Author Topic: Coronavirus news  (Read 474030 times)

Steven W Bohler

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Re: Coronavirus news
« Reply #5025 on: September 29, 2021, 06:22:42 PM »
https://thefederalist.com/2021/09/29/youtube-purges-accounts-videos-casting-any-doubt-on-covid-vaccines/

This is the worst response to the vaccination problem. It actually exacerbates the central trust issues and validates every conspiracy theorist in his own mind.

I'm a recent Tik Tok subscriber and feed swiper.  It's just a rolling set of short videos.  But they do have some humorous takes on the animal medicines that people are taking instead of being vaccinated.  Ivermectin - for parasites in chickens.  The chicken owners must be pretty hacked off that there is no ivermectin left for the parasites afflicting their chickens. 

Speaking of which, Chick Fil A has an app in these parts connected to a contest at Mets home games (only two left!).  So they have a home run contest for kids hitting whiffle balls out in a mini ballpark beyond the center field wall.  If a kid, with dad/parent placing balls on a tee, hits 12 or more homers in 30 seconds, everyone in NY Metro gets a free Chick Fil A sandwich the next day (with the app).  Tomorrow night a Missouri Synod Lutheran boy and dad will be making their bid.  Prayers appreciated both for the unprotected chickens and the boy with a bat.

Dave Benke

I took my baby gerbils in to the vet the other day (the pet store told me the two adults I bought in July were both males, but then where did these babies come from?) and saw a poster that informed me that Ivermectin is also in Heartgard (to prevent heart worm in dogs).  And when my neighbor talked about it, she said it was for worming horses. 

DeHall1

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Re: Coronavirus news
« Reply #5026 on: September 29, 2021, 06:24:08 PM »
https://thefederalist.com/2021/09/29/youtube-purges-accounts-videos-casting-any-doubt-on-covid-vaccines/

This is the worst response to the vaccination problem. It actually exacerbates the central trust issues and validates every conspiracy theorist in his own mind.

I'm a recent Tik Tok subscriber and feed swiper.  It's just a rolling set of short videos.  But they do have some humorous takes on the animal medicines that people are taking instead of being vaccinated.  Ivermectin - for parasites in chickens.  The chicken owners must be pretty hacked off that there is no ivermectin left for the parasites afflicting their chickens. 

Speaking of which, Chick Fil A has an app in these parts connected to a contest at Mets home games (only two left!).  So they have a home run contest for kids hitting whiffle balls out in a mini ballpark beyond the center field wall.  If a kid, with dad/parent placing balls on a tee, hits 12 or more homers in 30 seconds, everyone in NY Metro gets a free Chick Fil A sandwich the next day (with the app).  Tomorrow night a Missouri Synod Lutheran boy and dad will be making their bid.  Prayers appreciated both for the unprotected chickens and the boy with a bat.

Dave Benke

Ivermectin IS for humans as well -- to treat a variety of parasitic infections. It is also currently being investigated as a potential COVID-19 treatment in at least 1 clinical trial.

See:
https://www.drugs.com/ivermectin.html

I think it's a bit more reliable than Tik Tok.



Brian Stoffregen

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Re: Coronavirus news
« Reply #5027 on: September 30, 2021, 01:31:29 AM »
https://thefederalist.com/2021/09/29/youtube-purges-accounts-videos-casting-any-doubt-on-covid-vaccines/

This is the worst response to the vaccination problem. It actually exacerbates the central trust issues and validates every conspiracy theorist in his own mind.

Way to get people thinking that “They” must be afraid of the truth.
Not only that, but game theory as I understand it says that the society as a whole acts in ways closer to the truth when every kook and crackpot’s opinions are factored in, however slightly. Telling people they’re only allowed to look at the educated, reasonable opinions reduces the effectiveness of the whole.

I’m in a NFL pool picking all the games against the spread. It is spooky how accurate the spreads tend to be. But a top expert analyst does not tend to be more accurate than the aggregate of non-expert bets. And I think game theory would postulate that insisting the bettors had some minimum degree of expertise would not make the spreads more accurate.

Societies engage in all kinds of complex actions that amount to the aggregate of millions of little decisions. I think those societal actions end up being better when those millions of decisions are made freely however people want to make them, with their various trust levels, biases, hunches, etc. free to roam. Information has to be free. The one refusing to get vaccinated because his horoscope said not to or the one getting vaccinated due to sexual fantasies about nurses are nevertheless contributors to aggregate effectiveness of societal action. Informing people is good, but trying to forcibly prevent other, more stupid sources like horoscopes from informing them is counter-productive.

