Author Topic: Open Letter to Bp. Hanson  (Read 4098 times)

Richard Johnson

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Open Letter to Bp. Hanson
« on: July 14, 2007, 03:46:17 PM »
The following is making its way around:

An Open Letter to Presiding Bishop, Mark Hanson

Dear Mark,

All my life I have been proud to call myself a Lutheran. Given  my Hussite roots, I have quipped that I was a Lutheran a hundred  years before Luther. That pride is not what it was, as I feel it  breaking down before feelings of betrayal and alienation. This is  happening as I watch my church, like a juggernaut follow the path of  the ECUSA in the matters of the ordination of those openly living in  homosexual relationships and the blessing and marrying of those in such relationships.

We ignore what this is doing to the ECUSA: it faces schism; it  has become a pariah in Africa; the welcome mats from Rome and  Constantinople have been pulled back; membership and income losses  were recently described in "The Christian Century" as "precipitous."  But undeterred, we push forward, apparently ready to accept the same sort of results.

Why? Is it because some new exegetical revelation has burst upon  us? No. All attermpts to claim that come up against the wall that every reference to homosexual practice in our scripture gives a clear negative judgment. Yet we would pronounce it blessed.

So next we launch into a study on the authority of Scripture,  which, excuse me, early signs are, that it will tell us that  we can continue to claim that Scripture is the "source and norm of  our faith and life", as we clearly brush aside Scripture and turn to other sources and norms. We are prepoaring to sell our birthright as the foremost biblical theologians of the West for the pottage of this culture's approval, as we accommodate to its desires and demands in its extraordinary and overwhelming obsession with and worship of sex. What hubris possesses this generation to think it is qualified to rewrite the teaching of what has been the faith for two thousand years, and a thousand before that.

If we succeed in doing this, we will sacrifice the credibility of all our teaching. The very thing that has made our teaching notable has been its solid rootage in Scripture. Make that optional, take it away and who cares what we say about anything?

I read with deep appreciation the paper on the authority of Scripture produced by bishop Paull Spring, and Lutheran CORE. I hope thare may still be hope for us.

In Christ,

George Paul Mocko,

Bishop Emeritus, De, Md. Synod, ELCA
The Rev. Richard O. Johnson, STS

navyman

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Re: Open Letter to Bp. Hanson
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2007, 02:05:24 PM »
 ???

I doubt if you will even get a reply from Bishop Hanson on this issue.  As an ELCA Member,  the ELCA has thrown Scripture aside, as well as the Confessions, to run American Lutheranism into a Liberal sesspool, where real Lutheranism has been thrown out for the Liberal and Revisionist view.

Thus we have a Lutheran Church like no other, and will continue so, until we have nothing!   Thank God, we have Pastors and Some Bishops who stand on the Word of God, and don't follow the Higgins Rd. Unscriptureal view.

Maybe some day we will have a Bishop that will turn the ELCA around back to center, however, I'm not holding my breath.  If gay ordination passes in Aug of 2007 or 2009, I'm gone!

I don't put my trust in anything, but Jesus Christ, Scripture, and the Confessional Teaching of Luther.  I have no faith in the Liberal or Revisionist view period.

Don

Don

Vern

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Re: Open Letter to Bp. Hanson
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2007, 03:20:19 PM »
Wow!!!!

I started a thread named "The Bible", I guess I should have looked here first.

God's Peace,

Vern

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Re: Open Letter to Bp. Hanson
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2007, 04:47:18 PM »
navyman writes:
I doubt if you will even get a reply from Bishop Hanson on this issue.  As an ELCA Member,  the ELCA has thrown Scripture aside, as well as the Confessions, to run American Lutheranism into a Liberal sesspool, where real Lutheranism has been thrown out for the Liberal and Revisionist view.

I respond:
Of course I disagree. and I have to ask again. If one believes this way - that American Lutheranism is a ¨liberal cesspool" - then how does one stay a member?

(A quick question from the jungles of Brazil)

Bergs

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Re: Open Letter to Bp. Hanson
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2007, 07:36:36 AM »
Bishop Mocko hits the nail on the head.  One of the questions that I continue to ask is similar to what he eloquently asks, “What hubris possesses this generation to think it is qualified to rewrite the teaching of what has been the faith for two thousand years, and a thousand before that.”  My simple question is always, “What changed?”

