Author Topic: The Lutheran Study Bible  (Read 21782 times)

MSchimmel

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #135 on: October 15, 2009, 11:56:45 AM »
I received mine two days ago and have been spending a lot of time with it.

Based on some early reviews I switched my order to the larger print version with the black leather binding - and for a bible to spend a lot of time with I'm very glad I got the larger print!  It is very readable - but it is hardly what I think of when I think of LARGE print books.  I estimate that the text is about 10pt and the notes are about 8pt.

It is however, a quite large book and not so readily carried around - so I think I may actually buy one of the standard versions to have with me even if I use the big one more in regular study and prayer.

I'm waiting for the promotional pack to arrive at the church so I can put together a group buy for members of the congregation.  We are currently doing the Essential 100 Challenge and will finish that up about Thanksgiving - I'd like to introduce this as the next way to get folks digging into the Word on a regular basis.

LCMS87

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #136 on: October 15, 2009, 12:37:59 PM »
[McCain mode on]

Just a note for those planning a "big buy."  The pre-publication price, $20.00 savings on regular and bonded leather editions and $25.00 savings on genuine leather editions, ends 31 October.  Those savings are reduced by $5.00 thereafter.  (I can't tell for certain, but it doesn't look like CPH will begin to charge list price until at least after Christmas.)

Through 24 December CPH is also offering free shipping on orders over $75.00, so it doesn't take more that two or three TLSB's to take advantage of that offer.

Since there's no economic benefit to accumulating a big order, it might be worth inviting orders right away and then having a second deadline with the smaller discount later on.  (From my parish experience, we had far more orders for the thumb indexed than the regular edition, and had about the same number of orders for the larger print as for the thumb-indexed edition.)

One more thing.  The larger print edition has been selling much more quickly than anticipated.  The standard binding of the larger print edition sold out last week.  More are being printed and are expected 11 December.

[McCain mode off]

ghp

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #137 on: October 15, 2009, 02:28:06 PM »
I received mine two days ago and have been spending a lot of time with it.

Based on some early reviews I switched my order to the larger print version with the black leather binding - and for a bible to spend a lot of time with I'm very glad I got the larger print!  It is very readable - but it is hardly what I think of when I think of LARGE print books.  I estimate that the text is about 10pt and the notes are about 8pt.


The text in the larger print TLSB is 10.65pt. By comparison, the regular print version has 9pt type.

For me, the extra weight & size/bulk was easily worth it to get the bigger type and (especially) the better/thicker paper.


EarlOfOrmond

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #138 on: October 15, 2009, 02:34:21 PM »
I just got mine today.

My first thought is "Wow."

Pilgrim

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #139 on: October 15, 2009, 03:40:27 PM »
Question: Does The Lutheran Study Bible (CPH), include or have an edition that includes the Apocrypha?

Pr. Tim Christ
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Scott6

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #140 on: October 15, 2009, 03:45:40 PM »
Question: Does The Lutheran Study Bible (CPH), include or have an edition that includes the Apocrypha?

Pr. Tim Christ

From the FAQ:

Does The Lutheran Study Bible include the Apocrypha?
No, it does not, though it does contain an explanation of the history between the two Testaments and an explanation of the books that were written during this time and traditionally included in Lutheran Bibles since the first edition of Luther’s Bible in 1534, continuing up the time that The Missouri Synod moved from German to English, at which time, the Apocrypha was no longer included. We did not feel it was wise to try to reintroduce these books to the English speaking Lutheran Church by including them in The Lutheran Study Bible since the vast majority of Lutherans are entirely unfamiliar with them. Rather, we are considering producing a separate volume detailing what these books are, offering more extensive history and background for them and including the books themselves. This will be a better way to introduce Lutherans to the heritage of including these books, which Luther said in his Bible that thought they are not canonical like the other books of the Bible, they are certainly good for reading.


http://www.cph.org/cphstore/pages/resources/tlsb/faqs.asp

James Thomas Sharp

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #141 on: October 15, 2009, 04:14:33 PM »
Can someone who owns the Bible please explain to me what the Great "The" Lutheran Study Bible Twitter/Facebook Dustup of '09 is about?  Supposedly the note on Exodus 7:17 is chock full o' heresy?
« Last Edit: October 15, 2009, 04:16:33 PM by James Thomas Sharp »
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Scott6

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #142 on: October 15, 2009, 04:21:36 PM »
Can someone who owns the Bible please explain to me what the Great "The" Lutheran Study Bible Twitter/Facebook Dustup of '09 is about?  Supposedly the note on Exodus 7:17 is chock full o' heresy?

Wasn't aware of the twittering debate, but the note compares the Nile being turned into blood with Joel 2:31 where the moon is turned into blood.  I'm guessing it uses this to indicate that biblical language sometimes is figural and not literal and then says: "...thus it was not a chemical change into real blood, but a change in appearance, possibly because of red algae."

So there you go.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2009, 08:46:09 AM by Scott Yakimow »

Michael Slusser

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #143 on: October 15, 2009, 04:25:37 PM »
. . . traditionally included in Lutheran Bibles since the first edition of Lutherís Bible in 1534, continuing up the time that The Missouri Synod moved from German to English, at which time, the Apocrypha was no longer included. We did not feel it was wise to try to reintroduce these books to the English speaking Lutheran Church by including them in The Lutheran Study Bible since the vast majority of Lutherans are entirely unfamiliar with them. http://www.cph.org/cphstore/pages/resources/tlsb/faqs.asp

Thanks, Scott. . . . whereas Chronicles, Nahum, and Proverbs are very familiar to all  :D  It's a pity; this would have been a good opportunity to reconnect with Lutheran tradition. It would also have facilitated conversation with the RC and Orthodox churches who never moved from German to English and consequently never "lost" them  ;D

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Michael
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Michael Slusser

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #144 on: October 15, 2009, 04:31:48 PM »
Can someone who owns the Bible please explain to me what the Great "The" Lutheran Study Bible Twitter/Facebook Dustup of '09 is about?  Supposedly the note on Exodus 7:17 is chock full o' heresy?

