Author Topic: The Lutheran Study Bible  (Read 21148 times)

Matt Staneck

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #120 on: September 18, 2009, 10:18:50 AM »
First day of orientation President Meyer urged us to get off of this 70-acre plus gothic campus and to get to know the people and the area of St. Louis.  I took that as meaning, "Get out of the Lutheran ghetto with this stuff."  Develop relationships, be a friend to people, you know "ministry of presence" stuff.  Speaking of ministry of presence, I got assigned to do my institutional module at Laclede's Grove.  Hanging out with seniors, getting to know them, visiting with them, being a presence.  I was blessed to get a taste of that this summer and look forward to more of that in the weeks to come.

M. Staneck
Matt Staneck, Pastor
St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church
Queens, NY

Weedon

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #121 on: September 18, 2009, 12:48:53 PM »
Be sure to look up Dr. Nagel and give him my kindest regards, Matt!

Weedon

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #122 on: September 18, 2009, 12:51:21 PM »
Jim,

Amen!  I really think we need to get word out on the book that is the topic of this thread.  I mean, wow.  Just wow.  Today I did the extra reading Treasury suggests from Haggai and read through the whole set - the intros, the notes.  Those Law/Gospel notes that pull us into prayer all over the place.  They are one of my favorite features.  What a treasury this book is and what a blessing it will be to many!

jebutler

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #123 on: September 18, 2009, 01:06:08 PM »
Jim,

Amen!  I really think we need to get word out on the book that is the topic of this thread.  I mean, wow.  Just wow.  Today I did the extra reading Treasury suggests from Haggai and read through the whole set - the intros, the notes.  Those Law/Gospel notes that pull us into prayer all over the place.  They are one of my favorite features.  What a treasury this book is and what a blessing it will be to many!

I was at the International Center for District Secretaries' meeting (saw your secretary, my old friend Tony Troup while I was there) and picked up my copy. I also got copies for our congregational president and chairman of our elders. I would have gotten more, but dang! is that book ever heavy!! I haven't had much time to look through it but I will.

You mentioned the Treasury. I confess (gladly!) that I misjudged it and that I am warming up to it. One thing that I found to be very helpful was finding a choir singing the canticles and liturgy on the Synod's website. That has added to my use of the book immensely; without it the music is just so much chicken scratchings to me.

I'd still like to see more quotes from other sources and less from the confessions (which I read yearly anyway) and I wish we had a different translation of the Bible, but those are quibbles. Overall, I begin to see in it what you see in it.
These are things that we can discuss among learned and reasonable people, or even among ourselves. (Luther, SA III, paraphrased).

LCMS87

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #124 on: September 18, 2009, 03:05:12 PM »
You mentioned the Treasury. I confess (gladly!) that I misjudged it and that I am warming up to it. One thing that I found to be very helpful was finding a choir singing the canticles and liturgy on the Synod's website. That has added to my use of the book immensely; without it the music is just so much chicken scratchings to me.

Pr. Butler,

Somewhat off topic--I just received my TLSB on Wednesday and haven't had much chance to explore it yet--but I am interested in the recordings you mention.  I poked around the LCMS website a bit and didn't locate them.  Can you proved a link or some directions. 

I have a few members who expressed an interest in such recordings recently but hadn't been able to provide much help yet.

Thanks

LCMS87

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #125 on: September 18, 2009, 03:07:21 PM »
Duh, another look and I believe these are probably what you were referring to. 

http://www.lcms.org/pages/internal.asp?NavID=15581

Thanks for letting me know there was something to look for!

Rik

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #126 on: September 19, 2009, 03:13:13 AM »
 ;D ::) ;D I'm just glad that (according to The Lutheran Study Bible [TLSB]) there was no known mauve-colored fruit in the G.arden of Eden.  ;D ::) ;D

Rik

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #127 on: September 19, 2009, 03:16:59 AM »
Just a Question:
     For those who used the Concordia Self-Study Bible for some years,
how does the concordance in TLSB (CPH) compare with that of the CSSB?

Which is more complete?

Weedon

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #128 on: September 19, 2009, 10:20:13 AM »
Jim,

I'm so glad to hear your re-evaluation of Treasury.  I truly couldn't imagine doing without it anymore.  And I too wish that more of the writings had been from other sources than the Symbols.  But then again, like today, the writing from the Symbol all by itself was quite refreshing. 

Pax!

Jeremy Loesch

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #129 on: September 20, 2009, 07:48:25 AM »
Just thought I would chime in about Treasury of Daily Prayer...  (This isn't thread drift- Lutheran Service Book, Concordia: The Lutheran Confessions, TDP, TLSB are all awesome and I love them.)

There are times when I wish the writings were more from the Church Fathers and less from the Symbols, but as someone who spent more time in church history and exegetical theology, reading the Symbols is a great thing.  It's like a refresher course.  And following the additional readings is a great thing to do at lunch- eat a little lighter and spend time in the Confessions- a healthy diet. 

So basically, I agree with Will.

TDP has been great and it gives me something to continuously send to my members electronically.  I send them messages about what I found in TDP.

Jeremy
A Lutheran pastor growing into all sorts of things.

Edward Engelbrecht

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #130 on: September 21, 2009, 08:36:31 AM »
On the topic of colors in Eden, it occures to me that Cranach painted his "Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden" in 1530, well into the Reformation. In the course of the painting, he assigned colors to the fruit, based on the colors of know fruit. I've never seen any evidence that this created a stir among theologians of the day. Apparently, it all seemed quite reasonable to do, as thousands of painters have done over the centuries.