The ELCA is charging headlong toward a deep divide.  Many have suggested here and on other blogs that the ELCA ought to allow non-celibate gays and lesbians to become ordained and see what happens.  We can already see what happens just by looking at the other mainline churches like TEC pointed out here by Bishop Mocko.   

So we will go to another CWA where activists (part of an officially recognized ELCA group) have pledged to keep hammering until the ELCA changes it policy. They will accept no other outcome. Truly a positive note is that all the nonsense I used to hear about compromise and middle ground is gone.  For years, the truth tellers have said there is no viable middle ground.   

Thank you Bishop Mocko.  Thank you to all who dare to speak a traditionalist voice. 

Grace & Peace
Brian J. Bergs
Minneapolis, MN 
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Gary Schnitkey

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Re: Open Letter to Bp. Hanson
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2007, 07:55:38 AM »
Of course I disagree. and I have to ask again. If one believes this way - that American Lutheranism is a ¨liberal cesspool" - then how does one stay a member?

(A quick question from the jungles of Brazil)

That is an interesting question.  I suspect many conservatives who are members of congregations in the ELCA value the other virtues of their congregation over the negatives associated with the ELCA bureaucracy.  Those conservative members may have pastors that are fairly orthodox such that they are sheltered from the ELCA.

For these members, it would be interesting to follow them when they come to a point that makes leaving the ELCA easy.  For example, what happens to these members when they move to another area?  Do they stick with an ELCA or do they go to a church with another affiliation.  Also, what happens to their kids would be interesting to know.  Do they stick with the ELCA?

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Re: Open Letter to Bp. Hanson
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2007, 09:47:42 AM »
Gary:

That would, indeed, be an interesting study, though hard to conduct.  There would have to be quick response to "catch" folks.  I routinely get letters from churches in the midwest advising me that one of their members has moved into my area.  I usually can't find these folks, but on one I recently actually located, they had moved to Phoenix 5 years ago.  Their old church must have been cleaning the rolls and before removing someone, gave a last shot.

What concerns me the most (half of my family is ELCA) are those long-time members of congregations that have been safe havens from the ELCA issues.  When their pastor retires, they are often not able to get a new pastor, so they are left at the mercy of the Bishop to send them those available that may do a 2 point, or are retired.  My family members are currently experiencing this and the pastors being sent are of the revisionist type, which causes heartburn (to say the least) to the members.

Maryland Brian

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Re: Open Letter to Bp. Hanson
« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2007, 10:22:05 AM »
When their pastor retires, they are often not able to get a new pastor, so they are left at the mercy of the Bishop to send them those available that may do a 2 point, or are retired.  My family members are currently experiencing this and the pastors being sent are of the revisionist type, which causes heartburn (to say the least) to the members.

  Sort of the downside of "protecting" our members from some of the more egregious silliness going on in our denomination.  Our system, unless a retiring pastor is proactive, has a rather odd way of passing the baton to the next leader - a lottery wherein the congregation really doesn't know what it has until a couple of years together.

Be that as it may, Bishop Mocko is as passionate about this issue in our own synod as he is/was in this letter.  He sees where this is all headed and IMHO, by virtue of his retirement he can say things that others might not be comfortable putting in print and mailing to Chicago.  As others have already chimed in "should" V&E be changed this summer, I think there will be a greater rumbling in the ELCA than moderate advocates think possible.  Much like TEC leaders who thought it would all blow over (and some of us said pretty clearly in 2003 that their actions would eventually lead to their expulsion from the Anglican Communion and schism inside the US), I have a sense that far too many think this one would just blow over for us too.  Bishop Mocko's letter is a voice of sanity amid those delusions.

Maryland Brian

BeornBjornson

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Re: Open Letter to Bp. Hanson
« Reply #8 on: July 16, 2007, 10:39:55 AM »
Bishop Mocko wrote:
Quote
I read with deep appreciation the paper on the authority of Scripture produced by bishop Paull Spring, and Lutheran CORE. I hope thare may still be hope for us.

For those who may be interested: the paper referred to by Bishop Mocko is available in full in the blog on this Forum Blog under "Lutheran CORE Statement on Authority/Inspiration of Scripture."  I have posted further background information there as well. 

