Author Topic: Looming Shortage of Pastors - Worse Than We Realized?  (Read 14807 times)

GalRevRedux

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Re: Looming Shortage of Pastors - Worse Than We Realized?
« Reply #165 on: July 02, 2019, 03:48:18 PM »


My best friend these days is my former parish worker who was widowed long before I knew her. We have a comfortable friendship. Just last Sunday I told her that the hardest thing for me right now is the sense that nobody really needs me anymore. My interim is over, my step kids are grown and quite independent, etc. I do think this feeling is born of grief, and will eventually dissolve into some new purpose. I am relearning how to lean into God’s unfailing strength and guidance. Right now, though, I feel like I am in free fall. This thread has been helpful, because I do not feel quite so isolated in some of my feelings.

Saying that I feel unneeded felt almost blasphemous. God will show me the needs.

Donna

Donna, trust the Lord who brought you this far. I retired four years ago. I was weary of the abuse I received from a small number of people. I was tired of cleaning floors and fixing plumbing when no one would do it. I hung on as long as I did because I was afraid to live without the vocation that had given me an identity for 39 years. I have been amazed in retirement how often people from local congregations to the bishop call on me to exercise my vocation still. To my surprise I preach frequently, I've even done Easter and Christmas services and funerals. I've know you for a long time, and I'm sure God isn't finished with you yet.
[/quote]

Thanks for your wise and loving counsel, Wayne! I do appreciate it.
Donna
A pastor of the North American Lutheran Church.

Marshall Hahn

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Re: Looming Shortage of Pastors - Worse Than We Realized?
« Reply #166 on: July 03, 2019, 08:22:40 AM »

When I interviewed at a congregation, the Call Committee said that the previous pastor took care of the lawn. I told them that he's not going to do it anymore. They'll have to find someone else. They did. (I don't even take care of my own lawn.)

Back in my UMC days, I moved into a parsonage with a large lawn. I was utterly astonished to learn that the previous pastor had convinced the congregation to pay his teenage sons (he had three of them) to mow the lawn. Great way to send a message about viewing the house as the personal space of the pastor and family. And great way to teach your teenagers about responsibility for taking care of your living space.
That is what I did when I moved to my present call.  I asked the church to purchase a riding mower (it will stay here when we move) and to pay our kids to mow the lawn.  Now that they are gone I mow it and they pay me.  There is about an acre to mow.  It takes 1 to 2 hours to mow it, depending on how well I trim it, and I find it a nice break from my pastoral duties, as well as making the parsonage life feel more like "home". 

The parsonage sits on about 3 acres altogether - which was originally for the pastor's horse and cow.  For years one of the farmers made hay on the other 2 acres, then we had it in the CRP - it qualified because the well for the town's water supply is adjacent to our property.  A few years ago we planted trees on a little over an acre of the land.  One of our members who is a Master Woodsman and I managed it at first.  Now about all we do is let them grow.  The other 1/2 acre or so is an open field into which I have been trying to introduce prairie flowers and plants.  I have enjoyed taking care of the property and have always felt you feel a greater attachment to a place when you put some sweat into it.

Marshall Hahn

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Re: Looming Shortage of Pastors - Worse Than We Realized?
« Reply #167 on: July 03, 2019, 09:05:44 AM »
Pastor Hahn writes:
I asked the church to purchase a riding mower (it will stay here when we move) and to pay our kids to mow the lawn.  Now that they are gone I mow it and they pay me.  There is about an acre to mow.  It takes 1 to 2 hours to mow it, depending on how well I trim it, and I find it a nice break from my pastoral duties, as well as making the parsonage life feel more like "home". 

I muse:
“...feel more like home....” ?
Well, when I had a home, nobody paid me to mow my own lawn. And I suppose it does feel good to take “a nice break” from pastoral duties and get paid for it. Congratulations on your good negotiating skills.
And I assume you are getting home equity in your compensation package as well. Good.
Retired ELCA Pastor. Iowa native. Now in Minneapolis. One must always ponder both the value and the dangers of poking the bear. Aroused and stimulated, the bear usually shows its true self. Or it might leap to an extreme version of itself. You never know with bears.

