Author Topic: R.I.P Justice Scalia  (Read 12711 times)

James_Gale

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Re: R.I.P Justice Scalia
« Reply #240 on: February 24, 2016, 02:55:06 PM »
In New York City, all it takes is registration with the city clergy. Fill out a form, stating your religious affiliation (or lack of it), and you get on the list of approved officiants.


I think that most of the US is moving in this direction, which makes sense to me.  In DC, I had to get formal court approval, which was time-consuming and a little costly.  (I didn't mind the time or expense, given my friendship with the couple being married.  But the burden of getting a court order likely dissuaded many would-be officiants.)  DC has since opened things up so that a court order no longer is needed.

John_Hannah

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Re: R.I.P Justice Scalia
« Reply #241 on: February 24, 2016, 02:58:24 PM »
In New York City, all it takes is registration with the city clergy. Fill out a form, stating your religious affiliation (or lack of it), and you get on the list of approved officiants.

That's changed a lot in 23 years then. I had to take my ordination certificate (from the frame), the LCMS Directory with my name in it, and the Call Document from Trinity, Bronx (one of the 5 boroughs). The only fortuitous feature of that exercise was that the subway from my neighborhood stops right at City Hall.   :(
Pr. JOHN HANNAH, STS

RPG

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Re: R.I.P Justice Scalia
« Reply #242 on: February 24, 2016, 03:02:20 PM »
In New York City, all it takes is registration with the city clergy.

Do they serve as court chaplains to Hizzoner?  ;)
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James_Gale

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Re: R.I.P Justice Scalia
« Reply #243 on: February 24, 2016, 03:07:41 PM »
In New York City, all it takes is registration with the city clergy. Fill out a form, stating your religious affiliation (or lack of it), and you get on the list of approved officiants.

That's changed a lot in 23 years then. I had to take my ordination certificate (from the frame), the LCMS Directory with my name in it, and the Call Document from Trinity, Bronx (one of the 5 boroughs). The only fortuitous feature of that exercise was that the subway from my neighborhood stops right at City Hall.   :(


The Bronx didn't have its own office for handling such things? 


I spent a good deal of time in the federal and state courthouses at that subway stop.

Richard Johnson

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Re: R.I.P Justice Scalia
« Reply #244 on: February 24, 2016, 03:24:28 PM »
In California, it doesn't even take that. Just fill in the box that says "If a religious official, denomination."
The Rev. Richard O. Johnson, STS

John_Hannah

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Re: R.I.P Justice Scalia
« Reply #245 on: February 24, 2016, 03:45:48 PM »
In New York City, all it takes is registration with the city clergy. Fill out a form, stating your religious affiliation (or lack of it), and you get on the list of approved officiants.

That's changed a lot in 23 years then. I had to take my ordination certificate (from the frame), the LCMS Directory with my name in it, and the Call Document from Trinity, Bronx (one of the 5 boroughs). The only fortuitous feature of that exercise was that the subway from my neighborhood stops right at City Hall.   :(

The Bronx didn't have its own office for handling such things? 


I spent a good deal of time in the federal and state courthouses at that subway stop.

Everyone had to go to City Hall then. When the clerk completed everything, she said, "Now you can marry in all five boroughs." As I rode home on the #6 Train, I wondered how they could possibly check every license to insure the officiant was properly registered. With such a high level of immigration to the city from all states in the U.S., I imagine that someone's uncle has come from Kansas to conduct a wedding without any idea that it's not allowed. I'm equally sure that no one ever knew the difference and the couple lived happily ever after.

Peace, JOHN
« Last Edit: February 24, 2016, 03:47:32 PM by John_Hannah »
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Matt Staneck

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Re: R.I.P Justice Scalia
« Reply #246 on: February 24, 2016, 04:02:53 PM »
In New York City, all it takes is registration with the city clergy. Fill out a form, stating your religious affiliation (or lack of it), and you get on the list of approved officiants.

That's changed a lot in 23 years then. I had to take my ordination certificate (from the frame), the LCMS Directory with my name in it, and the Call Document from Trinity, Bronx (one of the 5 boroughs). The only fortuitous feature of that exercise was that the subway from my neighborhood stops right at City Hall.   :(

This is actually still the practice. I think Pr. Austin presented a much abbreviated version of what you laid out.

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Donald_Kirchner

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Re: R.I.P Justice Scalia
« Reply #247 on: February 27, 2016, 12:46:17 PM »
Now that we've gotten over the euphoria generated from Jesus of Nazareth actually being mentioned in a national forum, one view:

http://ihoppe.com/blog/?p=4656

Rolf Preus has posted online:

"Mr. [Robert] Baker, I asked you to show me where in the sermon under discussion the preacher said what you said he said when you wrote:

'Let's rather focus on the clear fact that thousands, perhaps tens of thousands of persons, not to mention a few Jewish members of our nation's highest court, heard about Jesus Christ and Him crucified for the forgiveness of sins.'

I asked you 'where the preacher preached Jesus Christ and him crucified for the forgiveness of sins.'...You havenít answered yet.

Thatís okay. Donít bother. He didnít. The preacher didnít say what you said he said..."
« Last Edit: February 27, 2016, 02:56:27 PM by Pr. Don Kirchner »
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Dave Benke

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Re: R.I.P Justice Scalia
« Reply #248 on: February 27, 2016, 02:24:38 PM »
In New York City, all it takes is registration with the city clergy. Fill out a form, stating your religious affiliation (or lack of it), and you get on the list of approved officiants.

That's changed a lot in 23 years then. I had to take my ordination certificate (from the frame), the LCMS Directory with my name in it, and the Call Document from Trinity, Bronx (one of the 5 boroughs). The only fortuitous feature of that exercise was that the subway from my neighborhood stops right at City Hall.   :(

This is actually still the practice. I think Pr. Austin presented a much abbreviated version of what you laid out.

