Author Topic: Stations of the Cross  (Read 9282 times)

Eileen Smith

  • ALPB Contribution Leader
  • *****
  • Posts: 2140
    • View Profile
Stations of the Cross
« on: February 27, 2013, 08:58:42 PM »
I know there are some on this forum who will absolutely no problem with WELCA's Lenten resource, "Stations of the Cross" but as one who does no support the direction of the ELCA, I think we've really gone a bit too far with this resource.  Christ's journey to the cross compared to the gay and lesbian fight for "the pursuit of justice."  Link and description follow:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/believeoutloud/sets/72157632873157887/with/8513333475/

Many of you know Mary Button for the resources she's written for Women of the ELCA or articles for Cafe. You also might remember art that Mary created last year during Lent that she shared widely. Mary's done it again, creating Stations of the Cross that depict the struggle of the LGBT community in the 20th and 21st centuries. Mary offers this art for your Lenten journey. 
 
 
Stations of the Cross are a series of artistic representations of the Passion of Christ, depicting the story of his death from his sentencing to the laying of his body in the tomb. The fourteen images are used devotionally during the Lenten season for prayer and reflection. They provide an opportunity for Christians to enter into the story of Christ's suffering and experience a relationship with a God who suffers with us.

This series of stations combine images depicting the struggle for LGBT equality through the 20th and 21st century. Each station illustrates the many ways in which the pursuit of justice for LGBT peoples is embedded in the history of the United States.

GalRev83

  • Guest
Re: Stations of the Cross
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2013, 10:15:17 PM »
I used to write for "Lutheran Woman Today," and wrote LCW and WELCA Bible studies "back in the day." And while I am sure that, for some,  this will seem like a meaningful devotional exercise - to me it is distressing. And I also feel it goes a bit far.

Thanks for sharing - I think.  ;)

J. Thomas Shelley

  • ALPB Contribution Leader
  • *****
  • Posts: 3996
    • View Profile
Re: Stations of the Cross
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2013, 10:52:09 PM »
It diminishes, nay trivializes the one perfect sacrifice, satisfaction, and oblation of the Cross by likening it to any human struggle for justice, much less a "struggle" which has as its heart the "delisting" of a behavior as sin while simultaneously condemning those who refuse to embrace such behavior as normal and blessed as being the real sinners.




« Last Edit: February 28, 2013, 07:49:22 AM by Rev. J. Thomas Shelley, STS »
Greek Orthodox-Ecumenical Patriarchate

Baptized, Confirmed, and Ordained United Methodist.
Served as a Lutheran Pastor October 31, 1989 - October 31, 2014.
Charter member of the first chapter of the Society of the Holy Trinity.

Chrismated Antiochian Orthodox, eve of Mary of Egypt Sunday, A.D. 2015

GoCubsGo

  • Guest
Re: Stations of the Cross
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2013, 11:10:40 PM »
I'm trying to remember why I left the ELCA... hmm... can't put my finger on it... hmmm...  Might be this kind of stuff!

BTW, come join us for Stations of the Cross on Friday nights at 7PM at St. Boniface--my local parish.  I promise no absurd depictions of the stations.

Eileen Smith

  • ALPB Contribution Leader
  • *****
  • Posts: 2140
    • View Profile
Re: Stations of the Cross
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2013, 08:06:04 AM »
I'm guessing you may be in Chicago GoCubsGo; or me, that might mean a long trek!  That being said, I do go to my husband's parish each Friday night in Lent for Stations and it is a very beautiful service.  In my Lutheran parish, we have Stations on the Monday of Holy Week - again, very beautifully done.  Quite honestly, I have a foot in Rome and the other is slowly following.  While classes I've taken present a beautiful expression of the Christian faith, things such as this ?devotion? help the other foot along.

GalRev83

  • Guest
Re: Stations of the Cross
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2013, 08:37:33 AM »
Well, Eileen, before long we will all be excoriated for "tsp-tsk"-ing at the ELCA. But I think this is a pretty flagrant example of something the denomination should not have approved through the act of publication and promotion.

Donna

Dadoo

  • ALPB Contribution Leader
  • *****
  • Posts: 3054
    • View Profile
Re: Stations of the Cross
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2013, 09:01:21 AM »
I always thought that the stations were to help the believer contemplate the crucifixion and per chance gain insight into the work of salvation. At some point and I only noticed 25 years ago, the stations were "appropriated" and Jesus via dolorosa became "our" via dolorosa on which Jesus was our companion who was in solidarity with us in that walk.  The stations of the cross for the environment or for the poor etc all are in existence. THe fact that there is a gay one does not surprise me.(It is referenced here from the flikr site of a gay group BTW. )   With any of them, I guess I am supposed to feel moved to be on the oppressed group's side because they managed to write a depiction of the via dolorosa with themselves in Jesus' place.

So let us note that the stations have been turned around many moons ago, making them a matter of Jesus contemplating and somehow endorsing our walk of suffering instead of the other way around. Let us also note that Luther once wrote that if by contemplating the crucifixion you are moved to feel sorry for Jesus then you have missed the point of the crucifixion in its entirety.