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Re: Looming Shortage of Pastors - Worse Than We Realized?
« Reply #168 on: July 03, 2019, 03:40:54 PM »
"An acre to mow" is a rather different situation than a suburban home with a back yard.
The Rev. Richard O. Johnson, STS

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Re: Looming Shortage of Pastors - Worse Than We Realized?
« Reply #169 on: July 03, 2019, 09:57:27 PM »
Pastor Hahn writes:
I asked the church to purchase a riding mower (it will stay here when we move) and to pay our kids to mow the lawn.  Now that they are gone I mow it and they pay me.  There is about an acre to mow.  It takes 1 to 2 hours to mow it, depending on how well I trim it, and I find it a nice break from my pastoral duties, as well as making the parsonage life feel more like "home". 

I muse:
“...feel more like home....” ?
Well, when I had a home, nobody paid me to mow my own lawn. And I suppose it does feel good to take “a nice break” from pastoral duties and get paid for it. Congratulations on your good negotiating skills.
And I assume you are getting home equity in your compensation package as well. Good.

Muse away.  You pet the cat.  I mow the lawn.  And remember it is not my lawn.  But taking care of it makes it seem more like "home" than a "rental" property.  I actually did the same thing when I was renting before going to seminary.  I took care of the grounds of the apartment building where we lived.  I got a break on the rent and I also felt a greater "ownership" at that time, too.  And as far as your "assumptions" the parish was paying quite a bit more for someone else to mow the lawn before I came.  The negotiations were somewhat along the lines of, "We can mow the lawn."  "Great!  We'll pay you."  "That's not necessary."  "We insist."  "Well, just pay our kids -they'll do the mowing." 

Donald Trump I am not.

Marshall Hahn

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Re: Looming Shortage of Pastors - Worse Than We Realized?
« Reply #170 on: July 03, 2019, 10:13:50 PM »
"An acre to mow" is a rather different situation than a suburban home with a back yard.


The suburban home I grew up in had 1/2 acre in the backyard. My ex-farmer father mowed it.
"The church … had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

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Re: Looming Shortage of Pastors - Worse Than We Realized?
« Reply #171 on: July 07, 2019, 12:29:23 PM »
Funny how this thread has gone from looming shortage of Pastors to “How we are doing in retirement”.  That being the case, I will reply as one retired for about 2 years now.

Some observations:  1.  I was “done” with the congregation I was serving.  I positioned the congregation in a different direction and was instrumental in Calling my successor who is now taking the congregation in that direction and doing a wonderful job in a very challenging ministry situation.  2.  Being an Emeritus Pastor in the LCMS is the best position I have found for serving the Church-AT-Large.  I am teaching Deacons on behalf of our District.  I donate my honorarium to help my students offset the tuition of the program.  3.  I am learning how to sit in a pew with my wife and worship.  Still a little difficult but getting better. In our congregation I have come along side my Pastor to support him and his ministry.  I work out with him twice a week (we both hate exercise) and am open to listening and caring for him as he needs.  I support his ministry at every opportunity personally and publicly.  At his request, I do all of the premarital preparation and provide aspect os pastoral care that I have training and charism to do.  4. The first year after retirement I preached all but 2 weekends....too much.  I have tried to limit my outside preaching (I occasionally preach at our congregation) to one weekend a month at most, in spite of more opportunities and invitations.  I kind it to being in the Reserves of the military....however in this current month of July 2019, I am preaching 3 out of 4 weekends away from our parish.  My wife stays home, as she is on the Church Council of our congregation.

I confess that the struggle for me has been my transition from “Liturgy with a Smile” to preaching/presiding in street clothes.  The music isn’t a problem for me as our contemporary music team is amazing and pretty darn Lutheran.  I will get my “vestment” fix the next 2 of 3 weekends preaching this month.

