Author Topic: The Lutheran Study Bible  (Read 21865 times)

bluejay

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #195 on: October 25, 2011, 12:09:26 PM »
I plan to purchase a study Bible as a gift for a 45 year old male and am looking at the new Lutheran Study Bible (CPH). Question: I like the thumb index and also like leather. But am wondering if the larger print might be better (no thumb index?). Sometimes the paper gets too thin and the print bleeds through, making reading difficult. Also have heard about a new Crossway study Bible but don't know anything about it. I had the AF Bible myself and gave it away after reading some of the notes; wouldn't want to make that mistake for a gift.

Also, do you know if any Bible covers will fit the large print version if I purchase hardcover?

Thanks for your help.


Timotheus Verinus

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #196 on: October 25, 2011, 01:09:46 PM »
I plan to purchase a study Bible as a gift for a 45 year old male and am looking at the new Lutheran Study Bible (CPH). Question: I like the thumb index and also like leather. But am wondering if the larger print might be better (no thumb index?). Sometimes the paper gets too thin and the print bleeds through, making reading difficult. Also have heard about a new Crossway study Bible but don't know anything about it. I had the AF Bible myself and gave it away after reading some of the notes; wouldn't want to make that mistake for a gift.

Also, do you know if any Bible covers will fit the large print version if I purchase hardcover?

Thanks for your help.

I have the Large print TLSB from CPH in the soft leather cover and it works good for me ... as a study bible, where I can don my granny glasses for the footnotes. The pages are not too thin, nor the binding too loose.

As to other study bibles. I disagree with some study notes in TLSB, as likely well seen in this forum, BUT it is a solid foundation, with good hermeneutic, and references. The only complaint I have is when occasionally the editors cannot resist stating a personal opinion in the notes without foundation. Usually I agree with their opinions, but the practice is a reach too far. Fortunately that is rare and focused on a few "hot buttons" in the LCMS. They are also easily identified when reading. The point I would make is this. I think it is by far the most faithful of study notes among any of the other efforts I have seen and used. The Crossway notes do not compare well in this regard, and they are different. I recommend you start at the CPH notes and go from there with different understandings you might have. That is a solid place to stand. Just Red line the places you might cry "Not!!!" They will be very very few, in my personal use and experience. You can rely on the scholarship behind the notes, and take the time to  bring serious study and reasons, in those few cases, as a basis to disagree.

TV
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Steven Tibbetts

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #197 on: October 25, 2011, 07:26:06 PM »
I'm 52 and, with my bifocals, can read just about anything.  Nevertheless for me, the notes in the regular edition can be a challenge to see well.  The larger-print edition I see just fine.  Several parishioners also have CPH's The Lutheran Study Bible in the larger print edition.  That is not, however, "large print," and some of the older ones need still need magnification. 

When we purchased them at first publication, CPH was offering covers for the larger print edition.

OTOH, the larger print edition is one hefty book.  Once a month I lead a chapel service inthe community room at a local senior living community.  They have no lectern or podium, but one of those height-adjustable music stands where the rack stays up pneumatically.  I usually put both a Bible and hymnal on it with no problem.  Put TLSB on it by itself, and then watched the rack sink down to its lowest position.

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LutherMan

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #198 on: October 25, 2011, 08:24:25 PM »
I plan to purchase a study Bible as a gift for a 45 year old male and am looking at the new Lutheran Study Bible (CPH).
I carry my larger print in a backpack and it has markedly improved my posture.  It is a very heavy book...

Scott6

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #199 on: October 25, 2011, 09:03:32 PM »
Put TLSB on it by itself, and then watched the rack sink down to its lowest position.

You, too?

pr dtp

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #200 on: October 25, 2011, 10:48:13 PM »
Buy the cheapest kindle and buy the kindle edition.

This will allow you to adjust the font size, save money, and your back significant stress.

(and it would be in the range of the leather bound editions..)
« Last Edit: October 26, 2011, 03:00:51 PM by justified and sinner »

EarlOfOrmond

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #201 on: October 31, 2011, 04:45:26 PM »
Put TLSB on it by itself, and then watched the rack sink down to its lowest position.