Ken Kimball 

Deb_H.

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Re: Open Letter to Bp. Hanson
« Reply #9 on: July 16, 2007, 12:50:06 PM »
I suspect many conservatives who are members of congregations in the ELCA value the other virtues of their congregation over the negatives associated with the ELCA bureaucracy.  Those conservative members may have pastors that are fairly orthodox such that they are sheltered from the ELCA.

For these members, it would be interesting to follow them when they come to a point that makes leaving the ELCA easy.  For example, what happens to these members when they move to another area?  Do they stick with an ELCA or do they go to a church with another affiliation.  Also, what happens to their kids would be interesting to know.  Do they stick with the ELCA?

These are interesting questions, and I think experience from our former ELCA congregation is informative.  This congregation should be described as "conservative" -- they voted against the merger, and have consistently been served by pastors of a more WordAlone bent.  The pastors consistently did their best to keep the congregation uninvolved in church politics beyond the congregation (as one former pastor put it, "to get involved up there is like rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic.") 

So what has happened to the congregation?  Young people who are serious about scripture and the faith are showing up elsewhere.  One young man is now an ordained pastor in the Lutheran Free Church; another is doing Lutheran youth work for Lutheran Youth Encounter; another went to a Montana fundamentalist Bible camp and is now a member of one of the fundamentalist megachurches in the Portland area.  Our own children are busily engaged in family life in congregations that are not actively involved in synodical or churchwide life.  When the bishop attempted to bring in more "correct" pastors during the last pastoral vacancy, the congregation resisted sufficiently that the bishop basically divorced himself from the process to the point where he acquiesced in the call of a person who badly misrepresented himself to the call committee and the congregation.  Faithful people have been fleeing, hiding out at home, or wondering what has happened ever since. 

Couples who have moved out of town due to job changes or whatever, when we hear from them, they are rarely involved in an ELCA congregation.  One couple moved to MT and the Free Methodist church; my brother moved back to the Portland area and has been investigating LCMS congregations (I'm quite sure he would not even consider an ELCA congregation).  Many young folks end up in "Bible believing churches."  Mars Hill in Seattle is full of former Lutherans.

Lou

navyman

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Re: Open Letter to Bp. Hanson
« Reply #10 on: July 16, 2007, 02:26:02 PM »
I respond:
Of course I disagree. and I have to ask again. If one believes this way - that American Lutheranism is a ¨liberal cesspool" - then how does one stay a member?

Easy, I belong to different orgainzation that are fight the Liberal and Revisionist view.  There are some real Confessional Lutheran within the ELCA, Pastors included, not all of us are of the Liberal mnidset or ibn favor of the gay agenda.

Sweveral have written to Hanson, as well as several reformed groups, as well as I, have never rec'd a reply!  Which means he doesn't want to talk about, or he wants all of us to get along together faithfully!

If I were to leave, pray tell, where would I go, to hear a true confessional stance and believes?

Don
« Last Edit: July 16, 2007, 02:28:09 PM by navyman »

Bergs

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Re: Open Letter to Bp. Hanson
« Reply #11 on: July 20, 2007, 08:33:46 PM »
The letter was emailed to me today on the WordAlone email list. 

Now, it's off to Montana for my wife's family reunion. I wonder how many posts there will be when I get back, what's the weekly count lately?

Grace & Peace
Brian J. Bergs
Minneapolis, MN
   
But let me tell Thee that now, today, people are more persuaded than ever that they have perfect freedom, yet they have brought their freedom to us and laid it humbly at our feet. But that has been our doing.
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Charles_Austin

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Re: Open Letter to Bp. Hanson
« Reply #12 on: July 24, 2007, 05:14:20 PM »
Mr. Hanson writes:
If I were to leave, pray tell, where would I go, to hear a true confessional stance and believes?

I comment:
Nowhere. Because the church is a flawed human institution, you will not find a church where everyone agrees on everything (even on matters of some importance). And when you find a clear, unambiguous definition of what a "true confessional stance" is, a statement which is agreeable to the widest range of faithful Lutherans, let me know. Until then, we will trudge along in this institution that, though flawed, is constantly blessed, and in which people are brought to know Christ and serve him.