Wasn't aware of the twittering debate, but the note compares the Nile being turned into blood with Joel 2:31 where the moon is turned into blood.  I'm guessing it uses this to indicate that biblical language sometimes is figurally and not literally and then says: "...thus it was not a chemical change into real blood, but a change in appearance, possibly because of red algae."

So there you go.

Do they say anything about Exod. 7:22 "But the magicians of Egypt did the same by their secret arts"? See also 8:7. Only in 8:18 do Moses and Aaron achieve a little separation from their adversaries. Curious!

Peace,
Michael
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Scott6

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #145 on: October 15, 2009, 04:36:52 PM »
Can someone who owns the Bible please explain to me what the Great "The" Lutheran Study Bible Twitter/Facebook Dustup of '09 is about?  Supposedly the note on Exodus 7:17 is chock full o' heresy?

Wasn't aware of the twittering debate, but the note compares the Nile being turned into blood with Joel 2:31 where the moon is turned into blood.  I'm guessing it uses this to indicate that biblical language sometimes is figurally and not literally and then says: "...thus it was not a chemical change into real blood, but a change in appearance, possibly because of red algae."

So there you go.

Do they say anything about Exod. 7:22 "But the magicians of Egypt did the same by their secret arts"? See also 8:7. Only in 8:18 do Moses and Aaron achieve a little separation from their adversaries. Curious!

Peace,
Michael

Well, it references the note to vs. 11 which points out that the magicians used incantations and sleight of hand.  The note for 7:22 also indicates that they plied their arts on water that had remained unaffected, and it references vs. 24 for such water.

The note to 8:18 reads: "The Egyptian magicians displayed the impotence of their secret arts next to the creative power of the true God.  See note, 7:11."

In its summary of 8:16-19, it says: "The plague of gnats is more intense than the previous plagues, and the magicians concede that there is a God greater than the ones they serve.  God's judgment increases in magnitude as this plague drives Pharaoh and his magicians toward despair."  It continues, but that's enough for now.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2009, 04:45:51 PM by Scott Yakimow »

Michael Slusser

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #146 on: October 15, 2009, 04:47:50 PM »
Well, it references the note to vs. 11 which points out that the magicians used incantations and sleight of hand.  The note for 7:22 also indicates that they plied their arts on water that had remained unaffected, and it references vs. 24 for such water.

The note to 8:18 reads: "The Egyptian magicians displayed the impotence of their secret arts next to the creative power of the true God.  See note, 7:11."

In its summary of 8:16-19, it says: "The plague of gnats is more intense than the previous plagues, and the magicians concede that there is a God greater than the ones they serve.  God's judgment increases in magnitude as this plague drives Pharaoh and his magicians toward despair."  It continues, but that's enough for now.

Thanks, Scott. I've always enjoyed the way that, for a while there, Moses and Aaron are tied neck-and-neck (or rod-and-rod) with the magicians. It seems a good example of the way in which the acts of God don't always outshine the works of men, even if we know which are which.

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Michael
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Steven Tibbetts

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #147 on: October 15, 2009, 05:35:00 PM »

Since there's no economic benefit to accumulating a big order, it might be worth inviting orders right away and then having a second deadline with the smaller discount later on. 


The young woman on the CPH phone yesterday encouraged me to wait to do our order closer to the Oct. 31 date.  Of the 18 we've signed up for so far (with an average attendance of 43), only one is the "regular" print.

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EarlOfOrmond

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #148 on: October 15, 2009, 06:43:00 PM »
Well, it references the note to vs. 11 which points out that the magicians used incantations and sleight of hand.  The note for 7:22 also indicates that they plied their arts on water that had remained unaffected, and it references vs. 24 for such water.

The note to 8:18 reads: "The Egyptian magicians displayed the impotence of their secret arts next to the creative power of the true God.  See note, 7:11."

In its summary of 8:16-19, it says: "The plague of gnats is more intense than the previous plagues, and the magicians concede that there is a God greater than the ones they serve.  God's judgment increases in magnitude as this plague drives Pharaoh and his magicians toward despair."  It continues, but that's enough for now.

Thanks, Scott. I've always enjoyed the way that, for a while there, Moses and Aaron are tied neck-and-neck (or rod-and-rod) with the magicians. It seems a good example of the way in which the acts of God don't always outshine the works of men, even if we know which are which.

Peace,
Michael

As someone who is occasionally afflicted with furunculosis, when I think of the plague of boils, it's hard for me to imagine anything worse.

LCMS87

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #149 on: October 15, 2009, 08:28:20 PM »

Since there's no economic benefit to accumulating a big order, it might be worth inviting orders right away and then having a second deadline with the smaller discount later on.  


The young woman on the CPH phone yesterday encouraged me to wait to do our order closer to the Oct. 31 date.  Of the 18 we've signed up for so far (with an average attendance of 43), only one is the "regular" print.

PAx, Steven+

By right away I meant before the 31st to take advantage of the best prices.  That means announcements this Sunday and next, which is pretty quick if it wasn't already in the plans.  

Our second deadline for the congregation is the 25th, the order will go in sometime that week.  (So far we've had 21 orders all told, and only one family bought more than one.  I'm very pleased with the response, and the folks who've been using the Bible are uniformly appreciative of it.)

« Last Edit: October 15, 2009, 08:33:54 PM by LCMS87 »