I can see censorship on slander and pornography grounds. But censorship of viewpoints, opinions, and even fake “facts” makes any society weaker.


So, according to your logic, the church fathers shouldn't have silenced the heretics. Censorship of their viewpoints, opinions, and even fake "facts" made the church weaker.


And, the LCMS shouldn't have been afraid of some of the "moderate" professors at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis in the early 70s. Censorship of their viewpoints, opinions, and even fake "facts" made the denomination weaker.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2021, 01:34:56 AM by Brian Stoffregen »
"The church … had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

Matt Hummel

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Re: Coronavirus news
« Reply #5028 on: September 30, 2021, 06:20:56 AM »
https://thefederalist.com/2021/09/29/youtube-purges-accounts-videos-casting-any-doubt-on-covid-vaccines/

This is the worst response to the vaccination problem. It actually exacerbates the central trust issues and validates every conspiracy theorist in his own mind.

Way to get people thinking that “They” must be afraid of the truth.
Not only that, but game theory as I understand it says that the society as a whole acts in ways closer to the truth when every kook and crackpot’s opinions are factored in, however slightly. Telling people they’re only allowed to look at the educated, reasonable opinions reduces the effectiveness of the whole.

I’m in a NFL pool picking all the games against the spread. It is spooky how accurate the spreads tend to be. But a top expert analyst does not tend to be more accurate than the aggregate of non-expert bets. And I think game theory would postulate that insisting the bettors had some minimum degree of expertise would not make the spreads more accurate.

Societies engage in all kinds of complex actions that amount to the aggregate of millions of little decisions. I think those societal actions end up being better when those millions of decisions are made freely however people want to make them, with their various trust levels, biases, hunches, etc. free to roam. Information has to be free. The one refusing to get vaccinated because his horoscope said not to or the one getting vaccinated due to sexual fantasies about nurses are nevertheless contributors to aggregate effectiveness of societal action. Informing people is good, but trying to forcibly prevent other, more stupid sources like horoscopes from informing them is counter-productive.

I can see censorship on slander and pornography grounds. But censorship of viewpoints, opinions, and even fake “facts” makes any society weaker.


So, according to your logic, the church fathers shouldn't have silenced the heretics. Censorship of their viewpoints, opinions, and even fake "facts" made the church weaker.


And, the LCMS shouldn't have been afraid of some of the "moderate" professors at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis in the early 70s. Censorship of their viewpoints, opinions, and even fake "facts" made the denomination weaker.

And once again your patented comparison of apples to orangutans  (at least oranges are fruits. You know, like tomatoes, but we digress.)

Anyone who wanted to follow the “moderates” did. No one stopped the formation of Seminex or forbade publication, etc. There is a difference between “not under my roof” and “not at all.” And like it or not YouTube has become a public space. There is no real alternative to which one can easily turn.
Matt Hummel


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MaddogLutheran

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Re: Coronavirus news
« Reply #5029 on: September 30, 2021, 08:35:38 AM »
Speaking of which, Chick Fil A has an app in these parts connected to a contest at Mets home games (only two left!).  So they have a home run contest for kids hitting whiffle balls out in a mini ballpark beyond the center field wall.  If a kid, with dad/parent placing balls on a tee, hits 12 or more homers in 30 seconds, everyone in NY Metro gets a free Chick Fil A sandwich the next day (with the app).  Tomorrow night a Missouri Synod Lutheran boy and dad will be making their bid.  Prayers appreciated both for the unprotected chickens and the boy with a bat.

Dave Benke
Sounds like a high pressure gig for a little guy hitting whiffle balls. At least you’re not in Philadelphia, where they’d probably boo him for not winning them a sandwich.
Are you perhaps unfamiliar with the fact that the new ALPB president and his fellow Mets fans were booed by their own players this season? Philadelphia certainly has no monopoly on such behavior.  #PhilliesFinalDay  8)
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Donald_Kirchner

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Re: Coronavirus news
« Reply #5030 on: September 30, 2021, 09:27:27 AM »
https://thefederalist.com/2021/09/29/youtube-purges-accounts-videos-casting-any-doubt-on-covid-vaccines/

This is the worst response to the vaccination problem. It actually exacerbates the central trust issues and validates every conspiracy theorist in his own mind.