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Re: Open Letter to Bp. Hanson
« Reply #13 on: July 25, 2007, 11:34:29 PM »
Because the church is a flawed human institution, you will not find a church where everyone agrees on everything (even on matters of some importance).

And when you find a clear, unambiguous definition of what a "true confessional stance" is, a statement which is agreeable to the widest range of faithful Lutherans, let me know.

The alternatives posed above ignore reality,  as eloquently stated by Bishop Mocko: "What hubris possesses this generation to think it is qualified to rewrite the teaching of what has been the faith for two thousand years, and a thousand before that."

The revisionist line is really one of pluriform truths as in "we all need to get along and accept each other's "truth"".     But that is just a temporary smokescreen to lull the traditionalists into tolerating the new hermaneutics of the revisionists.     All one has to do is look over at ECUSA and you can get a vision of what can happen when revisionists really take command;  i.e. it is likely that the revised church will accept only one truth - the revisionist truth.

And instead of suggesting to the traditionalists that they should leave,     it should be up to the revisionists to leave first,  if they insist on rewriting "the teaching of what has been the faith for two thousand years,  and a thousand before that."
« Last Edit: July 26, 2007, 12:07:34 AM by Richard Johnson »
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Re: Open Letter to Bp. Hanson
« Reply #14 on: April 01, 2020, 01:12:45 PM »
This was on an "Orthodox Global Anglican" site: https://virtueonline.org/open-letter-bishop-mark-hanson-carl-braaten


An Open Letter to Bishop Mark Hanson
From Carl E. Braaten


(Editorial note. This article, though written by a Lutheran theologian to the leader of the ELCA, may well have been written by an orthodox Episcopal theologian to ECUSA's Presiding Bishop.)


The Reverend Dr. Mark Hanson Bishop,
Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
8765 West Higgins Road
Chicago, Illinois 60631


Dear Bishop Mark Hanson:


Greetings! I am writing out of a concern I share with others about the theological state of affairs within the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. The situation might be described as one of "brain drain." Theologians who have served Lutheranism for many years in various capacities have recently left the ELCA and have entered the Roman Catholic Church or the Orthodox Church in America. Why?

When Jaroslav Pelikan left the ELCA and became a member of the OCA, I felt it was not terribly surprising. After all, he had been reading and writing about the Fathers of Eastern Orthodoxy for so many years, he could quite naturally find himself at home in that tradition, without much explanation.


A short time before that Robert Wilken, a leading patristics scholar teaching at the University of Virginia, left the ELCA to become a Roman Catholic. Then other Lutheran theological colleagues began to follow suit. Jay Rochelle, who for many years was my colleague and the chaplain at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago joined the Orthodox Church. Why? Leonard Klein, pastor of a large Lutheran parish in York, Pennsylvania, and former editor of Lutheran Forum and Forum Letter, last year left the ELCA to study for the Roman Catholic priesthood.


Why? This year Bruce Marshall, who taught theology for about fifteen years at St. Olaf College and was a long-standing member of the International Lutheran-Orthodox Dialogue, has left the ELCA to enter the Roman Catholic Church. Why? David Fagerberg, formerly professor of religion at Concordia College, although coming from a strong Norwegian Lutheran family, left the ELCA for the Roman Catholic Church, and now teaches at the University of Notre Dame.


Reinhard Huetter, a German Lutheran from Erlangen University, came to the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago fifteen years ago to teach theology and ethics, now teaches at Duke Divinity School, and this year became a Roman Catholic. Why? Mickey Mattox, a theologian who recently served at the Lutheran Ecumenical Institute in Strasbourg and now teaches at Marquette University, has recently begun the process of becoming a Roman Catholic. In all these cases the transition involves spouses and children, making it incredibly more difficult. Why are they doing this? Is there a message in these decisions for those who have ears to hear?


All of these colleagues have given candid explanations of their decisions to their families, colleagues, and friends. While the individuals involved have provided a variety of reasons, there is one thread that runs throughout the stories they tell. It is not merely the pull of Orthodoxy or Catholicism that enchants them, but also the push from the ELCA, as they witness with alarm the drift of their church into the morass of what some have called Liberal Protestantism. They are convinced that the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America has become just another liberal protestant denomination.


