Author Topic: Voter's Guide for Serious Christians  (Read 10899 times)

LutherMan

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Voter's Guide for Serious Christians
« on: October 20, 2010, 05:08:48 PM »
http://www.caaction.com/pdf/Voters-Guide-Christian-English-1p.pdf

With the upcoming elections, how many here use this little gem?  I first found it in the narthex of St. Patrick's Catholic Church in San Diego around the turn of this century.
 This thread is intended to be a serious political discussion, so discuss away.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2010, 05:10:47 PM by LutherMan »

LutherMan

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Re: Voter's Guide for Serious Christians
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2010, 04:48:29 AM »
Originally, the pamphlet was titled Voter's Guide for Serious Catholics.  I guess they re-issued it with an altered title for more general appeal.

James Gustafson

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Re: Voter's Guide for Serious Christians
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2010, 07:43:32 AM »
The irony here is that anyone interested enough to read a 16 page pamphlet about voting as a Christian is likely already aware of the things in the pamphlet.  They need to summarize it better, for the people that aren't interested enough but should be.   When the pamphlet speaks of, How Not to Vote,  1, not by party, 2, looks, 3, not just because someone claims to be a Christian, 4, whats in it for me, or 5, not vote for candidates that are right on lesser issues but wrong on major moral issues, the reader was already required to have read ten pages of other stuff, they probably didn't get that far.  

I'm not arguing with any single point of the pamphlet, I'm sure other would, but I wonder about the effectiveness of such a thing when I think the only people who would read the entire thing are those that don't need it.  We need brightly colored and eye grabbing graphic posters and loud 15 second commercials or we'll loose their attention.  ;)  ;D

Charles_Austin

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Re: Voter's Guide for Serious Christians
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2010, 07:54:01 AM »
Such pamphlets also assume that "serious Christians" will resonate to what is written in them. This, of course, enables those who do to feel righteous and superior to all those "non-serious Christians" who don't resonate to the pamphlet.
And, of course, it assumes that it presents the only "Christian" way to vote. We know that is not right.

LutherMan

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Has Conservatism Lost Its Soul?
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2010, 08:21:13 AM »
http://www.religiousconsultation.org/NEWS/has_conservatism_lost_its_soul.htm

Has Conservatism Lost Its Soul?
The Tea Party passions are the rancid emissions of class-based greed disguised with flags and Christian symbols.

By Daniel C. Maguire
daniel.maguire@marquette.edu

"Conservative" can mean a lot of things, even good things, but today
"conservative" has sunk to the moral basement. Dwight Eisenhower was
being a good conservative when he warned that "the military-industrial
complex" would milk our economy dry if not stopped, as indeed it has.
Nelson Rockefeller was being a good conservative when he said pregnant
women should be in charge of their pregnancies and not the government.
Teddy Roosevelt was being a good conservative when he pioneered
ecological sanity. Abraham Lincoln was a good conservative when he took
on slavery and when he supported state-sponsored banks to encourage
development, improve infrastructure and public education. These true
conservatives did not embrace the currently ensconced dogmatic naiveté
that government is the root of all evil.
<snip>

cssml

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Re: Voter's Guide for Serious Christians
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2010, 08:46:25 AM »
Originally, the pamphlet was titled Voter's Guide for Serious Catholics.  I guess they re-issued it with an altered title for more general appeal.

Yes, I have seen this guide distributed at some parishes in previous elections.  The original version includes the sources (CDF docs, CCC, Evangelium Vitae, etc) for the many quotes in it.  These are not shown as 'quotes' in the version you've posted.  For example, compare page 3, 3rd paragraph from the bottom.

  http://www.caaction.com/pdf/Voters-Guide-Catholic-English-1.pdf
  http://www.caaction.com/pdf/Voters-Guide-Christian-English-1p.pdf

Kurt Weinelt

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Re: Voter's Guide for Serious Christians
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2010, 11:14:24 AM »
I think liberalism has lost its soul. Consider the case of Juan Williams (noted liberal journalist), whom I admire because he speaks his mind regardless of political correctness, though I disagree with him more than I agree.
Full disclosure: I donate to my local NPR affiliate, but just to support its classical music programming.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/10/21/AR2010102101474.html
Kurt
"Learning about history is an antidote to the hubris of the present, the idea that everything in OUR lives is the ultimate." David McCullough

George Erdner

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Re: Voter's Guide for Serious Christians
« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2010, 11:22:40 AM »
The irony here is that anyone interested enough to read a 16 page pamphlet about voting as a Christian is likely already aware of the things in the pamphlet.  They need to summarize it better, for the people that aren't interested enough but should be.   When the pamphlet speaks of, How Not to Vote,  1, not by party, 2, looks, 3, not just because someone claims to be a Christian, 4, whats in it for me, or 5, not vote for candidates that are right on lesser issues but wrong on major moral issues, the reader was already required to have read ten pages of other stuff, they probably didn't get that far.  

I'm not arguing with any single point of the pamphlet, I'm sure other would, but I wonder about the effectiveness of such a thing when I think the only people who would read the entire thing are those that don't need it.  We need brightly colored and eye grabbing graphic posters and loud 15 second commercials or we'll loose their attention.  ;)  ;D

That could be a good thing. Like it or not, when electing people to legislative bodies, most of the time all important issues are decided by votes that are along strict party lines. Though we do not have a parliamentary system in the US, our Congress does operate very similarly to the UK's Parliament in some ways. Most important is that the party leadership on both sides of the aisle tends to determine how their people will vote. I'm not speaking about races for executive or judicial offices, where the qualifications of the individual truly matter. But when it comes to voting for someone for the US Congress or your state legislature, your best choice is to vote for the party platform that you want to see implemented. 