Way to get people thinking that “They” must be afraid of the truth.
Not only that, but game theory as I understand it says that the society as a whole acts in ways closer to the truth when every kook and crackpot’s opinions are factored in, however slightly. Telling people they’re only allowed to look at the educated, reasonable opinions reduces the effectiveness of the whole.

I’m in a NFL pool picking all the games against the spread. It is spooky how accurate the spreads tend to be. But a top expert analyst does not tend to be more accurate than the aggregate of non-expert bets. And I think game theory would postulate that insisting the bettors had some minimum degree of expertise would not make the spreads more accurate.

Societies engage in all kinds of complex actions that amount to the aggregate of millions of little decisions. I think those societal actions end up being better when those millions of decisions are made freely however people want to make them, with their various trust levels, biases, hunches, etc. free to roam. Information has to be free. The one refusing to get vaccinated because his horoscope said not to or the one getting vaccinated due to sexual fantasies about nurses are nevertheless contributors to aggregate effectiveness of societal action. Informing people is good, but trying to forcibly prevent other, more stupid sources like horoscopes from informing them is counter-productive.

I can see censorship on slander and pornography grounds. But censorship of viewpoints, opinions, and even fake “facts” makes any society weaker.


So, according to your logic, the church fathers shouldn't have silenced the heretics. Censorship of their viewpoints, opinions, and even fake "facts" made the church weaker.

And, the LCMS shouldn't have been afraid of some of the "moderate" professors at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis in the early 70s. Censorship of their viewpoints, opinions, and even fake "facts" made the denomination weaker.

No, Brian. That's according to your illogic.  ::)
Don Kirchner

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David Garner

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Re: Coronavirus news
« Reply #5031 on: September 30, 2021, 10:53:31 AM »
https://thefederalist.com/2021/09/29/youtube-purges-accounts-videos-casting-any-doubt-on-covid-vaccines/

This is the worst response to the vaccination problem. It actually exacerbates the central trust issues and validates every conspiracy theorist in his own mind.

Way to get people thinking that “They” must be afraid of the truth.
Not only that, but game theory as I understand it says that the society as a whole acts in ways closer to the truth when every kook and crackpot’s opinions are factored in, however slightly. Telling people they’re only allowed to look at the educated, reasonable opinions reduces the effectiveness of the whole.

I’m in a NFL pool picking all the games against the spread. It is spooky how accurate the spreads tend to be. But a top expert analyst does not tend to be more accurate than the aggregate of non-expert bets. And I think game theory would postulate that insisting the bettors had some minimum degree of expertise would not make the spreads more accurate.

Societies engage in all kinds of complex actions that amount to the aggregate of millions of little decisions. I think those societal actions end up being better when those millions of decisions are made freely however people want to make them, with their various trust levels, biases, hunches, etc. free to roam. Information has to be free. The one refusing to get vaccinated because his horoscope said not to or the one getting vaccinated due to sexual fantasies about nurses are nevertheless contributors to aggregate effectiveness of societal action. Informing people is good, but trying to forcibly prevent other, more stupid sources like horoscopes from informing them is counter-productive.

I can see censorship on slander and pornography grounds. But censorship of viewpoints, opinions, and even fake “facts” makes any society weaker.


So, according to your logic, the church fathers shouldn't have silenced the heretics. Censorship of their viewpoints, opinions, and even fake "facts" made the church weaker.


And, the LCMS shouldn't have been afraid of some of the "moderate" professors at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis in the early 70s. Censorship of their viewpoints, opinions, and even fake "facts" made the denomination weaker.

There is an obvious difference between the Church's authority to define its teachings and the state's authority to force people to inject chemicals into their bodies.

Whether (and how) the Church should have handled heretics is obviously a reasonable matter to discuss.  I think most of us here would prefer simple expulsion from the Church and anathemas to address the heretical teachings as opposed to, say, medieval practices of execution, burning at the stake, etc.  But I'd wager none of us thinks the state ought to bind heretics to believe what the Church teaches.  If someone steps up and disagrees, I'll stand corrected.  Meanwhile, the comparison is apt in this way -- there is one side in this discussion that advocates the state forcing people to take medication against their will, and wishes to use any method of compulsion -- shame, bankruptcy, dishonor, force -- to achieve it.  And it isn't the side that will defend the Church's right, as a voluntary association, to freely choose its own doctrine.
Orthodox Reader and former Lutheran (LCMS and WELS).

