Author Topic: 9/11 - Nine Years Later  (Read 1118 times)

Eileen Smith

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9/11 - Nine Years Later
« on: September 11, 2010, 07:37:38 AM »
There were numerous Facebooks postings urging one not to forget all that occurred on 9/11.  I doubt we ever will. 

Eternal rest grant unto all who perished on that day,O Lord; may light perpetual shine upon them.
May they - with all the saints - rest in peace.

May the knowledge that they rest in the arms of our Lord grant comfort to those left behind.




J. Thomas Shelley

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Re: 9/11 - Nine Years Later
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2010, 07:57:27 AM »
I will not forget.

This  morning at 8:46 AM a recording of the Mozart Requiem will end and I will begin the liturgy of Holy Eucharist by intoning the great Litany from the Lutheran Book of Worship--the same litany which I led with my brother and sister clergy nine years before as we were gathered in worship and news reached us of the collapse of the towers and the Pentagon in flames.

On the Altar, next to the Corporal will be two laminated cards given to me by the Port Authority Police, one listing the names of their fallen, the other bearing the names of their fallen NYCPD counterparts.

For my parents and their friends, December 7 was the day on which they could always recall where they were, what they were doing, and who they were with.

I never understood, much less appreciated such remembrances until AD 2001.
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Served as a Lutheran Pastor October 31, 1989 - October 31, 2014.
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Jeremy Loesch

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Re: 9/11 - Nine Years Later
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2010, 09:51:48 AM »
If you'll allow, Tuesday morning, at 8am, I was in the home a parishioner.  Her husband was having great difficulties in his life, many of them self-inflicted.  He was nominally Christian.  The three of us had been going through some adult instruction classes, usually every Tuesday at 8:30am.  He worked for the railroad, finished up at midnight, came home to sleep and we'd meet for coffee and catechism.  And a donut. 

It was a typical class, that morning we discussed the Third Article of the Creed.  I felt it was quite good, based on the questions that the husband asked and the helpful comments of his wife.  (Faithfully catechized in central Illinois.)  What does it mean to be a member of the Church.  What is all this talk about called, gathered, enlightened, sanctified, and kept?  Communion of saints?  There's a church in heaven?  (Eventually he re-affirmed his faith, but then things went south in a very bad way.)

My car radio was always turned to 1460 The Fan, WBNS, the ESPN Radio affiliate in Columbus.  At that time of the day Mike and Mike in the Morning is on.  At least it should have been.  I couldn't understand why Dan Rather was on the radio and CBS News was speaking, when all the talk should have been football.  I drove back to church not really knowing what was going on.  At church, the daycare director told me and the TV had been rolled into my office and the staff was taking turns watching the reports.  We moved the TV out to a different area so I could do other things.  Those other things included tracking down my brother and my father.  My brother was a civilian employee for a defense contractor who primary office was in the Pentagon.  He was in the parking lot when the plane crashed into the building.  My father was still active in the ministry at that time and spent the morning tracking down his members, their families, and friends in addition to his son.  It seemed impossible to get a phone call into DC and northern VA. 

That evening my girlfriend (now wife) and I spent the evening on her couch in Marysville, OH watching the reports on TV. 

The next night we conducted a memorial service.  We invited the Presbyterian church across the street and the ELCA church from New Rome to join us.  A good contingent from all three churches came and it was a privilege to lead the service and preach the Gospel of comfort and hope that evening. 

It was strange, that's for sure.  On Saturday, probably close to fifty thousand gathered at The Shoe for a time of remembrance.  Normal activities in Ohio Stadium had been cancelled and the university opened the stadium for this event.  It was quite nice.  TBDBITL was present to play some nice songs and it was a good moment of solidarity.  Everyone that came was given a free flag. 

