Author Topic: Mary, Mother of our Lord  (Read 4579 times)

Eileen Smith

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Mary, Mother of our Lord
« on: August 15, 2014, 02:54:31 PM »
May we take a moment today to honor Mary, Mother of our Lord.  From the Center for Liturgy (and with permission): 

Mary,
a quiet, demurring handmaiden,
cried out in raucous joy,
extolling God,
singing a radical song of promise.

Spirit of God,
let us join with Mary
and declare your greatness,
and with whole heart’s delight pray with her

that you give hope to the lowly, that they be lifted up,
a wealth of good food for the hungry
and your mercy for
all people in
all times.

David Garner

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Re: Mary, Mother of our Lord
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2014, 02:58:51 PM »
Thank you for this.  "My soul doth magnify the Lord, and my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Savior."
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Charles Austin

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Re: Mary, Mother of our Lord
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2014, 03:19:04 PM »
I have often moved this commemoration to the nearest Sunday, so that we Lutherans can indeed celebrate.
Retired ELCA pastor. Iowa born. Now in Minnesota. Article coming up in Lutheran Forum journal. Now would be a good time to subscribe.
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Matt Hummel

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Re: Mary, Mother of our Lord
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2014, 03:31:12 PM »
Read an interesting piece on fetal microchimerism earlier today. Something about which to think on the Feast of the Assumption.
Matt Hummel


“The chief purpose of life, for any of us, is to increase according to our capacity our knowledge of God by all means we have, and to be moved by it to praise and thanks.”

― J.R.R. Tolkien

David Garner

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Re: Mary, Mother of our Lord
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2014, 03:37:08 PM »
I have often moved this commemoration to the nearest Sunday, so that we Lutherans can indeed celebrate.

Why can it not be celebrated on the feast day?
Orthodox Reader and former Lutheran (LCMS and WELS).

Weedon

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Re: Mary, Mother of our Lord
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2014, 04:02:23 PM »
O higher than the Cherubim,
More glorious than the Seraphim,
Lead their praises, alleluia!
Thou Bearer of the Eternal Word,
Most gracious, magnify the Lord.
Alleluia! Alleluia! Alleluia! Alleluia! Alleluia!

We commemorated in Chapel today and I gave my usual homily commemorating the falling asleep in her dear Son of the Mother of God:

I remember when the angel came and told me, and my heart burst with joy and terror.

I remember when I came to the door of Zechariah’s house and Eliabeth knew my secret and my heart melted and my eyes burned with tears and my mouth prophesied.

I remember when I felt your movement first inside my body, and I realized that I was the living ark of the living God.

I remember when first I saw your face, and touched your hands, and looked into my Joseph’s eyes.

I remember when they came creeping in to see you, to worship you, the shepherds of the night, and told me songs of angels and glory in the highest and peace on earth.

I remember when we brought you to the temple and the old man took you in his arms and blessed God, ready to die, and told me of pain yet to come.

I remember when they came from the East and bowed before you as I held you and gave their gifts - the gold, the incense and the myrrh, while the star's light shone upon us.

I remember when he woke me and we fled into the night ahead of the terror of Herod’s sword.

I remember when we came home at last, and people looked and talked, but you were all our joy.

I remember when you stayed behind, when you left us, and we found you in the temple and my heart rose up in fear realizing that you chose to abide in the place of sacrifice and death.

I remember when you spoke to me in roughness and yet made the water into wine.

I remember when we came to make you take your rest and you taught me that all these in need were dear to you as your own family.

I remember when they took you, tortured you, and crucified you; and before my eyes rose up the old man in the temple – his words haunted me still – and a sword ran me through as I watched you dying.

I remember when you looked on me and the beloved one and gave us to each other for all our days.

I remember when the light died in your eyes and my heart sank beyond tears and words.

I remember after the empty days when they came and told me that you lived again, and joy flooded my heart, and I knew then what I had always known - your every promise was true.

I remember when we prayed together after you had gone into heaven and the Spirit came in wind and flame.

I remember how they went and told the news to all the world. And I welcomed each new believer as my beloved child, a brother of my Son, the King of all.

I remember it all now as I die, as I lay my head down in death.

My Son, I am not afraid. I go to you, to you who have conquered death, to you who are the Forgiveness of all sins. Receive me, child. Receive me.

I remember. I remember. I remember.

Matt Hummel

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Re: Mary, Mother of our Lord
« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2014, 05:03:02 PM »
Fetal Microchimerism- is the process in which cells from the child carried in utero by the mother cross the placental blood barrier and reside within the mother, and reside.  In other words, Mary carried within her blood some part of her son.

I am NOT using this scientifically documented phenomenon as a lock down proof of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin. But it is one of those things that makes one go, "Hmmmm...."

As for the Assumption, I remember an interesting argument for it from an Anglo-Catholic friend of mine in college. Not that he necessarily accepted the doctrine, but he asked rhetorically, "So- can we visit her grave? And who has her relics?"  Again- absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence, but make ya think.
Matt Hummel


“The chief purpose of life, for any of us, is to increase according to our capacity our knowledge of God by all means we have, and to be moved by it to praise and thanks.”