Because of my chronic pain, it is better that I did retire at 65, probably should have done it sooner.  I am now much less stressed out and my pain is actually better thanks to an implanted spinal cord stimulator and a very low opiate dose to get to the bone pain.  After presiding and preaching two Sunday Divine Services leaves me exhausted and in quite a bit of pain...but it is worth it!

FYI, a couple of my Deacon students are now SMP serving in the same small churches they served for years as a Deacon.  I have also seen the SMP as a way to home grow some Pastors....I’m OK with that, but anticipate the time with the CCM will rule that we have traditionally had “one Office” of the Pastor, now with two humanly created rosters that should be merged making all Pastors equal....I’m not saying I agree, but that is my prediction.  Should be interesting.
The Old Padre Dave Poedel, now retired, coming back to catch up with friends, old and new

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Re: Looming Shortage of Pastors - Worse Than We Realized?
« Reply #172 on: July 07, 2019, 01:26:16 PM »
Funny how this thread has gone from looming shortage of Pastors to “How we are doing in retirement”.  That being the case, I will reply as one retired for about 2 years now.

Some observations:  1.  I was “done” with the congregation I was serving.  I positioned the congregation in a different direction and was instrumental in Calling my successor who is now taking the congregation in that direction and doing a wonderful job in a very challenging ministry situation.  2.  Being an Emeritus Pastor in the LCMS is the best position I have found for serving the Church-AT-Large.  I am teaching Deacons on behalf of our District.  I donate my honorarium to help my students offset the tuition of the program.  3.  I am learning how to sit in a pew with my wife and worship.  Still a little difficult but getting better. In our congregation I have come along side my Pastor to support him and his ministry.  I work out with him twice a week (we both hate exercise) and am open to listening and caring for him as he needs.  I support his ministry at every opportunity personally and publicly.  At his request, I do all of the premarital preparation and provide aspect os pastoral care that I have training and charism to do.  4. The first year after retirement I preached all but 2 weekends....too much.  I have tried to limit my outside preaching (I occasionally preach at our congregation) to one weekend a month at most, in spite of more opportunities and invitations.  I kind it to being in the Reserves of the military....however in this current month of July 2019, I am preaching 3 out of 4 weekends away from our parish.  My wife stays home, as she is on the Church Council of our congregation.

I confess that the struggle for me has been my transition from “Liturgy with a Smile” to preaching/presiding in street clothes.  The music isn’t a problem for me as our contemporary music team is amazing and pretty darn Lutheran.  I will get my “vestment” fix the next 2 of 3 weekends preaching this month.

Because of my chronic pain, it is better that I did retire at 65, probably should have done it sooner.  I am now much less stressed out and my pain is actually better thanks to an implanted spinal cord stimulator and a very low opiate dose to get to the bone pain.  After presiding and preaching two Sunday Divine Services leaves me exhausted and in quite a bit of pain...but it is worth it!

FYI, a couple of my Deacon students are now SMP serving in the same small churches they served for years as a Deacon.  I have also seen the SMP as a way to home grow some Pastors....I’m OK with that, but anticipate the time with the CCM will rule that we have traditionally had “one Office” of the Pastor, now with two humanly created rosters that should be merged making all Pastors equal....I’m not saying I agree, but that is my prediction.  Should be interesting.

Padre,

I was always taught (and hold to the teaching) that a retiring pastor ought NOT have a role (let alone being "instrumental") in selecting/calling his successor.  Especially if he is to remain in the congregation.  Curious as to why you did otherwise.

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Re: Looming Shortage of Pastors - Worse Than We Realized?
« Reply #173 on: July 07, 2019, 02:07:34 PM »
Funny how this thread has gone from looming shortage of Pastors to “How we are doing in retirement”.  That being the case, I will reply as one retired for about 2 years now.