Dave Benke

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Re: Coronavirus news
« Reply #5032 on: September 30, 2021, 12:02:38 PM »
https://thefederalist.com/2021/09/29/youtube-purges-accounts-videos-casting-any-doubt-on-covid-vaccines/

This is the worst response to the vaccination problem. It actually exacerbates the central trust issues and validates every conspiracy theorist in his own mind.

Way to get people thinking that “They” must be afraid of the truth.
Not only that, but game theory as I understand it says that the society as a whole acts in ways closer to the truth when every kook and crackpot’s opinions are factored in, however slightly. Telling people they’re only allowed to look at the educated, reasonable opinions reduces the effectiveness of the whole.

I’m in a NFL pool picking all the games against the spread. It is spooky how accurate the spreads tend to be. But a top expert analyst does not tend to be more accurate than the aggregate of non-expert bets. And I think game theory would postulate that insisting the bettors had some minimum degree of expertise would not make the spreads more accurate.

Societies engage in all kinds of complex actions that amount to the aggregate of millions of little decisions. I think those societal actions end up being better when those millions of decisions are made freely however people want to make them, with their various trust levels, biases, hunches, etc. free to roam. Information has to be free. The one refusing to get vaccinated because his horoscope said not to or the one getting vaccinated due to sexual fantasies about nurses are nevertheless contributors to aggregate effectiveness of societal action. Informing people is good, but trying to forcibly prevent other, more stupid sources like horoscopes from informing them is counter-productive.

I can see censorship on slander and pornography grounds. But censorship of viewpoints, opinions, and even fake “facts” makes any society weaker.


So, according to your logic, the church fathers shouldn't have silenced the heretics. Censorship of their viewpoints, opinions, and even fake "facts" made the church weaker.


And, the LCMS shouldn't have been afraid of some of the "moderate" professors at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis in the early 70s. Censorship of their viewpoints, opinions, and even fake "facts" made the denomination weaker.

There is an obvious difference between the Church's authority to define its teachings and the state's authority to force people to inject chemicals into their bodies.

Whether (and how) the Church should have handled heretics is obviously a reasonable matter to discuss.  I think most of us here would prefer simple expulsion from the Church and anathemas to address the heretical teachings as opposed to, say, medieval practices of execution, burning at the stake, etc.  But I'd wager none of us thinks the state ought to bind heretics to believe what the Church teaches.  If someone steps up and disagrees, I'll stand corrected.  Meanwhile, the comparison is apt in this way -- there is one side in this discussion that advocates the state forcing people to take medication against their will, and wishes to use any method of compulsion -- shame, bankruptcy, dishonor, force -- to achieve it.  And it isn't the side that will defend the Church's right, as a voluntary association, to freely choose its own doctrine.

State shaming and dishonoring, in my opinion, have to be somewhat disconnected from bankruptcy and raw force.  The actual power is in financial penalty or criminal charges.  The attempt is to add social constructs to that actual power in shaming or dishonoring.  Take the Big Gulp shaming here in New York under Mike Bloomberg.  The power end was to stop 7-11 from selling the Big Gulp as a way to keep people from guzzling so much soda.  The shaming aspect never really worked.  It became a joke.  And the whole thing kind of collapsed.

At the same time, two other realities converge around the topic.  From the free marketplace perspective, at least here, our good friends at McDonald's now charge the same for any size drink.  Off the dollar menu, it's all $1.00.  Wait a minute then, right?  This means they were always making a big gulp boatload of money on the big gulp, but maybe even more percentage-wise on the small beverage.  But - if the big gulp size now costs the same as the small or medium, the amount of soda guzzled becomes the responsibility of - the consumer.

But - is there an epidemic of obesity and accompanying heart and health issues - diabetes, etc. - in the country?  Definitely.  I observe from what happens among poorer populations, who are denizens of the fast food places.  It costs more and brings worse health.  So there's a point in discussing how to present better healthy eating and drinking habits, too.  Our daycare kids receive their meals through public-funded programs, and they are invariably and mandatorily healthy foods.  After three weeks, we had to send out a letter strongly encouraging the parents to send healthier snacks for the kids, because it was all cheetos and chips and cookies, whatever the child gets/demands at home.  This is done not as a mandate but as an encouragement.  In terms of education, the kids perform and interact better when they eat more healthy food, very visibly, even at age 3 and 4.

