Author Topic: A Christmas Message from the NALC  (Read 2383 times)

Eileen Smith

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Re: A Christmas Message from the NALC
« Reply #30 on: December 30, 2017, 01:48:42 PM »
I'm wondering if one needs to look at intended audience.  From Bishop Bradosky's salutation, my understanding is that he is writing to the ministerium and laity of the NALC.  Bishop Eaton, I believe, is writing beyond that audience to those not in the pews of the ELCA, not in any pew at all -- yet, of course, including the ELCA.

As one who active in the church I found great depth and much to think about in the NALC greeting.  Yet, so often I found myself in the situation Bishop Eaton describes and I thought it an excellent piece on Advent and its significance.

I'm quite certain that Bishop Eaton's feet are planted as firmly as Bishop Bradosky's are and Jesus certainly was proclaimed in both messages. 

At the risk of ending on a less than positive note, I would agree with many here that there are a number of issues that might cause one grief in the ELCA, but sometimes I think we look for what might not even exist.  My intent on starting this thread was to share what I thought was a beautiful reflection, not to compare it to the ELCA, LCMS or any other Lutheran body and have that body come up short.

gan ainm

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Re: A Christmas Message from the NALC
« Reply #31 on: December 30, 2017, 02:32:29 PM »
I'm wondering if one needs to look at intended audience.  From Bishop Bradosky's salutation, my understanding is that he is writing to the ministerium and laity of the NALC.  Bishop Eaton, I believe, is writing beyond that audience to those not in the pews of the ELCA, not in any pew at all -- yet, of course, including the ELCA.

As one who active in the church I found great depth and much to think about in the NALC greeting.  Yet, so often I found myself in the situation Bishop Eaton describes and I thought it an excellent piece on Advent and its significance.

I'm quite certain that Bishop Eaton's feet are planted as firmly as Bishop Bradosky's are and Jesus certainly was proclaimed in both messages. 

At the risk of ending on a less than positive note, I would agree with many here that there are a number of issues that might cause one grief in the ELCA, but sometimes I think we look for what might not even exist.  My intent on starting this thread was to share what I thought was a beautiful reflection, not to compare it to the ELCA, LCMS or any other Lutheran body and have that body come up short.

Eileen, as always, you reflect God's grace.  Happy New Year to you and yours. 


readselerttoo

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Re: A Christmas Message from the NALC
« Reply #32 on: December 30, 2017, 03:49:48 PM »
St. Paul reflects upon life in Christ by way of what had happened to him in Christ's encounter with him on the Damascus Rd,:   "I have been crucified with Christ.  It is no longer I who live but it is Christ who lives in me.  That which I now live in the flesh I live in faith of the Son of God (ie. Christ Jesus)..."

This should be more than enough proof that our ground is no longer within ourselves nor within our experiences.  Our basis of intent is in the faith of the Son of God and then going forward in that...

Bp. Eaton while perhaps  trying to tie a common thread with others, loses me (as one of those "others") because I need to hear "her story" first before God's story.  That approach seems to mix up priorities.  St. Paul in Athens had been talking about Jesus and the Resurrection (not a second deity!) to those in the marketplace.  He seems to not care whether they might know about "his story" as much as it seems more urgent to talk about the One who is beyond death and who is present now (really and actually present now!) in His Word (not in St. Paul's).  The urgency and preponderance which the Gospel contains has us ditching our story for the story of the One who calls each one into a loving and forgiving and saving relationship now and then moving forward.  Calls to repentance seem to issue from someone who no longer is interested in their own personal story or their own intention.  "Come to me all who are weary and heavily laden and I will give you rest" is Jesus' word to those who no longer have hope in their own because they have discovered true and thorough peace in That Other who is alive and wants no more for anything else but to serve them with His Hope through His Narrative.

I understand that Bp. Eaton is concerned for others as well.  But the ground that needs to be laid no longer resides in us/her or in "Our Story"  in general, but in the One who is for us and not against us.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2017, 03:53:49 PM by George Rahn »

Pastor Ken Kimball

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Re: A Christmas Message from the NALC
« Reply #33 on: December 30, 2017, 03:51:43 PM »
I'm wondering if one needs to look at intended audience.  From Bishop Bradosky's salutation, my understanding is that he is writing to the ministerium and laity of the NALC.  Bishop Eaton, I believe, is writing beyond that audience to those not in the pews of the ELCA, not in any pew at all -- yet, of course, including the ELCA.

As one who active in the church I found great depth and much to think about in the NALC greeting.  Yet, so often I found myself in the situation Bishop Eaton describes and I thought it an excellent piece on Advent and its significance.

I'm quite certain that Bishop Eaton's feet are planted as firmly as Bishop Bradosky's are and Jesus certainly was proclaimed in both messages. 

At the risk of ending on a less than positive note, I would agree with many here that there are a number of issues that might cause one grief in the ELCA, but sometimes I think we look for what might not even exist.  My intent on starting this thread was to share what I thought was a beautiful reflection, not to compare it to the ELCA, LCMS or any other Lutheran body and have that body come up short.
Thanks Eileen.  As an NALC pastor, I am grateful for John's gifts as our bishop, including his ability to reflect and write deeply on the Christian faith.  We are blessed to have him.