Some observations:  1.  I was “done” with the congregation I was serving.  I positioned the congregation in a different direction and was instrumental in Calling my successor who is now taking the congregation in that direction and doing a wonderful job in a very challenging ministry situation.  2.  Being an Emeritus Pastor in the LCMS is the best position I have found for serving the Church-AT-Large.  I am teaching Deacons on behalf of our District.  I donate my honorarium to help my students offset the tuition of the program.  3.  I am learning how to sit in a pew with my wife and worship.  Still a little difficult but getting better. In our congregation I have come along side my Pastor to support him and his ministry.  I work out with him twice a week (we both hate exercise) and am open to listening and caring for him as he needs.  I support his ministry at every opportunity personally and publicly.  At his request, I do all of the premarital preparation and provide aspect os pastoral care that I have training and charism to do.  4. The first year after retirement I preached all but 2 weekends....too much.  I have tried to limit my outside preaching (I occasionally preach at our congregation) to one weekend a month at most, in spite of more opportunities and invitations.  I kind it to being in the Reserves of the military....however in this current month of July 2019, I am preaching 3 out of 4 weekends away from our parish.  My wife stays home, as she is on the Church Council of our congregation.

I confess that the struggle for me has been my transition from “Liturgy with a Smile” to preaching/presiding in street clothes.  The music isn’t a problem for me as our contemporary music team is amazing and pretty darn Lutheran.  I will get my “vestment” fix the next 2 of 3 weekends preaching this month.

Because of my chronic pain, it is better that I did retire at 65, probably should have done it sooner.  I am now much less stressed out and my pain is actually better thanks to an implanted spinal cord stimulator and a very low opiate dose to get to the bone pain.  After presiding and preaching two Sunday Divine Services leaves me exhausted and in quite a bit of pain...but it is worth it!

FYI, a couple of my Deacon students are now SMP serving in the same small churches they served for years as a Deacon.  I have also seen the SMP as a way to home grow some Pastors....I’m OK with that, but anticipate the time with the CCM will rule that we have traditionally had “one Office” of the Pastor, now with two humanly created rosters that should be merged making all Pastors equal....I’m not saying I agree, but that is my prediction.  Should be interesting.

Padre,

I was always taught (and hold to the teaching) that a retiring pastor ought NOT have a role (let alone being "instrumental") in selecting/calling his successor.  Especially if he is to remain in the congregation.  Curious as to why you did otherwise.

I think I was taught the same as you, but I have never quite understood why.  Why shouldn't a retiring pastor help the congregation choose a pastor to replace him?  I'm not saying that I want to do this when I retire.  But if I did, what would be wrong with it? 

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Re: Looming Shortage of Pastors - Worse Than We Realized?
« Reply #174 on: July 07, 2019, 04:21:11 PM »
In my last interim before my final retirement, I encouraged a seminarian who would be ready for a call in a few months to seek this particular call.  He had preached there, knew the territory, and wished to live in the northern New Jersey or New York area. Then I dropped the word with a couple of key members of the call committee that he was interested.
After that, everything went according to the prescribed way of doing things, through the bishop and the Synod and the candidacy committee. He got the call.
Retired ELCA Pastor. Iowa native. Now in Minneapolis. One must always ponder both the value and the dangers of poking the bear. Aroused and stimulated, the bear usually shows its true self. Or it might leap to an extreme version of itself. You never know with bears.

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Re: Looming Shortage of Pastors - Worse Than We Realized?
« Reply #175 on: July 07, 2019, 04:47:57 PM »
Funny how this thread has gone from looming shortage of Pastors to “How we are doing in retirement”.  That being the case, I will reply as one retired for about 2 years now.

