Name A Seminary Professor Who Influenced Your Ministry

Started by Dave Likeness, January 30, 2013, 01:51:29 PM

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DCharlton

Paul Harms, Walt Bouman, Rudolf Featherstone, Mark Powell, Wayne Stumme, Tim Huffman
David Charlton  

Was Algul Siento a divinity school?

Dadoo

Peter Kruse

Diversity and tolerance are very complex concepts. Rigid conformity is needed to ensure their full realization. - Mike Adams

RPG

Quote from: Rev. Spaceman on January 30, 2013, 08:49:53 PM
And, though he was retired long before I started seminary, Roy Harrisville Jr. was influential if for no other reason than sheer entertainment!

I second that motion, Spaceman.

RPG+
The Rev. Ryan P. Gage
Eureka, SD

R. T. Fouts

Too many to name...

If I had to name one I would say Robert Kolb has influenced me the most.       

Close runners up would be Norman Nagel, Charles Arand, Kent Burreson, Jeff Gibbs.   
----------------
Dr. R.T. Fouts, M.Div, Ph.D.

David M. Frye, OblSB

Eric Gritsch, Robert Jenson, and Gerhard Krodel. One semester I had all three ... worked the hardest I ever did in school ... and was blessed by it.
David M. Frye, OblSB

+ Ut in omnibus glorificetur Deus.
+ That God may be glorified in all things.

Matt Staneck

I'll graduate in May, but figured I'd chime in now...

Gibbs, Kolb, Biermann, Meyer

Blessed to have President Meyer right now in a hom elective, and blessed to finish my seminary career off with the other three in the spring quarter.

M. Staneck
Matt Staneck, Pastor
St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church
Queens, NY

Birkholz

Most influential- Norman Nagel
Others who played important roles- Ron Feuerhahn, Jeff Gibbs, Reed Lessing
MTh - John Kleinig
(CSL '04; ALC '05)
Pastor Mark Birkholz
Zion Lutheran Church
Naperville, IL
www.zionnaperville.org

John_Hannah

Arthur Carl Piepkorn, Richard John Neuhaus (even though he was not a seminary professor), and Robert Bertram.


Peace, JOHN
Pr. JOHN HANNAH, STS

Dave Benke

The Atlantic District/East Coast guys in my era were all committed to engaging the world with the Gospel of hope in a brash/infectious way.  Those who were from here or hung out here a lot included
John Tietjen
Andy Weyermann
Bob Smith
Ralph Klein
Bob Werberig
Ozzie Hoffmann

And just for good measure
Dave Scaer
Richard Klann

The Elertians - Weyermann, Schroeder and Bertram

The OT guys - Von Rohr Sauer, Klein, Habel, Graesser

All investigative theologians engaging the critical thinking processes

Dave Benke
It's OK to Pray

Harvey_Mozolak

as we list names, like LCMS type folks...

it does interest me that so many of them, whom any number of us list as sources of more than inspiration, would today be classified as liberal (using the term liberally) and yet when they were our profs they were not decidedly so, perhaps at the edge things but not outside any pale on any issue and in fact they were very solid in things that are still important like the core of the Faith, Gospel, Lutheranism and so forth...

I still wonder why so few, almost if any, profs, theologians, bishops and so forth in the ELCA who came from the LCMS/AELC background did not have at  least some pause in the movement that has led to more a more universalistic view of salvation, the sexuality issues and so forth...

to me it seems that no matter what position you take you ought to be very critical of it as you were of the place you left... may be more so because of your personal investment and the way hubris tends to veil the ego...

how can some who were so central on the Gospel have forsaken some of the deposit of the faith, and with seeming ease?

Let me give a for instance that has nothing to do with the usual issues.   As I look at my own journey...  I once hated the over use of the terms Word of God and devil, for instance.  I did not reject them but found that Word of God had replaced Christ with a more "biblicistic" viewpoint and the devil was being given more than his due and our responsibility was being replaced by the excuse of Satanic temptation.  OK, even assume that that was true.  I then noticed that Word of God and devil were completely disappearing as terms in my sermons and teaching and when I realized that, I knew that was error and needed to be re-corrected.

