Author Topic: What Do You Look For When You Read the Bible?  (Read 1274 times)

FatherWilliam57

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Re: What Do You Look For When You Read the Bible?
« Reply #15 on: October 26, 2010, 10:16:08 AM »
I am not so sure I would dispense with the "love letter from God" idea out of hand.  I think about the letters my wife wrote to me while I was in the Navy.  What does one do with a love letter, especially when separated from their love?  They cherish it, re-read it, study it for every nuance present.  It prompts a loving response in return.  I wish more Christians cherished the Word of God in such a way.  Oh, love that will not let me go...

Perhaps I am reading Brian's comment in too simplistic a fashion.  Then again, some may be reading more into his statement than he intended.  Just musing...
The Rev. William B. Henry, Jr.
Interim Pastor, St. Peter's Lutheran Church, Evans City, PA
"Put on the whole armor of God."

Brian Stoffregen

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Re: What Do You Look For When You Read the Bible?
« Reply #16 on: October 26, 2010, 12:13:17 PM »
I am not so sure I would dispense with the "love letter from God" idea out of hand.  I think about the letters my wife wrote to me while I was in the Navy.  What does one do with a love letter, especially when separated from their love?  They cherish it, re-read it, study it for every nuance present.  It prompts a loving response in return.  I wish more Christians cherished the Word of God in such a way.  Oh, love that will not let me go...

Perhaps I am reading Brian's comment in too simplistic a fashion.  Then again, some may be reading more into his statement than he intended.  Just musing...

That's a pretty accurate sense of what I meant. I see the purposes of "love letters" are to (1) express the love of the sender towards the receiver and (2) win the love of the receiver for the sender. I am not thinking a sappy love, but agape that includes speaking the truth in love which may not always be received, at first, as love.
"The church had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]