Some observations:  1.  I was “done” with the congregation I was serving.  I positioned the congregation in a different direction and was instrumental in Calling my successor who is now taking the congregation in that direction and doing a wonderful job in a very challenging ministry situation.  2.  Being an Emeritus Pastor in the LCMS is the best position I have found for serving the Church-AT-Large.  I am teaching Deacons on behalf of our District.  I donate my honorarium to help my students offset the tuition of the program.  3.  I am learning how to sit in a pew with my wife and worship.  Still a little difficult but getting better. In our congregation I have come along side my Pastor to support him and his ministry.  I work out with him twice a week (we both hate exercise) and am open to listening and caring for him as he needs.  I support his ministry at every opportunity personally and publicly.  At his request, I do all of the premarital preparation and provide aspect os pastoral care that I have training and charism to do.  4. The first year after retirement I preached all but 2 weekends....too much.  I have tried to limit my outside preaching (I occasionally preach at our congregation) to one weekend a month at most, in spite of more opportunities and invitations.  I kind it to being in the Reserves of the military....however in this current month of July 2019, I am preaching 3 out of 4 weekends away from our parish.  My wife stays home, as she is on the Church Council of our congregation.

I confess that the struggle for me has been my transition from “Liturgy with a Smile” to preaching/presiding in street clothes.  The music isn’t a problem for me as our contemporary music team is amazing and pretty darn Lutheran.  I will get my “vestment” fix the next 2 of 3 weekends preaching this month.

Because of my chronic pain, it is better that I did retire at 65, probably should have done it sooner.  I am now much less stressed out and my pain is actually better thanks to an implanted spinal cord stimulator and a very low opiate dose to get to the bone pain.  After presiding and preaching two Sunday Divine Services leaves me exhausted and in quite a bit of pain...but it is worth it!

FYI, a couple of my Deacon students are now SMP serving in the same small churches they served for years as a Deacon.  I have also seen the SMP as a way to home grow some Pastors....I’m OK with that, but anticipate the time with the CCM will rule that we have traditionally had “one Office” of the Pastor, now with two humanly created rosters that should be merged making all Pastors equal....I’m not saying I agree, but that is my prediction.  Should be interesting.

Padre,

I was always taught (and hold to the teaching) that a retiring pastor ought NOT have a role (let alone being "instrumental") in selecting/calling his successor.  Especially if he is to remain in the congregation.  Curious as to why you did otherwise.

I think I was taught the same as you, but I have never quite understood why.  Why shouldn't a retiring pastor help the congregation choose a pastor to replace him?  I'm not saying that I want to do this when I retire.  But if I did, what would be wrong with it?

Here's some possible reasons:

1. Because the retired man is no longer the pastor.  If he remains there (not wise, in my opinion), his voice should count no more than any other members.

2. Because the retired man may be tempted to think the new pastor "owes" his call to his efforts.

3. Because the retired man may be tempted to want someone to continue in his ways, making it harder for the new pastor.

4. Because God calls through the congregation, not the clergy.

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Re: Looming Shortage of Pastors - Worse Than We Realized?
« Reply #176 on: July 07, 2019, 06:22:20 PM »
Funny how this thread has gone from looming shortage of Pastors to “How we are doing in retirement”.  That being the case, I will reply as one retired for about 2 years now.

Some observations:  1.  I was “done” with the congregation I was serving.  I positioned the congregation in a different direction and was instrumental in Calling my successor who is now taking the congregation in that direction and doing a wonderful job in a very challenging ministry situation.  2.  Being an Emeritus Pastor in the LCMS is the best position I have found for serving the Church-AT-Large.  I am teaching Deacons on behalf of our District.  I donate my honorarium to help my students offset the tuition of the program.  3.  I am learning how to sit in a pew with my wife and worship.  Still a little difficult but getting better. In our congregation I have come along side my Pastor to support him and his ministry.  I work out with him twice a week (we both hate exercise) and am open to listening and caring for him as he needs.  I support his ministry at every opportunity personally and publicly.  At his request, I do all of the premarital preparation and provide aspect os pastoral care that I have training and charism to do.  4. The first year after retirement I preached all but 2 weekends....too much.  I have tried to limit my outside preaching (I occasionally preach at our congregation) to one weekend a month at most, in spite of more opportunities and invitations.  I kind it to being in the Reserves of the military....however in this current month of July 2019, I am preaching 3 out of 4 weekends away from our parish.  My wife stays home, as she is on the Church Council of our congregation.