Anyone...?   Do I make any sense?

Harvey Mozolak
Harvey Mozolak
Harvey S. Mozolak
my poetry blog is listed below:

http://lineandletterlettuce.blogspot.com

John_Hannah

Quote from: Harvey_Mozolak on January 31, 2013, 08:12:07 AM
as we list names, like LCMS type folks...

it does interest me that so many of them, whom any number of us list as sources of more than inspiration, would today be classified as liberal (using the term liberally) and yet when they were our profs they were not decidedly so, perhaps at the edge things but not outside any pale on any issue and in fact they were very solid in things that are still important like the core of the Faith, Gospel, Lutheranism and so forth...

I still wonder why so few, almost if any, profs, theologians, bishops and so forth in the ELCA who came from the LCMS/AELC background did not have at  least some pause in the movement that has led to more a more universalistic view of salvation, the sexuality issues and so forth...

to me it seems that no matter what position you take you ought to be very critical of it as you were of the place you left... may be more so because of your personal investment and the way hubris tends to veil the ego...

how can some who were so central on the Gospel have forsaken some of the deposit of the faith, and with seeming ease?

Let me give a for instance that has nothing to do with the usual issues.   As I look at my own journey...  I once hated the over use of the terms Word of God and devil, for instance.  I did not reject them but found that Word of God had replaced Christ with a more "biblicistic" viewpoint and the devil was being given more than his due and our responsibility was being replaced by the excuse of Satanic temptation.  OK, even assume that that was true.  I then noticed that Word of God and devil were completely disappearing as terms in my sermons and teaching and when I realized that, I knew that was error and needed to be re-corrected.

Anyone...?   Do I make any sense?

Harvey Mozolak
Harvey Mozolak

Yes, Harvey, you do make sense. However, I find that many of the former LCMS folks have not gone as "liberal" as many suggest. For every "Larry Liberal" there was a Piepkorn or Neuhaus.


Peace, JOHN
Pr. JOHN HANNAH, STS

FrPeters

Perhaps the single best classrooom teacher I ever had, C. George Fry.  He made me want never to miss class.

Among the great thinkers who taught me to and compelled me to think theologically, David Scaer.

Among the almost irritatingly polite (I often wished he would tell some grandstanders to shut up), Kurt Marquart.

Among the most difficult teachers who earned my great respect, Bill Weinrich and Hank Kadai.

Among the most pastoral and truly loving individuals, Dean Wenthe.

These were only names drawn from people whose classes I took... if that were not a requirement the list would be significantly larger.  Most of the sem profs from my era (I entered nearly 40 years ago) are all dead, and, no slight against the dead, the ones today are, as a group, far better than I had entering sem education right after the big Missouri squabble.
Fr Larry Peters
Grace LCMS, Clarksville, TN
http://www.pastoralmeanderings.blogspot.com/

D. Engebretson

Quote from: FrPeters on January 31, 2013, 08:46:14 AM
Among the great thinkers who taught me to and compelled me to think theologically, David Scaer.

Dr. Scaer confronted your preconceived views and challenged your personal assumptions of orthodoxy, attempting to dismantle weak theologies and make of us, as you observe, pastors who could think theologically. This has undoubtedly influenced the way I teach catechesis even to this day. His approach probably seemed brash and abrasive to some, but there was a purpose in it.  If you came into seminary comfortable in thinking you already had it worked out you were never going to grow and would lack the humility to continue to learn.  I suspect that Scaer was trying to instill some of this in us by putting us in our place and reminding us that we were not yet there. 
Pastor Don Engebretson
St. Peter Lutheran Church of Polar (Antigo) WI

Charles_Austin

Dr. George Hoyer's son, Peter, was my pastor for several years before he retired. I only met his father once, back in the late 70s. But Peter was an outstanding preacher, so his father must have taught him well.

Satis Est

  Not a Lutheran (are they allowed to influence us?  :D):  the Rev. Geoffrey Rawthorn (later a bishop in the Episcopal Church).  For his witness to a deep Christian faith as he taught liturgics and the history of the Great Tradition to his students, many of whom came from profoundly non-liturgical church bodies.

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