Rik

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #131 on: September 21, 2009, 02:13:02 PM »
On the topic of colors in Eden, it occures to me that Cranach painted his "Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden" in 1530, well into the Reformation. In the course of the painting, he assigned colors to the fruit, based on the colors of know fruit. I've never seen any evidence that this created a stir among theologians of the day. Apparently, it all seemed quite reasonable to do, as thousands of painters have done over the centuries.

My point was merely, "why say more than the Scriptures say?"  It is not meant to cause a stir at all.  Let us try to learn Scripture as best we can.  When a book is directed toward adults, not children, where's the need to comment on something that's mere speculation? 

And there is no benefit I know of to spread the idea that the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil was an apple, so why must some imply that such was the case--artists can probably choose from many fruit when depicting this account, even recognizing that the fruit back then might not have looked identical to modern varieties of fruit.

There are many common misquotes people assign to the Holy Scriptures.  One such example is that "Money is the root of all evil."  It is the "love of money", not money itself.

When coming out with an excellent Study Bible, why taint its many good points with unnecessary commentary?  That's all. 

Edward Engelbrecht

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #132 on: September 21, 2009, 03:31:27 PM »
On the topic of colors in Eden, it occures to me that Cranach painted his "Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden" in 1530, well into the Reformation. In the course of the painting, he assigned colors to the fruit, based on the colors of know fruit. I've never seen any evidence that this created a stir among theologians of the day. Apparently, it all seemed quite reasonable to do, as thousands of painters have done over the centuries.

My point was merely, "why say more than the Scriptures say?"  It is not meant to cause a stir at all.  Let us try to learn Scripture as best we can.  When a book is directed toward adults, not children, where's the need to comment on something that's mere speculation? 

And there is no benefit I know of to spread the idea that the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil was an apple, so why must some imply that such was the case--artists can probably choose from many fruit when depicting this account, even recognizing that the fruit back then might not have looked identical to modern varieties of fruit.

There are many common misquotes people assign to the Holy Scriptures.  One such example is that "Money is the root of all evil."  It is the "love of money", not money itself.

When coming out with an excellent Study Bible, why taint its many good points with unnecessary commentary?  That's all. 

Actually, The Lutheran Study Bible is designed with children in mind, not just adults. The foreword states,
 
“In the Lutheran Church, a broad range of readers use study Bibles. Users vary in age from thirteen-year old confirmation students who may be reading the Bible for the first time, to mature pastors with a master’s degree in theology. We have tried to provide a resource that could offer help to this broad readership. For example, readers who are new to the Bible will likely appreciate the overviews that appear on the first page of each introduction to a biblical book. Mature students may appreciate the citations of Luther and other Church Fathers that appear in the introductions and notes” (pp. xi—xii).

I’m not sure I understand why the mention of colors is so surprising. Genesis 2:9 states that “the Lord God made to spring up every tree that is pleasant to the sight and good for food.” “Every” would seem to include the apples, apricots, pomegranates, etc. that were known to be eaten in the ancient Near East. I’m not sure I understand why mentioning their colors would be a problem.

Anyway, peace to you.

Dave_Poedel

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #133 on: October 15, 2009, 09:30:23 AM »
Now that I have had some time with my new Larger Print Lutheran Study Bible, I wanted to share some impressions:

I have had the AF LSB for a couple of months and carried it around with me and in my car for a month or so and used it for my devotional reading and for study in sermon preparation.  I received my CPH version last week, so I have had less time with it.

1.  This is a BEAUTIFUL Bible!  I bought the Sangria color (I wondered what they called that color...it's the same as the Lutheran Service Book, The Lutheran Confessions, Reader's Edition, The Treasury of Daily Prayer and The Small Catechism) leather edition.  Very tough leather, not easily scratched.  While passing it around yesterday in Bible Class, one of the ladies dropped it, panic in her eyes....not to worry).  The binding appears to be sturdy.

2.  This is a LARGE Bible.  I like the fact that the Larger Print is a "magnified" version of the regular size page, so the proportions of the page are the same.  The type size is easy to read, especially in the notes on the bottom of the page.

3. The layout is very easy to navigate.  Obviously I have not had sufficient time to evaluate the study notes, but in my use for daily reading they appear to be useful and focused.

4. If there is any downside at all it is that the Bible is LARGE, which makes carrying around a deliberate action.  Maybe it's a bt bulky, but the volume of information contained make it pretty much self-contained for study.  A built in commentary means I can take it to a coffee shop and do study and reading without needing to bring another volume.

All in all, this is quite a comprehensive study Bible!  The inevitable comparisons to the AF NRSV Lutheran Study Bible are totally not fair.  The two Bibles are not in the same league at all; perhaps they were not intended to be.  The AF version is much smaller and thinner and the notes are nowhere near as comprehensive.  Being a Lutheran of a conservative flavor, I obviously favor the CPH study notes and commentary, but even that notwithstanding, the CPH offering is for me a much more useful Study Bible.


revjagow

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Re: The Lutheran Study Bible
« Reply #134 on: October 15, 2009, 09:45:53 AM »
Thanks, Padre!

I knew the excitement was justified.  I'm planning on promoting this at our church and putting a big order into CPH so that people get their editions in time for Christmas.

As a follow up, I'm planning to launch into a year covering the "Bible Essentials" all through next year as a way to increase literacy in the Word and get people into devotional reading too. 
Soli Deo Gloria!