I confess that the struggle for me has been my transition from “Liturgy with a Smile” to preaching/presiding in street clothes.  The music isn’t a problem for me as our contemporary music team is amazing and pretty darn Lutheran.  I will get my “vestment” fix the next 2 of 3 weekends preaching this month.

Because of my chronic pain, it is better that I did retire at 65, probably should have done it sooner.  I am now much less stressed out and my pain is actually better thanks to an implanted spinal cord stimulator and a very low opiate dose to get to the bone pain.  After presiding and preaching two Sunday Divine Services leaves me exhausted and in quite a bit of pain...but it is worth it!

FYI, a couple of my Deacon students are now SMP serving in the same small churches they served for years as a Deacon.  I have also seen the SMP as a way to home grow some Pastors....I’m OK with that, but anticipate the time with the CCM will rule that we have traditionally had “one Office” of the Pastor, now with two humanly created rosters that should be merged making all Pastors equal....I’m not saying I agree, but that is my prediction.  Should be interesting.

Padre,

I was always taught (and hold to the teaching) that a retiring pastor ought NOT have a role (let alone being "instrumental") in selecting/calling his successor.  Especially if he is to remain in the congregation.  Curious as to why you did otherwise.

I think I was taught the same as you, but I have never quite understood why.  Why shouldn't a retiring pastor help the congregation choose a pastor to replace him?  I'm not saying that I want to do this when I retire.  But if I did, what would be wrong with it?

Here's some possible reasons:

1. Because the retired man is no longer the pastor.  If he remains there (not wise, in my opinion), his voice should count no more than any other members.

2. Because the retired man may be tempted to think the new pastor "owes" his call to his efforts.

3. Because the retired man may be tempted to want someone to continue in his ways, making it harder for the new pastor.

4. Because God calls through the congregation, not the clergy.


I would venture to guess that the times a retired pastor was involved in a healthy way that benefited the congregation and new pastor; there are many more times that the old pastor was seen as butting in and caused problems - even if the retired pastor believed he was being helpful.
"The church … had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

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Re: Looming Shortage of Pastors - Worse Than We Realized?
« Reply #177 on: July 07, 2019, 08:28:13 PM »
Funny how this thread has gone from looming shortage of Pastors to “How we are doing in retirement”.  That being the case, I will reply as one retired for about 2 years now.

Some observations:  1.  I was “done” with the congregation I was serving.  I positioned the congregation in a different direction and was instrumental in Calling my successor who is now taking the congregation in that direction and doing a wonderful job in a very challenging ministry situation.  2.  Being an Emeritus Pastor in the LCMS is the best position I have found for serving the Church-AT-Large.  I am teaching Deacons on behalf of our District.  I donate my honorarium to help my students offset the tuition of the program.  3.  I am learning how to sit in a pew with my wife and worship.  Still a little difficult but getting better. In our congregation I have come along side my Pastor to support him and his ministry.  I work out with him twice a week (we both hate exercise) and am open to listening and caring for him as he needs.  I support his ministry at every opportunity personally and publicly.  At his request, I do all of the premarital preparation and provide aspect os pastoral care that I have training and charism to do.  4. The first year after retirement I preached all but 2 weekends....too much.  I have tried to limit my outside preaching (I occasionally preach at our congregation) to one weekend a month at most, in spite of more opportunities and invitations.  I kind it to being in the Reserves of the military....however in this current month of July 2019, I am preaching 3 out of 4 weekends away from our parish.  My wife stays home, as she is on the Church Council of our congregation.

I confess that the struggle for me has been my transition from “Liturgy with a Smile” to preaching/presiding in street clothes.  The music isn’t a problem for me as our contemporary music team is amazing and pretty darn Lutheran.  I will get my “vestment” fix the next 2 of 3 weekends preaching this month.

