Author Topic: Giving Polygamy a Chance  (Read 35843 times)

Steven Tibbetts

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Re: Giving Polygamy a Chance
« Reply #240 on: January 29, 2010, 03:41:18 PM »
There is no contrast. There is an intentional omission.


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Brian Stoffregen

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Re: Giving Polygamy a Chance
« Reply #241 on: January 29, 2010, 03:48:12 PM »
God loves the world. God sent Jesus to die for the world.

God, in Jesus Christ, loves and accepts every person in the world.

Steven can speak for himself, but if you look at the two statements above, I think you would see the same contrast he is talking about.  The first half of each statement is the same: God loves the world.  The second part is not.  God "accepts every person in the world" might mean that God accepts us as we are.  Or it could mean that through the death of Jesus, God makes us acceptable and bestow on us a favor we do not deserve.  Judging from the context, it would assume you mean the latter.

It could also mean that God accepts us as we are -- and God, through the Holy Spirit, kills the old and raises up a new person (every day).
"The church had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

DCharlton

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Re: Giving Polygamy a Chance
« Reply #242 on: January 29, 2010, 06:17:11 PM »
God loves the world. God sent Jesus to die for the world.

God, in Jesus Christ, loves and accepts every person in the world.

Steven can speak for himself, but if you look at the two statements above, I think you would see the same contrast he is talking about.  The first half of each statement is the same: God loves the world.  The second part is not.  God "accepts every person in the world" might mean that God accepts us as we are.  Or it could mean that through the death of Jesus, God makes us acceptable and bestow on us a favor we do not deserve.  Judging from the context, it would assume you mean the latter.

It could also mean that God accepts us as we are -- and God, through the Holy Spirit, kills the old and raises up a new person (every day).

Do you meand that God both declares us righteousness and makes (is making, will make) us righteous?  If so, I agree with you.  Would you also agree that a problem arises when we either believe 1)that God is content to leave us as we are; or 2) that Christ' righteousness is not ours until we have become righteous on our own.        
« Last Edit: January 29, 2010, 06:20:00 PM by DCharlton »
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Brian Stoffregen

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Re: Giving Polygamy a Chance
« Reply #243 on: January 29, 2010, 06:41:23 PM »
Do you meand that God both declares us righteousness and makes (is making, will make) us righteous?  If so, I agree with you.  Would you also agree that a problem arises when we either believe 1)that God is content to leave us as we are; or 2) that Christ' righteousness is not ours until we have become righteous on our own.

Yes, there is a now and not yet to our righteousness. At the same time, I'm hesitant to say that God is in the process of making us more and more righteous. Throughout our lives we are 100% sinner and 100% righteous. We never escape from that dual nature. At the same time, we can improve in our "civil righteousness." That is, better willing and able to show love towards neighbors (and enemies). Better willing and able to stand up against injustice, etc. Perhaps to phrase it differently, we can act more and more like the perfectly righteous person that God says that we are in his sight. "Become what you are!"
"The church had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]