Hence, they have decided that they can no longer be a part of that. Especially, they say, they are not willing to raise their children in a church that they believe has lost its moorings in the great tradition of evangelical (small e) and catholic (small c) orthodoxy (small o), which was at the heart of Luther's reformatory teaching and the Lutheran Confessional Writings. They are saying that the Roman Catholic Church is now more hospitable to confessional Lutheran teaching than the church in which they were baptized and confirmed. Can this possibly be true?


I have decided, without any doubt about it, that I could not re-invent myself to become something else than I was raised to be by my Madagascar missionary parents - an heir of the Lutheran confessing movement. Through theological study and ecumenical engagement I thought I had learned something about what it means to be Lutheran. I have written many books and articles, preached and published many sermons - leaving a long paper trail - over a period of five decades, explaining what it means to be Lutheran.


There is nothing in all of those communications that accommodates liberal Protestantism, which Karl Barth called a "heresy," an assessment with which I fully agree. If it is true that the ELCA has become just another liberal protestant denomination, that is a condition tantamount to heresy. The most damning thing in my view that can be charged against the ELCA is that it is just another liberal protestant denomination.


Are all these theologians wrong in their assessment of the ELCA? I wish I could deny it. I have been looking for some convincing evidence to the contrary, because I am not about to cut and run. There is no place I know of where to go.


I do know, however, that the kind of Lutheranism that I learned - from Nygren, Aulen, Bring, Pinomaa, Schlink, P. Brunner, Bonhoeffer, Pannenberg, Piepkorn, Quanbeck, Preus, and Lindbeck, not to mention the pious missionary teachers from whom I learned the Bible, the Catechism, and the Christian faith -- and taught in a Lutheran parish and seminary for many years is now marginalized to the point of near extinction. In looking for evidence that could convincingly contradict the charge that the ELCA has become just another liberal protestant denomination, it would seem reasonable to examine what is produced by its publishing house, theological schools, magazines, publications, church council resolutions, commission statements, task force recommendations, statements and actions by its bishops.


The end result is an embarrassment; there is not much there to refute the charge. As Erik Petersen said about 19h century German Protestantism, all that is left of the Reformation heritage is the aroma from an empty bottle. A lot of the pious piffle remains, but then, so was Adolf von Harnack a pious man. All the heretics of the ancient church were pious men.


Our pastors and laity are being deceived by a lot of pietistic aroma, but the bottle is empty. Just ask these fine theologians - all friends and colleagues of mine - who have left the ELCA. They are not stupid people; they don't tell lies; they don't make rash decisions. They are all serious Christians. What is happening is nothing less than a tragedy. The ELCA is driving out the best and the brightest theologians of our day, not because it is too Lutheran, but because it has become putatively just another liberal protestant denomination.


I would think that this is a situation that ought to concern you immensely as well as all the leadership cadres of the ELCA. But might it also be the case that the very persons who ought to be troubled by this phenomenon will say to themselves (perhaps not out loud), "good riddance, we won't be bothered by those dissenting voices anymore? We wish more of their ilk would leave."


I must tell you that I read all your episcopal letters that come across my desk. But I must also tell you that your stated convictions, punctuated by many pious sentiments, are not significantly distinguishable from those that come from the liberal protestant leaders of other American denominations. I do not disagree with your political leaning to the left. I am a life-long political liberal, unlike many of my friends. My wife and I opposed the unjust war against Vietnam in the 60's and 70's, and we have with equal conviction opposed the foolhardy invasion of Iraq by the Bush administration. We also supported the ELCA in its ecumenical actions to re-institute the episcopal office by means of passing the CCM as well as to adopt the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification with the Vatican.


But none of that equates with transforming Lutheranism into a liberal protestant denomination, in terms of doctrine, worship, and morality. When I finished my graduate studies at Harvard and Heidelberg, I was ordained by the ELC and served a parish in North Minneapolis, simultaneously teaching at Luther Seminary. At that time I was instrumental in founding Dialog, a journal of theology, together with Robert Jenson, Roy Harrisville, Kent Knutson, James Burtness, and others, in order to draw midwest Lutheranism into the world-wide orbit of Lutheran theology.