M. Staneck

Yes - I thought this might be nationwide until a particular experience in Las Vegas, where a parish family decided on a "destination" wedding.  AFter many delays I finally acquired a One Day Certification in Nevada, just for the day of the wedding.  That seemed weird enough.   However, since the wedding was at an area outdoors from one of the hotel/casinos, we discovered there were separate contractual rules.  So I brought the message, but the opening songs and the vows themselves were conducted by one of the casino ministers and.....an Elvis impersonator.  Thank you very much.

Dave Benke

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Re: R.I.P Justice Scalia
« Reply #249 on: February 27, 2016, 04:39:46 PM »
In New York City, all it takes is registration with the city clergy. Fill out a form, stating your religious affiliation (or lack of it), and you get on the list of approved officiants.

That's changed a lot in 23 years then. I had to take my ordination certificate (from the frame), the LCMS Directory with my name in it, and the Call Document from Trinity, Bronx (one of the 5 boroughs). The only fortuitous feature of that exercise was that the subway from my neighborhood stops right at City Hall.   :(

This is actually still the practice. I think Pr. Austin presented a much abbreviated version of what you laid out.

M. Staneck

Yes - I thought this might be nationwide until a particular experience in Las Vegas, where a parish family decided on a "destination" wedding.  AFter many delays I finally acquired a One Day Certification in Nevada, just for the day of the wedding.  That seemed weird enough.   However, since the wedding was at an area outdoors from one of the hotel/casinos, we discovered there were separate contractual rules.  So I brought the message, but the opening songs and the vows themselves were conducted by one of the casino ministers and.....an Elvis impersonator.  Thank you very much.

Dave Benke

Uh-oh, conducting joint worship services again!  Will you ever learn?

LutherMan

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Re: R.I.P Justice Scalia
« Reply #250 on: February 27, 2016, 04:53:03 PM »
In New York City, all it takes is registration with the city clergy. Fill out a form, stating your religious affiliation (or lack of it), and you get on the list of approved officiants.

That's changed a lot in 23 years then. I had to take my ordination certificate (from the frame), the LCMS Directory with my name in it, and the Call Document from Trinity, Bronx (one of the 5 boroughs). The only fortuitous feature of that exercise was that the subway from my neighborhood stops right at City Hall.   :(

This is actually still the practice. I think Pr. Austin presented a much abbreviated version of what you laid out.

M. Staneck

Yes - I thought this might be nationwide until a particular experience in Las Vegas, where a parish family decided on a "destination" wedding.  AFter many delays I finally acquired a One Day Certification in Nevada, just for the day of the wedding.  That seemed weird enough.   However, since the wedding was at an area outdoors from one of the hotel/casinos, we discovered there were separate contractual rules.  So I brought the message, but the opening songs and the vows themselves were conducted by one of the casino ministers and.....an Elvis impersonator.  Thank you very much.

Dave Benke

Uh-oh, conducting joint worship services again!  Will you ever learn?
LOLZ!

Brian Stoffregen

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Re: R.I.P Justice Scalia
« Reply #251 on: February 27, 2016, 05:21:35 PM »
In New York City, all it takes is registration with the city clergy. Fill out a form, stating your religious affiliation (or lack of it), and you get on the list of approved officiants.

That's changed a lot in 23 years then. I had to take my ordination certificate (from the frame), the LCMS Directory with my name in it, and the Call Document from Trinity, Bronx (one of the 5 boroughs). The only fortuitous feature of that exercise was that the subway from my neighborhood stops right at City Hall.   :(

This is actually still the practice. I think Pr. Austin presented a much abbreviated version of what you laid out.

M. Staneck

Yes - I thought this might be nationwide until a particular experience in Las Vegas, where a parish family decided on a "destination" wedding.  AFter many delays I finally acquired a One Day Certification in Nevada, just for the day of the wedding.  That seemed weird enough.   However, since the wedding was at an area outdoors from one of the hotel/casinos, we discovered there were separate contractual rules.  So I brought the message, but the opening songs and the vows themselves were conducted by one of the casino ministers and.....an Elvis impersonator.  Thank you very much.

Dave Benke

Uh-oh, conducting joint worship services again!  Will you ever learn?
LOLZ!


I'm not sure that I would call an Elvis outfit a liturgical vestment. Thus, "worship service" might be a stretch for what it was. :)
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Dave Benke

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Re: R.I.P Justice Scalia
« Reply #252 on: February 27, 2016, 09:52:02 PM »
In New York City, all it takes is registration with the city clergy. Fill out a form, stating your religious affiliation (or lack of it), and you get on the list of approved officiants.

That's changed a lot in 23 years then. I had to take my ordination certificate (from the frame), the LCMS Directory with my name in it, and the Call Document from Trinity, Bronx (one of the 5 boroughs). The only fortuitous feature of that exercise was that the subway from my neighborhood stops right at City Hall.   :(

This is actually still the practice. I think Pr. Austin presented a much abbreviated version of what you laid out.

M. Staneck

Yes - I thought this might be nationwide until a particular experience in Las Vegas, where a parish family decided on a "destination" wedding.  AFter many delays I finally acquired a One Day Certification in Nevada, just for the day of the wedding.  That seemed weird enough.   However, since the wedding was at an area outdoors from one of the hotel/casinos, we discovered there were separate contractual rules.  So I brought the message, but the opening songs and the vows themselves were conducted by one of the casino ministers and.....an Elvis impersonator.  Thank you very much.

Dave Benke

Uh-oh, conducting joint worship services again!  Will you ever learn?

If someone would have offered me a joint as "Elvis" sang "Love Me Tender," I don't think I would have refused.  It would have been a service to me.

Dave Benke