Author Topic: A Wonderful Secular Essay on the Continuing Need for the Law (and the Gospel)  (Read 732 times)

totaliter vivens

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Well worth the read... I like Theodore Dalrymple very much.

http://www.city-journal.org/html/13_1_oh_to_be.html

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SPS



J. Thomas Shelley

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It has been exactly ten years since I last viewed a production of Macbeth.   The perfoming company had made the setting to resemble Nazi Germany with many of the players clad in uniforms of the Third Reich.

The performance stirred me deeply and I used many lines from Macbeth in my sermon on Ash Wednesday, using Macolm's address as the centerpiece in considering how we are by nature sinful and unclean:

But I have non: the king becoming graces,
   As justice, verity, temperance, stableness,
   Bounty, perseverance, mercy, lowliness,
   Devotion, patience, courage, fortitude,
   I have no relish of them; but abound
   In the division of each several crime,
   Acting it many ways.  Nay, had I power, I should
   Pour the sweet milk of concord into hell,
   Uproar the universal peace, confound
   all unity on earth.
Greek Orthodox-Ecumenical Patriarchate

Baptized, Confirmed, and Ordained United Methodist.
Served as a Lutheran Pastor October 31, 1989 - October 31, 2014.
Charter member of the first chapter of the Society of the Holy Trinity.

Chrismated Antiochian Orthodox, eve of Mary of Egypt Sunday, A.D. 2015

Charles_Austin

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Aaaah!
(says the unrepentant, unreconstructed, English major and theater-lover)
Intelligent references to the Bard of Avon...
"I can no other answer make but thanks,
And thanks, and ever thanks."
Twelfth Night, Act III, Scene 3.


G.Edward

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Quote
Macbeth warns us to preserve our humanity by accepting limitations to our actions. As Macduff says to Malcolm, when the latter presents himself as a heartless libertine:

             Boundless intemperance
     In nature is a tyranny.

Only if we obey rules—the rules that count—can we be free.

Good thing we ELCAers have 'bound conscience'  ;)

Michael Slusser

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Well worth the read... I like Theodore Dalrymple very much.

http://www.city-journal.org/html/13_1_oh_to_be.html

ἐν Χριστῷ

SPS


It is an excellent piece. But I don't see why it could not be taken as an essay on the need for natural law ethics, or classical virtue ethics, even more readily than on the need for "the Law (and the Gospel).

Peace,
Michael
Fr. Michael Slusser
Retired Roman Catholic priest and theologian

totaliter vivens

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Well worth the read... I like Theodore Dalrymple very much.

http://www.city-journal.org/html/13_1_oh_to_be.html

ἐν Χριστῷ

SPS


It is an excellent piece. But I don't see why it could not be taken as an essay on the need for natural law ethics, or classical virtue ethics, even more readily than on the need for "the Law (and the Gospel).

Peace,
Michael

Father Michael, you are, or course correct, but then natural law ethics or classical virtue ethics are subsets and exemplars of "THE LAW."

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SPS
« Last Edit: January 21, 2011, 03:11:50 PM by totaliter vivens »

Michael Slusser

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It is an excellent piece. But I don't see why it could not be taken as an essay on the need for natural law ethics, or classical virtue ethics, even more readily than on the need for "the Law (and the Gospel).

Peace,
Michael

Father Michael, you are, or course correct, but then natural law ethics or classical virtue ethics are subsets and exemplars of "THE LAW."

ἐν Χριστῷ

SPS


A Lutheran may see them that way, but our secular essayist would probably find them complete and meaningful in themselves, without any need to superimpose upon them the categories of Law and Gospel. In other words, the essay seems better suited to showing Lutherans how deeply the roots of Law and Gospel theology are sunk in human nature than to showing non-Lutherans the value of that theology.

Peace,
Michael
Fr. Michael Slusser
Retired Roman Catholic priest and theologian

totaliter vivens

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It is an excellent piece. But I don't see why it could not be taken as an essay on the need for natural law ethics, or classical virtue ethics, even more readily than on the need for "the Law (and the Gospel).

Peace,
Michael

Father Michael, you are, or course correct, but then natural law ethics or classical virtue ethics are subsets and exemplars of "THE LAW."

ἐν Χριστῷ

SPS


A Lutheran may see them that way, but our secular essayist would probably find them complete and meaningful in themselves, without any need to superimpose upon them the categories of Law and Gospel. In other words, the essay seems better suited to showing Lutherans how deeply the roots of Law and Gospel theology are sunk in human nature than to showing non-Lutherans the value of that theology.

Peace,
Michael

I won't quibble with you, Father Michael, about that. Lutheran that I am, it seems largely a distinction without a difference. In addition, I confess to a bit or marketing, invoking the theme of Law (and Gospel) in the thread title in the hopes of encouraging a largely Lutheran audience to take the time to read an essay I found enjoyable and instructive.

Has the forum lost all appreciation of pragmatism?  ;D

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SPS

totaliter vivens

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A Lutheran may see them that way, but our secular essayist would probably find them complete and meaningful in themselves, without any need to superimpose upon them the categories of Law and Gospel. In other words, the essay seems better suited to showing Lutherans how deeply the roots of Law and Gospel theology are sunk in human nature than to showing non-Lutherans the value of that theology.

Peace,
Michael

I think Dr. Dalrymple is not complete secular in his understanding of ethics and virtue. In another essay, he says, "The loss of the religious understanding of the human condition -- that man is a fallen creature for whom virtue is necessary but never fully attainable -- is a loss, not a gain, in true sophistication."

SPS

G.Edward

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Well worth the read... I like Theodore Dalrymple very much.

http://www.city-journal.org/html/13_1_oh_to_be.html

ἐν Χριστῷ

SPS


It is an excellent piece. But I don't see why it could not be taken as an essay on the need for natural law ethics, or classical virtue ethics, even more readily than on the need for "the Law (and the Gospel).

Peace,
Michael

Father Michael, you are, or course correct, but then natural law ethics or classical virtue ethics are subsets and exemplars of "THE LAW."

ἐν Χριστῷ

SPS


"The Law" Which Jesus Christ came to fulfill, so you're saying what?
« Last Edit: January 23, 2011, 05:18:28 PM by Gregory Davidson »