So - I'm happy that our food providers are mandated to bring healthy food to the kids in our school.  I'm happy that the beverages we serve to those children are also healthy and come in the same mandatory menus.  At the same time, I still drink soda myself.  Oh what fools these mortals be.  My dentist - he's the happy guy.


Dave Benke

Brian Stoffregen

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Re: Coronavirus news
« Reply #5033 on: September 30, 2021, 12:13:46 PM »
https://thefederalist.com/2021/09/29/youtube-purges-accounts-videos-casting-any-doubt-on-covid-vaccines/

This is the worst response to the vaccination problem. It actually exacerbates the central trust issues and validates every conspiracy theorist in his own mind.

Way to get people thinking that “They” must be afraid of the truth.
Not only that, but game theory as I understand it says that the society as a whole acts in ways closer to the truth when every kook and crackpot’s opinions are factored in, however slightly. Telling people they’re only allowed to look at the educated, reasonable opinions reduces the effectiveness of the whole.

I’m in a NFL pool picking all the games against the spread. It is spooky how accurate the spreads tend to be. But a top expert analyst does not tend to be more accurate than the aggregate of non-expert bets. And I think game theory would postulate that insisting the bettors had some minimum degree of expertise would not make the spreads more accurate.

Societies engage in all kinds of complex actions that amount to the aggregate of millions of little decisions. I think those societal actions end up being better when those millions of decisions are made freely however people want to make them, with their various trust levels, biases, hunches, etc. free to roam. Information has to be free. The one refusing to get vaccinated because his horoscope said not to or the one getting vaccinated due to sexual fantasies about nurses are nevertheless contributors to aggregate effectiveness of societal action. Informing people is good, but trying to forcibly prevent other, more stupid sources like horoscopes from informing them is counter-productive.

I can see censorship on slander and pornography grounds. But censorship of viewpoints, opinions, and even fake “facts” makes any society weaker.


So, according to your logic, the church fathers shouldn't have silenced the heretics. Censorship of their viewpoints, opinions, and even fake "facts" made the church weaker.


And, the LCMS shouldn't have been afraid of some of the "moderate" professors at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis in the early 70s. Censorship of their viewpoints, opinions, and even fake "facts" made the denomination weaker.

There is an obvious difference between the Church's authority to define its teachings and the state's authority to force people to inject chemicals into their bodies.

Whether (and how) the Church should have handled heretics is obviously a reasonable matter to discuss.  I think most of us here would prefer simple expulsion from the Church and anathemas to address the heretical teachings as opposed to, say, medieval practices of execution, burning at the stake, etc.  But I'd wager none of us thinks the state ought to bind heretics to believe what the Church teaches.  If someone steps up and disagrees, I'll stand corrected.  Meanwhile, the comparison is apt in this way -- there is one side in this discussion that advocates the state forcing people to take medication against their will, and wishes to use any method of compulsion -- shame, bankruptcy, dishonor, force -- to achieve it.  And it isn't the side that will defend the Church's right, as a voluntary association, to freely choose its own doctrine.


Do you think it's proper for the state to force people to drive the speed limit; to wear seat belts; to have tobacco companies put warnings on cigarettes; and a whole host of other mandates that are designed to keep us and our neighbors safe?


Back when heretics were executed, there was little to no difference between the church and the state. Remember that the Council of Nicaea was called by the Roman Emperor, not by the clerics.
"The church … had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

David Garner

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Re: Coronavirus news
« Reply #5034 on: September 30, 2021, 12:22:26 PM »
Do you think it's proper for the state to force people to drive the speed limit; to wear seat belts; to have tobacco companies put warnings on cigarettes; and a whole host of other mandates that are designed to keep us and our neighbors safe?

Back when heretics were executed, there was little to no difference between the church and the state. Remember that the Council of Nicaea was called by the Roman Emperor, not by the clerics.

Once again, there are differences you refuse to see in all those things.  The state does not enforce speed limits or seatbelts on private property, but rather only on the public roadways.  A warning on a cigarette package is not the same as forbidding someone from smoking cigarettes.  Further, asking you to refrain from smoking in certain areas in public is not the same as forcing someone to undergo a vaccine to go anywhere.  Smoking is still allowed in bars, in designated areas at stadiums, etc., despite the public health risks.  Moreover, refraining from smoking harms the person being asked to refrain little, whereas injecting a vaccine can actually harm the person.