Perhaps about six months after 9/11, my brother informed the family that he was quitting his job and was entering the joint police academy in Fairfax VA (County police, County Sheriff, the towns of Fairfax Station and Annandale, and animal control).  His job was rather lucrative and I was surprised that he was leaving that position- excellent salary and benefits, great participation in a 401K, tickets to football games at the USNA.  But he commented that the plans being planned in the Pentagon seemed more about vengeance than justice.  The tone at the weekly morning Bible study/prayer breakfast was also not what it used to be before 9/11 or in the weeks following.  He had a lot more to say about his decision.  He is now a sworn officer in Fairfax County Police Dept and serves as a detective in the force.  Couldn't be more proud.

That day is not something I dwell on, but it certainly never leaves my mind. 

Thanks for hanging in there on this long thread.  Best wishes to all.  Deep appreciation for those who gave all and to those who serve the public good.

Jeremy
A Lutheran pastor growing into all sorts of things.

Charles_Austin

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Re: 9/11 - Nine Years Later
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2010, 10:25:07 AM »
I was in the newsroom of The Record. My wife called to say that she had the news on in the school library and that a plane just hit the World Trade Center.
We all went to the television in the newsroom and saw the second plane hit. I remember saying: "Now we know this was no accident." Oddly, we watched the television for a minute until someone said, "Look out the window," and we remembered we could see the towers from our fourth floor newsroom.
By that time, the editors were rounding us up to send us out. I was sent to Laguardia Airport, but they closed the George Washington Bridge before I could get across. I interviewed cops on the bridge, and then headed south toward Jersey City, just across from the towers. They called me back to the newsroom before I could get to Jersey City, and I began working the phones trying to get information. The next two weeks were a blur. I went to a flurry of inter-religious prayer services and funerals and began gathering tons of information on Christian-Muslim relations. I should have more memories of those days than I do, but we worked in an unusual atmosphere of astonishment, sorrow, confusion and not a little fear.
I didn't get near the site until a couple of weeks later. There was a smell, smoke and something fearsome about the air. I did not want to go back.
BTW, that iconic photo of the fireman raising the flag was taken by Tom Franklin, a photographer for The Record. Why it did not win a Pulitzer prize remains one of the mysteries of the profession.

Daniel L. Gard

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Re: 9/11 - Nine Years Later
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2010, 01:52:42 PM »
On 9/11: Where is God? He is in our tears. He is there as His own Child suffered the agonizing death of the Cross. He is there in the rubble and in the pain, never distant from His suffering, sin-wrecked creation but always in the midst of it all. He was there at the Pentagon, in New York City, in a field in Pennsylvania. “Whither shall I go from thy Spirit? Or whither shall I flee from thy presence?”

Donald_Kirchner

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Re: 9/11 - Nine Years Later
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2010, 02:07:58 PM »
Recalling Richard Eyre's comments in his Pastoral Care Under the Cross: God in the Midst of Suffering, I conclude:

Where is God? Right where He should be, hanging bloody on a cross: “A man of sorrows, and familiar with our suffering” (Isaiah 53:3). For He remains the crucified one for all time, taking away the sin of the world.

For there is our hope. For we live in the now-but-not-yet, awaiting that day when “He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away." (Rev 21:4)
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BrotherBoris

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Re: 9/11 - Nine Years Later
« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2010, 10:29:45 PM »
Remembering 9-11:

I was remembering and pondering 9-11 today and the tragic loss of life, the untold suffering etc.  I watched some youtube videos today of the event to remind me of how horrible it was. Then I thought about all this controversy about the Mosque being built so close to Ground Zero, and then I thought of this, and I decided I'd share it with the Lutheran Forum.

Did you know that a church in New York City was totally destroyed on 9-11?  It was crushed beneath the South Tower when it collapsed and TOTALLY destroyed, reduced to ashes and powder. It was an Orthodox Church, St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, and you can see a picture of it here on the website of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese, before it was destroyed:

http://www.goarch.org/news/9-11%20memorial%202010

Here's a link to an article by a man who attended that church and lives and works in New York City. They've run into some red tape and haven't even started rebuilding it, but the story, nevertheless is quite interesting.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/nick-balamaci/missing-from-ground-zero-_b_705275.html

J. Thomas Shelley

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Re: 9/11 - Nine Years Later
« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2010, 10:36:30 PM »

Did you know that a church in New York City was totally destroyed on 9-11?  It was crushed beneath the South Tower when it collapsed and TOTALLY destroyed, reduced to ashes and powder. It was an Orthodox Church, St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, and you can see a picture of it here on the website of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese, before it was destroyed:


Yes, I did know--but until recently I did not realize that relics of St. Nicholas and St. Sava were dispersed amidst the rubble and cloud.

