Author Topic: Once again, in loco parentis  (Read 22631 times)

peter_speckhard

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Re: Once again, in loco parentis
« Reply #480 on: August 30, 2022, 11:10:34 PM »
Of the 21 years that I spent in formal classroom education (plus a year of v8carage) starting when I was 5 and ending with two Masters when I left the halls of academe when I was 28, I had spent 15 years in LCMS schools and 6 in state run schools. Along the way there were advantages for me from the time I spent in LCMS schools and state schools, and things I missed out on during the years I spent cloistered in Mother MO and the years spent in the wilds of public education. Each had its advantages and deficits.
Thatís the logic by which Canada remove native children from their homes and sent them to boarding schools and/or to be adopted. They needed schools to unify their culture. Schools do that properly with the parents consent, not despite the parentsí objections.

Brian Stoffregen

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Re: Once again, in loco parentis
« Reply #481 on: August 30, 2022, 11:49:38 PM »
Of the 21 years that I spent in formal classroom education (plus a year of v8carage) starting when I was 5 and ending with two Masters when I left the halls of academe when I was 28, I had spent 15 years in LCMS schools and 6 in state run schools. Along the way there were advantages for me from the time I spent in LCMS schools and state schools, and things I missed out on during the years I spent cloistered in Mother MO and the years spent in the wilds of public education. Each had its advantages and deficits.
Thatís the logic by which Canada remove native children from their homes and sent them to boarding schools and/or to be adopted. They needed schools to unify their culture. Schools do that properly with the parents consent, not despite the parentsí objections.


So, you're changing your tune about creating a unifying American culture. We are a nation of many cultures and should remain that way - and respect each other's cultures.
"The church Ö had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

peter_speckhard

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Re: Once again, in loco parentis
« Reply #482 on: August 31, 2022, 12:29:01 AM »
Of the 21 years that I spent in formal classroom education (plus a year of v8carage) starting when I was 5 and ending with two Masters when I left the halls of academe when I was 28, I had spent 15 years in LCMS schools and 6 in state run schools. Along the way there were advantages for me from the time I spent in LCMS schools and state schools, and things I missed out on during the years I spent cloistered in Mother MO and the years spent in the wilds of public education. Each had its advantages and deficits.
Thatís the logic by which Canada remove native children from their homes and sent them to boarding schools and/or to be adopted. They needed schools to unify their culture. Schools do that properly with the parents consent, not despite the parentsí objections.


So, you're changing your tune about creating a unifying American culture. We are a nation of many cultures and should remain that way - and respect each other's cultures.
No. I'm saying that schools can have a unifying affect where such unity is sought by a large majority of parents and lamenting that we do not have that. Given that situation, though, I'm for parents choosing schools that will pass along their values to their children rather than undermine those values. Whether a culture is unified or not, education remain in loco parentis.

Dan Fienen

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Re: Once again, in loco parentis
« Reply #483 on: August 31, 2022, 10:17:23 AM »
Changing the subject, consider the kerfuffle over the hateful, transphobic comment by country music star Brittany Aldean in a caption to a video she shared of her putting on makeup: "I's really like to thank my parents for not changing my gender when I went through my tomboy phase. I love this girly life."  https://www.newsweek.com/brittany-aldean-instagram-followers-rise-transphobia-comments-1738431


This is just the last of a whole series of shamings of celebrities for daring to question the orthodoxy of transgenderism that pre-pubescent children can decide that they are the wrong gender and should undergo hormone therapy and surgery to change their sex. How have we gotten to this place where a girl going through a "tomboy phase" could be rushed into irreversible medical intervention that may or very well may not help her live a happy well-adjusted life? Even more, how have we gotten to this place where this gender changing can be undertaken with the complicity of public schools without the consent or even the knowledge (in at least the first stages) of the child's parents?

Gender dysphoria is such a slippery concept. Can there be instances where individual's sense of self is disturbed to the extent that gender reassignment is the best or only reasonable treatment for their disfunctioning? God did not create us for that to be the case, but then much changed in the fall after creation. People malfunction in many, many different ways, sometimes necessitating extensive medical intervention. When gender transition seems to be the best recourse, those people need to be treated with respect and sympathy. But it has now become a fad. It has almost reached the state where being cis gendered is the disorder. It is especially questionable when there is a rush to apply these treatments to children.

Has there actually been enough objective scientific studies to determine the long-term effects of these treatments and their benefits or necessity? The history of psychology is littered with faddish treatments and diagnoses that have turned out to be far less helpful and far more harmful than practitioners thought. Lobotomy and recovered memory therapy were both popular in their day and now widely rejected. Perhaps the same will one day been seen about childhood gender reassignment treatment.




   



Pr. Daniel Fienen
LCMS

Brian Stoffregen

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Re: Once again, in loco parentis
« Reply #484 on: August 31, 2022, 12:37:23 PM »
Of the 21 years that I spent in formal classroom education (plus a year of v8carage) starting when I was 5 and ending with two Masters when I left the halls of academe when I was 28, I had spent 15 years in LCMS schools and 6 in state run schools. Along the way there were advantages for me from the time I spent in LCMS schools and state schools, and things I missed out on during the years I spent cloistered in Mother MO and the years spent in the wilds of public education. Each had its advantages and deficits.
Thatís the logic by which Canada remove native children from their homes and sent them to boarding schools and/or to be adopted. They needed schools to unify their culture. Schools do that properly with the parents consent, not despite the parentsí objections.


So, you're changing your tune about creating a unifying American culture. We are a nation of many cultures and should remain that way - and respect each other's cultures.
No. I'm saying that schools can have a unifying affect where such unity is sought by a large majority of parents and lamenting that we do not have that. Given that situation, though, I'm for parents choosing schools that will pass along their values to their children rather than undermine those values. Whether a culture is unified or not, education remain in loco parentis.


Certainly schools have a unifying affect - as well as a dividing affect. However, I thought that you were lamenting the loss of a national unifying culture. What we have is much like the "unity" among Christians: many groups of believers who all think that they have it right and all the others have some faults in their theology and practices.


There's also a general truth that the more a group is unified, the greater the boundary between them and outsiders.
"The church Ö had made us like ill-taught piano students; we play our songs, but we never really hear them, because our main concern is not to make music, but but to avoid some flub that will get us in dutch." [Robert Capon, _Between Noon and Three_, p. 148]

peter_speckhard

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Re: Once again, in loco parentis
« Reply #485 on: September 01, 2022, 08:58:47 PM »
https://washingtonstand.com/news/thats-how-you-get-away-with-it-liberal-principal-admits-discriminating-against-religious-teachers

This is why some people hate Project Veritas; they need the address hominem to have any argument at all.