As for your last paragraph, can you tell me which canons of Nicea were imposed by the Emperor?  For that matter, can you tell us about the Emperor's participation in that Council (i.e., what did he do there?)?
Orthodox Reader and former Lutheran (LCMS and WELS).

Randy Bosch

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Re: Coronavirus news
« Reply #5035 on: September 30, 2021, 01:02:26 PM »
Ivermectin has been soundly denied to be a reasonable treatment for those with mild cases of Coronavirus by many in the mainstream media/public medical sphere in the US.  The following, lengthy reporting of the effects of Ivermectin treatment in a wide variety of countries is intriguing:
https://covid19criticalcare.com/ivermectin-in-covid-19/epidemiologic-analyses-on-covid19-and-ivermectin/

Randy Bosch

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Re: Coronavirus news
« Reply #5036 on: September 30, 2021, 01:04:58 PM »
Another statistical misapplication in Great Britain's surge in COVID infections among the returning to school population is simple to explain if you apply reason to reports.  From the study in my previous post:

"The drop in the UK is quite different and it isn’t a mystery either. The massive surge in cases was driven by children and young adults. Students were testing themselves two or more times per week. The same child with COVID could be counted multiple times. The last school period went from the end of May up until July 15. The surge in cases started at the end of May and on July 17 cases dropped. The school period and the surge match perfectly."


Brian Stoffregen

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Re: Coronavirus news
« Reply #5037 on: September 30, 2021, 01:32:43 PM »
Do you think it's proper for the state to force people to drive the speed limit; to wear seat belts; to have tobacco companies put warnings on cigarettes; and a whole host of other mandates that are designed to keep us and our neighbors safe?

Back when heretics were executed, there was little to no difference between the church and the state. Remember that the Council of Nicaea was called by the Roman Emperor, not by the clerics.

Once again, there are differences you refuse to see in all those things.  The state does not enforce speed limits or seatbelts on private property, but rather only on the public roadways.  A warning on a cigarette package is not the same as forbidding someone from smoking cigarettes.  Further, asking you to refrain from smoking in certain areas in public is not the same as forcing someone to undergo a vaccine to go anywhere.  Smoking is still allowed in bars, in designated areas at stadiums, etc., despite the public health risks.  Moreover, refraining from smoking harms the person being asked to refrain little, whereas injecting a vaccine can actually harm the person.

As for your last paragraph, can you tell me which canons of Nicea were imposed by the Emperor?  For that matter, can you tell us about the Emperor's participation in that Council (i.e., what did he do there?)?


As I understand it, the Emperor called for the Council. He didn't participate in it; he created its existence as a way to try and unite his empire under a common (Christian) religion. My point was that there was little difference between Church and State, which led to the many State Churches in Europe. Up until fairly recently, everyone born in Sweden was considered a Lutheran. It didn't matter if one was baptized or attended worship. Being born within its borders was the important thing. This mindset has led people to claim that America is a "Christian Nation," which it isn't.
"The church … had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

DeHall1

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Re: Coronavirus news
« Reply #5038 on: October 01, 2021, 03:21:36 PM »
Here's some interesting news about studies using oral antivirals to combat COVID-19 in it's early stages (thing Tamiflu for treating flu symptoms):

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/a-pill-to-treat-covid-19-we-re-talking-about-a-return-to-maybe-normal-life/ar-AAOSro2?ocid=entnewsntp

JEdwards

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Re: Coronavirus news
« Reply #5039 on: October 01, 2021, 08:58:52 PM »
Ivermectin has been soundly denied to be a reasonable treatment for those with mild cases of Coronavirus by many in the mainstream media/public medical sphere in the US.  The following, lengthy reporting of the effects of Ivermectin treatment in a wide variety of countries is intriguing:
https://covid19criticalcare.com/ivermectin-in-covid-19/epidemiologic-analyses-on-covid19-and-ivermectin/
This is pure post hoc, ergo propter hoc fallacy. The evidence supporting masking, while admittedly limited, is way more rigorous than this. Here is a report of how ivermectin fared (spoiler alert: not well) in a randomized, double-blind trial:

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2777389

Peace,
Jon