One thing I am missing: WHere is the link from WELCA to this flikr bucket?
Peter Kruse

Diversity and tolerance are very complex concepts. Rigid conformity is needed to ensure their full realization. - Mike Adams

Eileen Smith

  • ALPB Contribution Leader
  • *****
  • Posts: 2140
    • View Profile
Re: Stations of the Cross
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2013, 09:34:55 AM »
I always thought that the stations were to help the believer contemplate the crucifixion and per chance gain insight into the work of salvation. At some point and I only noticed 25 years ago, the stations were "appropriated" and Jesus via dolorosa became "our" via dolorosa on which Jesus was our companion who was in solidarity with us in that walk.  The stations of the cross for the environment or for the poor etc all are in existence. THe fact that there is a gay one does not surprise me.(It is referenced here from the flikr site of a gay group BTW. )   With any of them, I guess I am supposed to feel moved to be on the oppressed group's side because they managed to write a depiction of the via dolorosa with themselves in Jesus' place.

So let us note that the stations have been turned around many moons ago, making them a matter of Jesus contemplating and somehow endorsing our walk of suffering instead of the other way around. Let us also note that Luther once wrote that if by contemplating the crucifixion you are moved to feel sorry for Jesus then you have missed the point of the crucifixion in its entirety.

One thing I am missing: WHere is the link from WELCA to this flikr bucket?

I've not seen in the Stations of the Cross anything about "feeling sorry for Jesus."  It is more a sense of the profound - of all that Jesus has done for us. 

The link that I had posted is:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/believeoutloud/sets/72157632873157887/with/8513333475/
I just cut and pasted it into my browser and it worked - but some may have a problem with it. 

Satis Est

  • Guest
Re: Stations of the Cross
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2013, 10:06:08 AM »
  After looking at the link you had posted, I went to the WELCA website and tried to find the Lenten resource "Stations of the Cross."  I have not been able to locate it on their website.  Where did you find this?  I have not subscribed to their publication for several years so I cannot check that resource.  Is this online on the WELCA site, and if so, where?

Dadoo

  • ALPB Contribution Leader
  • *****
  • Posts: 3054
    • View Profile
Re: Stations of the Cross
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2013, 10:34:27 AM »
  After looking at the link you had posted, I went to the WELCA website and tried to find the Lenten resource "Stations of the Cross."  I have not been able to locate it on their website.  Where did you find this?  I have not subscribed to their publication for several years so I cannot check that resource.  Is this online on the WELCA site, and if so, where?

The link is on the FaceBook page of WELCA - I discovered since asking the same question.
Peter Kruse

Diversity and tolerance are very complex concepts. Rigid conformity is needed to ensure their full realization. - Mike Adams

Coach-Rev

  • Guest
Re: Stations of the Cross
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2013, 12:21:46 PM »
Yes, if you go the "Women of the ELCA" facebook page, it is visible including the Flickr link and the description upstream.

Distressing.  But not surprising.

Coach-Rev

  • Guest
Re: Stations of the Cross
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2013, 12:27:22 PM »
So let us note that the stations have been turned around many moons ago, making them a matter of Jesus contemplating and somehow endorsing our walk of suffering instead of the other way around. Let us also note that Luther once wrote that if by contemplating the crucifixion you are moved to feel sorry for Jesus then you have missed the point of the crucifixion in its entirety.

I posed this question on their facebook page.  We shall see what the response will be.  It is apparently an open page that allows for any user to post, as I was able to without "liking" their page or being approved.

Eileen Smith

  • ALPB Contribution Leader
  • *****
  • Posts: 2140
    • View Profile
Re: Stations of the Cross
« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2013, 12:37:17 PM »
http://www.flickr.com/photos/believeoutloud/sets/72157632873157887/with/8513333475/

With apologies - this is the only link I have.  As well, I just now cut and pasted it into my browser and it worked - I came up with flickr from Yahoo - Stations of the Cross.  From there, I was able to click onto each station and find the "devotion" - as an example:  Station 13: 

Station 13: Jesus is taken down from the cross

2004: In sweeping homophobic legislative measures same-sex marriage is banned in Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Virginia, and Wisconsin

Coach-Rev

  • Guest
Re: Stations of the Cross
« Reply #13 on: February 28, 2013, 12:45:19 PM »
This is the exchange thus far, minus my response after:

Quote
me:   Since when do the "stations of the cross" focus on our suffering, and NOT on Christ's? I believe this to be a misappropriation of the purpose and reason behind what the stations of the cross are to mean for us. What say you?

Women of the ELCA:   As the text that accompanies the images indicates, the images are of Christ's suffering and allow us to enter into that story.

"Stations of the Cross are a series of artistic representations of the Passion of Christ, depicting the story of his death from his sentencing to the laying of his body in the tomb.

The fourteen images are used devotionally during the Lenten season for prayer and reflection. They provide an opportunity for Christians to enter into the story of Christ's suffering and experience a relationship with a God who suffers with us.

This series of stations combine images depicting the struggle for LGBT equality through the 20th and 21st century. Each station illustrates the many ways in which the pursuit of justice for LGBT peoples is embedded in the history of the United States."

If I'd wanted them to parrot back the accompanying text from their post, I would've asked.  The answer does nothing to present a valid argument as to why human suffering should supplant the suffering of Christ.

pastorg1@aol.com

  • ALPB Contribution Leader
  • *****
  • Posts: 1037
    • View Profile
Re: Stations of the Cross
« Reply #14 on: February 28, 2013, 02:28:27 PM »
From Benedictus Day by Day with Pope Benedict XVI.
February 28- the day of his retirement.
Excepts:

"A Jesus who sanctions everything is a Jesus without the cross...As a matter of fact, the cross is being increasingly banished from theology and reinterpreted as just a vexatious mischance or a purely political event... The cross as reconciliation, as a means of forgiving and saving, is incompatible with a certain modern mode of thought... Forgiveness has to do with truth. That is why it requires the Son's cross and our conversion."

Peter
Pete Garrison, STS