That ground has been hallowed by many saints, ancient and modern.
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BrotherBoris

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Re: 9/11 - Nine Years Later
« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2010, 10:58:38 PM »
This church has a website, including a unique picture of the church with the Twin Towers burning behind it. The photo was taken by a man named Eric O'Donnell who snapped the picture moments before the towers collapse.  The website has some interesting pictures of the interior of the church and the parish's on-going life since the building was destroyed. 

http://www.stnicholasnyc.com/

aberaussie

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Re: 9/11 - Nine Years Later
« Reply #9 on: September 11, 2010, 11:31:09 PM »
I have read some comments about this church having trouble getting permission to rebuild.  What's the real story on that?
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BrotherBoris

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Re: 9/11 - Nine Years Later
« Reply #10 on: September 12, 2010, 07:58:18 AM »
I have read some comments about this church having trouble getting permission to rebuild.  What's the real story on that?


This is the best explanation I can find for you:  http://www.goarch.org/news/rebuildsaintnicholaschurch

I really don't understand a lot of the details. I do know that both sides seem to be talking past one another.  The Port Authority wants the church to move and rebuild at another location because they want to build an underground parking garage on the original site of St. Nicholas Church at 135 Cedar Street.  If they do that, it will really complicate matters for the rebuilding of St. Nicholas on that site because they won't be able to dig into the ground and give the church the proper foundation that it needs.  The Port Authority strongly suggested that St. Nicholas relocate to a parcel of land at the corner of Liberty and Greenwich streets in New York City, not very far away from the original location.  The Port Authority was willing to pay the parish of St. Nicholas $20 million in exchange for moving to the new location.  St. Nicholas took the offer seriously and had an architect draw up plans for a proposed church on the new site.  The plans were then submitted to the Port Authority.  The Port Authority refused to approve the architectural plans, specifically telling St. Nicholas that the church building could not have a dome and that it was too tall. After the plans were drawn up the Port Authority put a height restriction on the Orthodox Church, telling St. Nicholas that the dome of the church could not be any taller than the World Trade Center Memorial.  At that point, the talks started to really break down.  Perhaps you might have to be Orthodox to truly understand the significance of the dome, but its very important in traditional Orthodox architecture. The dome of an Orthodox Church represents heaven. It is the place where the Icon of Christ as the Pantokrator (Almighty) is located.  It shows Christ looking down from heaven on His Church.  All traditional Orthodox churches built in the Byzantine style have such an icon inside the dome. Anyway, when the plan was not approved by the Port Authority, the people of St. Nicholas asked to see the plans for the proposed parking garage at the original location of their church at 135 Cedar Street.  (My guess, and I could be wrong, is that they weren't satisfied with the proposal to move and wanted to see what they could do if they stayed at their original location.)  The Port Authority refused to show St. Nicholas parish the architectural plans for the proposed parking garage and began to ignore them.  News reporters then contacted the Port Authority about the issue. The Port Authority told the reporters that the deal with St. Nicholas is now off.  The Port Authority said that St. Nicholas can do whatever it wants with the original property, but that the deal to relocate the church to the corner of Liberty and Greenwich is over.  The reporters then informed the church authorities about the Port Authority's reply. The church said that was news to them and that they had not heard that before. The Port Authority had not informed them of anything.  Last I heard the Port Authority has begun excavation at St. Nicholas' original location at 135 Cedar Street.  Since St. Nicholas still owns this property and due to the fact that they have not given the Port Authority permission to excavate, such an excavation is illegal.  Nevertheless, the Port Authority is proceeding with the excavation. That is about where it stands now.  I don't know how this will be resolved.