― J.R.R. Tolkien

David Garner

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Re: Mary, Mother of our Lord
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2014, 05:34:58 PM »
We don't hold to the Assumption as I have always understood it to be Roman Catholic teaching (that Mary was taken up to heaven without dying).  But there is a pious belief among many Orthodox that she was assumed into heaven after her natural death.

Having said that, something hit me like a ton of bricks about a week ago at the Feast of the Transfiguration.  Our priest said in his homily that the icon of Christ shows Christ with the garment of divinity (red), but cloaked in humanity (blue).  He indicated that this is because Christ is a divine person Who assumed a human nature, and therefore "put on" humanity, entering our mortal state to defeat sin, death and the devil.  Here is one similar to the icon we have on the iconostasis:

http://www.bethel-ucity.org/images/1025-5264a.jpg

He didn't mention this in the homily, but I asked him about it afterward -- I noticed when I looked at the icon of the Theotokos, her garments were exactly reversed:

http://cdn2.bigcommerce.com/server1600/pw4nhjs/products/127/images/320/1220__36134.1372976739.490.588.JPG?c=2

Which means, accepting the theological point he made about Christ, the Theotokos is a human person, cloaked in divinity.

When we say she is the picture of a Christian, the very icon of who we are to become, I think this icon displays that perfectly.  She held in her womb Him Who made the universe.  And in so doing, she is completely wrapped up in His righteousness, as we are to be clothed in His righteousness in our baptism.  I thought it was a beautiful image as the Dormition came and went, and one I have held to through the celebration of this season honoring our Mother.
« Last Edit: August 15, 2014, 05:46:46 PM by David Garner »
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David Garner

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Re: Mary, Mother of our Lord
« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2014, 05:37:59 PM »
Also, it now occurs to me, the feast days of the Theotokos are celebrated using the liturgical color blue.  I need to ask him about that one tomorrow.
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Weedon

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Re: Mary, Mother of our Lord
« Reply #9 on: August 15, 2014, 05:41:46 PM »
David,

Interesting the blue. In our calendar, as you no doubt remember, they are all white. I went to St. Paul's this afternoon wondering if the new painting had shown up yet. It has not sadly. It will hang opposite the large image of St. Paul: the holy family. St. Joseph beside the Mother of God and with them the Holy Child.

David Garner

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Re: Mary, Mother of our Lord
« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2014, 05:46:14 PM »
David,

Interesting the blue. In our calendar, as you no doubt remember, they are all white. I went to St. Paul's this afternoon wondering if the new painting had shown up yet. It has not sadly. It will hang opposite the large image of St. Paul: the holy family. St. Joseph beside the Mother of God and with them the Holy Child.

I do remember.  We reserve white for major feasts for Our Lord, chiefly Pascha, Nativity and Theophany, though I believe we used it also for the Transfiguration.  One day I intend to study the differences between our respective practices.  My experience is that both have deep meaning, but I'm curious to find out why they don't share the same meaning.
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Keith Falk

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Re: Mary, Mother of our Lord
« Reply #11 on: August 15, 2014, 05:56:51 PM »
I have often moved this commemoration to the nearest Sunday, so that we Lutherans can indeed celebrate.

Why can it not be celebrated on the feast day?


It can - and is at Peace Lutheran in Edmond, Oklahoma.
Rev. Keith Falk, STS

David Garner

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Re: Mary, Mother of our Lord
« Reply #12 on: August 15, 2014, 05:59:42 PM »
I have often moved this commemoration to the nearest Sunday, so that we Lutherans can indeed celebrate.

Why can it not be celebrated on the feast day?

It can - and is at Peace Lutheran in Edmond, Oklahoma.

Yes, we always did them too at our first Lutheran parish.  I assume there is a reason Pastor Austin said "indeed celebrate," though.  I'm honestly curious what it is.

One thing I missed (and found again!) during the time we left that first Lutheran parish for a couple of others before becoming Orthodox was those weekday feast days.  I'm wondering why some choose not to do them, or to move them to Sunday, etc.  Not trying to be snarky with Pastor Austin, I'm seriously curious.
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Weedon

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Re: Mary, Mother of our Lord
« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2014, 06:21:30 PM »
But I think we need to look at it the right way round:

those who "show up" (i.e., whom you can see) are invariably the tiniest portion of the Church that is gathered for worship, for the Church never gathers with a piece of herself, but always the whole. If you only see three or four gathered on a given feast day, be of good cheer! "Where two or three are gathered in My name...." So Christ is there. And with Him His whole Body. We'll all see it one day, but until that day we all can believe it, rejoice, and be comforted.

Keith Falk

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Re: Mary, Mother of our Lord
« Reply #14 on: August 15, 2014, 06:23:46 PM »
We had 30 come to Ascension worship; hardly a private mass. Different congregations may face different realities.
Rev. Keith Falk, STS