Because of my chronic pain, it is better that I did retire at 65, probably should have done it sooner.  I am now much less stressed out and my pain is actually better thanks to an implanted spinal cord stimulator and a very low opiate dose to get to the bone pain.  After presiding and preaching two Sunday Divine Services leaves me exhausted and in quite a bit of pain...but it is worth it!

FYI, a couple of my Deacon students are now SMP serving in the same small churches they served for years as a Deacon.  I have also seen the SMP as a way to home grow some Pastors....I’m OK with that, but anticipate the time with the CCM will rule that we have traditionally had “one Office” of the Pastor, now with two humanly created rosters that should be merged making all Pastors equal....I’m not saying I agree, but that is my prediction.  Should be interesting.

Padre,

I was always taught (and hold to the teaching) that a retiring pastor ought NOT have a role (let alone being "instrumental") in selecting/calling his successor.  Especially if he is to remain in the congregation.  Curious as to why you did otherwise.

I think I was taught the same as you, but I have never quite understood why.  Why shouldn't a retiring pastor help the congregation choose a pastor to replace him?  I'm not saying that I want to do this when I retire.  But if I did, what would be wrong with it?

Here's some possible reasons:

1. Because the retired man is no longer the pastor.  If he remains there (not wise, in my opinion), his voice should count no more than any other members.

2. Because the retired man may be tempted to think the new pastor "owes" his call to his efforts.

3. Because the retired man may be tempted to want someone to continue in his ways, making it harder for the new pastor.

4. Because God calls through the congregation, not the clergy.

5.  To remove the temptation for members of the congregation to run to the retiree if the new pastor does something they don't like.

I'm not a pastor, just a PK.  But when my father retired 20+ years ago, #5 was the primary reason my parents transferred to a different congregation after his retirement.  My father was serving as circuit counselor (that was still the title in 1998) when he retired.   So as to avoid a variation on #2, he asked another retiree in the circuit, who had previously served as counselor, to work with the congregation during the call process.

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Re: Looming Shortage of Pastors - Worse Than We Realized?
« Reply #178 on: July 08, 2019, 02:37:07 PM »
It seems to me that since most participants in here are far more concerned with the mechanics and protocols of replacing one pastor with another upon retirement, and usually assume the worst case scenario as reason to outlaw any practice that can be beneficial if done properly, the "Looming Shortage of Pastors" isn't something to worry about. By the time all the current crop of old Pastors are dead, and there are not enough newly minted young ones to replace them, the dead Pastors won't have to worry about it. The shortage of Pastors will be someone else's problem.

Fortunately, I'm also old, so I'll also be dead before the situation is a problem. My granddaughters will just have to go to some non-denominational mega church when they're adults.

Dan Fienen

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Re: Looming Shortage of Pastors - Worse Than We Realized?
« Reply #179 on: July 08, 2019, 02:55:00 PM »
I can't say that I've ever experienced the problems of having a retired pastor hanging around and interfering, but I've heard of that happening. There are plenty of potential pitfalls as well as potential benefits all around. When I retired from my previous parish I lived a couple of blocks from the church for a couple of years, attended on Sundays when I wasn't supply preaching and attended a midweek men's Bible Study (at the invitation of the new pastor) and even subbed for him on occasion at the Bible Study. I on principle did not comment on my successor and responded neutrally to any comments made to me and referred them to the pastor or elders. I don't remember be asked to perform funerals, weddings, etc. nor would I have.



What helped was that I immediately after retirement served a six month vacancy which kept me out of church services at my previous church and did a goodly amount of supply preaching thereafter. I just wasn't around that much. Then I received a call to a part time pastorate and moved out of the area.


What is essential is maintaining good boundaries. I was no longer pastor there and would not trespass onto another pastor's responsibility.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2019, 02:56:47 PM by Dan Fienen »
Pr. Daniel Fienen
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