LutherMan

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Re: Has Conservatism Lost Its Soul?
« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2010, 12:05:33 PM »
As for Nelson Rockefeller, I had to laugh when that Eastern establishment liberal was referred to as a true conservative.
Mike
Coffee spewed out of my nose and mouth as I read that one because I was laughing out loudly.  I hade to wipe down the hospital's public monitor.

LutherMan

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Re: Voter's Guide for Serious Christians
« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2010, 04:30:09 PM »
I think liberalism has lost its soul. Consider the case of Juan Williams (noted liberal journalist), whom I admire because he speaks his mind regardless of political correctness, though I disagree with him more than I agree.
Full disclosure: I donate to my local NPR affiliate, but just to support its classical music programming.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/10/21/AR2010102101474.html
Kurt

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2010/10/21/juan-williams-npr-fired-truth-muslim-garb-airplane-oreilly-ellen-weiss-bush/
JUAN WILLIAMS: I Was Fired for Telling the Truth

Yesterday NPR fired me for telling the truth. The truth is that I worry when I am getting on an airplane and see people dressed in garb that identifies them first and foremost as Muslims.

This is not a bigoted statement. It is a statement of my feelings, my fears after the terrorist attacks of 9/11 by radical Muslims. In a debate with Bill O’Reilly I revealed my fears to set up the case for not making rash judgments about people of any faith. I pointed out that the Atlanta Olympic bomber --  as well as Timothy McVeigh and the people who protest against gay rights at military funerals -- are Christians but we journalists don’t identify them by their religion.
<snip>

Charles_Austin

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Re: Voter's Guide for Serious Christians
« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2010, 04:40:42 PM »
And the relevance of that to this thread?

LutherMan

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Re: Voter's Guide for Serious Christians
« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2010, 05:20:09 PM »
Kurt brought up Williams, so I added that he was fired for speaking the truth.  Williams is a political commentator, thus the relevance to a political discussion.
Note: With the initial launch post I added this disclaimer: This thread is intended to be a serious political discussion, so discuss away.
When a journalist/commentator gets muzzled by the mainstream liberal media for speaking the truth, it deserves discussion.
I too, like and respect Williams.  Hardly ever agree with him, but he is likable and passionate about his liberal views.

Charles_Austin

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Re: Voter's Guide for Serious Christians
« Reply #12 on: October 22, 2010, 09:02:27 AM »
Those of us who choose to work in the public media must be willing to set aside certain "freedoms" for the sake of our profession. When we do or say things that could compromise our integrity as journalists, our employers have the right to let us go.
And I shall now depart this particular theme, as I fully expect the usual denunciations concerning the media, journalism, objectivity, truth, fairness and the value of cabbage.

Kurt Weinelt

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Re: Voter's Guide for Serious Christians
« Reply #13 on: October 22, 2010, 09:35:40 AM »
Those of us who choose to work in the public media must be willing to set aside certain "freedoms" for the sake of our profession. When we do or say things that could compromise our integrity as journalists, our employers have the right to let us go.
And I shall now depart this particular theme, as I fully expect the usual denunciations concerning the media, journalism, objectivity, truth, fairness and the value of cabbage.
True. However in this case it was not Juan Williams who compromised his integrity as a journalist, but NPR as an institution. Since they are publicly funded by our tax money, there is a recourse to discipline NPR for their censorship from the government's side of the equation. If NPR was a privately owned enterprise, then they could only hire journalists who promoted the "company line" and I'd have no problem with that.  But as a  taxpayer and an NPR contributor, I will register my disapproval by withholding my annual pledge, and writing my congressman and senators to express my view that NPR should no longer receive tax money.

Bad timing on NPR's part that they did this during their pledge drive, and during the peak of the political "silly season." ???
Kurt
"Learning about history is an antidote to the hubris of the present, the idea that everything in OUR lives is the ultimate." David McCullough

BrotherBoris

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Re: Voter's Guide for Serious Christians
« Reply #14 on: October 22, 2010, 10:54:20 AM »
After listening to my local Roman Catholic radio station, I think some Catholics think voting is now the 8th Sacrament. If some people want to think that way, that's their business and I won't criticize them.  But according to my thinking, Christianity need not be a religion of political activism and political causes, be they conservative or liberal causes.  I am very uneasy with the entire premise of a so-called "Voter's Guide for the Serious Christian."  If one is a Christian, and has a conscience, a sense of right and wrong, a sense of ethics based on Christ's teachings in the Gospels, I don't think a so-called "Voter's Guide" is needed. 

I used to be very involved in political causes.  I found it tiresome, draining, and never saw much (if any) positive change resulting from it.  I am now content to follow Our Lord's Summary of the Law: Love God above all things and your neighbor as yourself.  I still vote for in Federal and State elections, mainly out of a sense of duty.  I really don't think my vote matters, but I am not willing to totally give up on the system just yet.  But I no longer get involved in any political activism and have removed all the bumper stickers from my car.  I am so glad that politics isn't dogma and that ultimately, Christ's Kingdom, is not of this world.