deaf missions in India.  During the time their children were all in Boarding School she traveled  with her husband to the various mission stations.  Their only daughter married Gary Paul.  They reurned to India to serve as houseparents to all the missionary children. Their daughter Elizabeth became a missionary to Papua New Guinea.  Their son Stephen became a medical missionary to Papua New Guinea where his widow Julie continues to serve as missionary. 

Angela Rehwinkel missionary nurse at Bethesda Lutheran Hospital in Ambur, South India. She worked with orphans, delivered numerous babies to Indian women, taught Indian Bible Women and was instrumental in bringing Dr.  Wolfgang Bulle to India.

Deaconess Rose Ziemke

Helped establish a Bible Study for girls, worked in the slums of Trivandrum, started the Lutheran Indian Mission League, started many Indian Vacation Bible Schools and set the stage for Indian Luthetran Deaconesses.

Mary Esther Otten

"Henry and Mary Esther were sent to India by the LCMS to work among the Muslims."  Mary Esther and Hank met at the Hartford School for Missions among Muslims.  Mary Esther was Methodist and planed to go to India as a medical worker.  After Hank proposed to her, she was confirmed and became his life long partner in India where she [pursued her life long dram of bringing the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the Muslims. During their time there she was a leader in the constuction of the hospital in Wandoor.

The LWML book tells much more of Mary Esther's ministry, including the death of their 14 year old son Jimmy while away at the school for missionary kids. Mary Esther continued to write tracts and book for Muslim readers.During their time in India several Muslims were baptized. Several of Hank's books were published. On February 22, 1985 hank died of a heart attack.  He was buried next to the hospital chapel.

The LCMS mission Board anticipated  (assumed) Mary Esther would return to States. She informed that she would be staying in India. She continue to serve there upon the time of her death in 1993.  During the time there she continued to translate portions of the Bible for distribution among Muslims.

There are many more stories of women who served on the mission field.  Were they well known important people?  Perhaps not in the eyes of anyone who does not have eyes to see what these women did.  I believe they touched many lives in ways that our Lord recognized.

Marie Meyer
 

Marie, this is wonderful. Thanks for presenting this. With more research I'm sure we could discover a host of faithful Lutheran women who have served the Lord alongside the men over the centuries. I really think there is a potential book project here focused on laity, who are commonly overlooked when we write church history. I could see a threefold market for such a work, depending on the writing: (1) Inspirational Confirmation gift, (2) Inspirational adult reading, (3) Bible class book with an added discussion guide.
I serve as administrator for www.churchhistoryreview.org.

Charles Austin

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Re: Norman Borlaug
« Reply #33 on: April 25, 2020, 09:33:30 AM »
And Marie has shown here that she is an elegant writer. Maybe she should do it.
Retired ELCA Pastor. Iowa native. Oh, my. How close we were to a situation where many people with guns could’ve killed many members of Congress. The possible result? Martial law and/or Civil War. Thank God some people are still coming forward to tell the truth.

Rev. Edward Engelbrecht

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Re: Norman Borlaug
« Reply #34 on: April 25, 2020, 10:46:20 AM »
And Marie has shown here that she is an elegant writer. Maybe she should do it.

I agree. If the moderators think the idea has merit, perhaps they will share the idea with whoever manages book publications for ALPB.
I serve as administrator for www.churchhistoryreview.org.