That's some pretty heavy reading.

Charles_Austin

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #202 on: October 31, 2011, 08:20:54 PM »
Why does Concordia's Lutheran Study Bible cost the same as a Kindle e-book as it does in a hardcover? Kindle books are supposed to be much cheaper than the printed version.
And the Augsburg-Fortress printed version is $10 cheaper. BUt I don't see a Kindle edition.
« Last Edit: October 31, 2011, 08:24:30 PM by Charles_Austin »

Kurt Weinelt

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible incompatible with Kindle Paperwhite
« Reply #203 on: January 20, 2013, 10:20:31 PM »
Has anybody else out there in th Lutheran cyber-universe tried to download the Lutheran Study Bible onto a Kindle Paperwhite?

We bought my mom a Kindle Paperwhite because her Bible was too big for her to carry to Bible class along with her purse and cane. We bought the Kindle Paperwhite because it was the best reader out there for her to read, and she didn't need (or want) all the complexity of a Kindle Fire. We activated it yesterday, and made the Lutheran Study Bible our first purchase. She was really looking forward to it, but when we downloaded the book there was a glaring problem...no table of contents. The only way to go from the Forward to any book of the Bible was page-by-page. We looked on the user reviews on Amazon, and several other customers had the same problem. So we returned the book for a refund.

Anybody encountered this problem, and is there a fix?
"Learning about history is an antidote to the hubris of the present, the idea that everything in OUR lives is the ultimate." David McCullough

Dan Fienen

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #204 on: January 20, 2013, 11:08:10 PM »
I purchased the Lutheran Study Bbible   for Kindle on my Samsung 7inch tablet.  Finding thd table of contnts was a challenge, but I found by using the goto feature that listed the TOC. 

You might try customer service at Amazon (or as a second option CPH,  but I'm guessing they let Amazon handle kindle questions).

In some ways the paper edition is easier to use, but the kindle is sure lighter to hold and schlep around.


Dan
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LutherMan

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #205 on: January 21, 2013, 03:50:58 AM »
My TLSB is the heaviest book I own, even heavier than my Merriam Webster dictionary...

Dave Likeness

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #206 on: January 21, 2013, 09:39:46 AM »
The Lutheran Study Bible in the Large Print
Hard Back edition weighs 5 pounds. For some
pastors in the LCMS the only exercise they get
is carrying this tome. CPH is to be applauded
for considering the physical fitness of our clergy
in the production of this heavy book.

Johan Bergfest

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #207 on: January 21, 2013, 09:55:41 AM »
My TLSB is the heaviest book I own, even heavier than my Merriam Webster dictionary...

The heaviest book in my library is probably The Concordia Self-Study Commentary.  It is good exercise to carry it and even better exercise to read it - especially Franzmann's notes on the New Testament.

Dave Likeness

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #208 on: January 21, 2013, 10:12:08 AM »
Dr. Martin Franzmann  was probably the best
New Testament scholar of the LCMS in the
last half of the 20th century.  He wrote two
commentaries that are priceless: Romans
and Revelation.  He wrote a devotional
commentary on Matthew.  His New Testament
Introduction is still relevant in the 21st century.

Kurt Weinelt

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #209 on: January 21, 2013, 10:13:02 AM »
I purchased the Lutheran Study Bbible   for Kindle on my Samsung 7inch tablet.  Finding thd table of contnts was a challenge, but I found by using the goto feature that listed the TOC. 

You might try customer service at Amazon (or as a second option CPH,  but I'm guessing they let Amazon handle kindle questions).

In some ways the paper edition is easier to use, but the kindle is sure lighter to hold and schlep around.

Dan
The "go to" feature does not have the table of contents in the menu. The Bible loaded on our earlier Kindle version does have this function.

I contacted Concordia by email yesterday (and got a personal---not a computer-generated--- reply two minutes later!), and they were unaware of the issue until now. I guess we'll find out what's going on soon. The paper copy is a non-starter since the whole point of buying the Kindle Paperwhite was to eliminate her having to carry books around.
"Learning about history is an antidote to the hubris of the present, the idea that everything in OUR lives is the ultimate." David McCullough