We were not ecumenically oriented at the start. At that time no Luther Seminary professors were dealing with the issues posed by Bultmann, Tillich, Bonhoeffer, Barth, Brunner, Aulen, Nygren and many others. Dialog got the reputation of being a journal edited by young upstarts who thought they knew better. It seemed to us then that most of our professors were not very well informed. But they were good Lutherans, not a single heretic among them. Heresy was not the problem at that time. The journal that our group founded in 1961 has now become the voice of a liberal protestant version of Lutheranism.


Robert Jenson and I resigned from the journal as its editors in 1991 to found a new journal, Pro Ecclesia, a Journal of Catholic and Evangelical Theology. In the last fourteen years we have published the articles of theologians of all traditions - Lutheran, Anglican, Catholic, Evangelical, and Orthodox - exhibiting the truth that we all share common ground in the Great Tradition. The same cannot be said of Dialog anymore. It has become a function of the California ethos of religion and morality, nothing seriously Lutheran about it anymore, except the aroma of an empty bottle. Too bad. I was its editor for twenty years and Jenson for ten years, but now in our judgment it has become, perhaps even unwittingly, the very opposite of what we intended. The journal now expresses its belief that to be prophetic is to become the mouthpiece of the denominational bureaucracy, that is, to attack the few dissenting voices in the ELCA.


One day a church historian will write the history of Lutheranism in America. There will be a few paragraphs trying to explain how the self-destruction of confessional orthodox Lutheranism came about around the turn of the millennium and how it underwent a metamorphosis into a liberal protestant denomination. Recently in an issue of the Lutheran Magazine you expressed your hope that Lutherans could some day soon celebrate Holy Communion with Roman Catholics. My instant reaction was: it is becoming less and less likely, as the ELCA is being taken hostage by forces alien to the solid traditions Lutherans share with Roman Catholics. The confessional chasm is actually becoming wider. So much for the JDDJ!


The agreement becomes meaningless when Lutheranism embarks on a trajectory that leads to rank antinomianism. Where do we go from here? I am going nowhere. Meanwhile, I am hearing rumors about a possible schism or something about the formation of a dissenting synod. None of that will redound to the benefit of the one, holy, catholic and apostolic church we confess in the Creed. Each person and congregation will do what they deem fitting and appropriate in view of the apostasy that looms on the horizon of our beloved Lutheran Church.


My friend Wolfhart Pannenberg has stated that a church that cannot take the Scriptures seriously is no longer a church that belongs to Jesus Christ. That is not an original statement of his or mine, but one said by every orthodox theologian in the Great Tradition, including Athanasius and Augustine, as well as Martin Luther and John Calvin.


Does the ELCA take the Scriptures seriously? We will soon find out. Whoever passes the issue off as simply a hermeneutical squabble is not being honest - "we have our interpretation and you have yours." Who is to judge who is right? The upshot is ecclesiastical anarchy, sometimes called pluralism. To each his own. Chacun son gout!


I am extremely sorry it has come to this doctrinally unstable situation in the church I was ordained to serve almost half a century ago. My father and two of his brothers served this church in Madagascar and China. My brother and sister served this church in the Camaroons and Madagascar. My cousins have served this church as ordained ministers in this country and abroad for decades. Knowing them as well as I do, I am confident in stating their belief that this church in some of its expressions is not remaining truly faithful to the kind of promises they made upon their ordination to the Christian ministry.


Can the situation which I have described in stark terms be remedied? Have we reached the point of no return? Are we now hopelessly mired in what Karl Barth identified as "Kulturprotestantismus?" I know of about half a dozen Lutheran renewal groups desperately trying to call the ELCA back to its foundational texts and traditions. Would they exist if there were no problem that needs to be addressed? How many congregations and pastors have left or are leaving the ELCA for other associations?


One day we will have to answer before the judgment seat of God as to what we have done for and against the Church of Jesus Christ. There will be no one by our side to help us find the words to use in response. All of us will have many things for which to repent and to implore God's forgiveness.


And we will all cry out, "Lord, have mercy!"


Sincerely in Christ our Lord,
Carl E. Braaten


Dr. Carl Braaten is a Lutheran Theologian and author.
He is professor emeritus of Systematic Theology of the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago.


Dr. Hanson is the Presiding Bishop of the ELCA and president of the Lutheran World Federation in Geneva.
« Last Edit: April 01, 2020, 01:18:51 PM by Brian Stoffregen »
"The church … had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]