Author Topic: Miscellaneous Questions  (Read 8286 times)

ptom

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Re: Miscellaneous Questions
« Reply #60 on: May 13, 2009, 12:09:56 PM »
We do the quilt thing also, here in the upper midwest, where the kids take the quilts with them to school and really use them.
 Faith Inkubators has a neat litany that goes along with giving them.
Life is much more manageable when thought of as a scavenger hunt as opposed to a surprise party.

iowakatie1981

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Re: Miscellaneous Questions
« Reply #61 on: May 13, 2009, 02:24:10 PM »
The wine here at seminary...not sure what the deal is with it, but it comes in shot glasses, like, the size of actual shots of liquor, and I don't know what's in it, but I have to make sure I eat breakfast before chapel because otherwise I will pass out before I get back to my pew.

racin_jason

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Re: Miscellaneous Questions
« Reply #62 on: May 13, 2009, 03:20:29 PM »
Which seminary, Katie? Your description fits the cups at Luther Seminary in St. Paul...I liked the size of those. 

Concerning graduation gifts, we don't have quilters, so that's out. The kids got a cross from Thrivent four years prior, so that option is also out. Most graduation gifts are candles or paperweights or pens with Bible verses on them, but I was hoping somebody had a more practical suggestion.  Oh well.

The other funny thing about this is that we budget the same amount each year, but the number of graduates varies, so one small group even got nice Bibles, but this year we have five...so they won't be so fortunate.

This whole enterprise has little to do with Jesus and has a lot to do with sentimentality. Call me cynical, but that's my take on all this graduation business.  What most graduating seniors need is a map, so that they can find their way back to church (sometimes being a curmudgeon is fun).
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Iowegian

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Re: Miscellaneous Questions
« Reply #63 on: May 13, 2009, 03:35:48 PM »
This whole enterprise has little to do with Jesus and has a lot to do with sentimentality. Call me cynical, but that's my take on all this graduation business.  What most graduating seniors need is a map, so that they can find their way back to church (sometimes being a curmudgeon is fun).

Oooh.. tying in elsewhere, how about a book of some kind (even a gift bible, etc.) that includes an addressed letter of some sort that will impact their future?  (If the kid is 'staying near home', a letter of congratulations and encouragement, if the kid is 'going away to college' how about an introductory letter from the campus ministry pastor and an appointment to meet?)

SCPO

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Re: Miscellaneous Questions
« Reply #64 on: May 13, 2009, 03:36:23 PM »
     Call me cynical, but that's my take on all this graduation business.  What most graduating seniors need is a map, so that they can find their way back to church (sometimes being a curmudgeon is fun).

     I'm impressed that your youth continue to attend up to graduation.   It has been my experience that we rarely see our youth after they are confirmed.     

Regards,

Senior

Erme Wolf

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Re: Miscellaneous Questions
« Reply #65 on: May 13, 2009, 03:44:25 PM »
    Here's what been done at parishes in which I have served.  The high school graduates come forward, along with the parents (or grandparents, or whoever the student chooses who has been a significant person in their growing up).  There is a litany of blessing, in which the parents place their hands on the head of their child and bless this child who is graduating and going into the world (whether college, or job, or military, or not-too-sure-yet).  And then the child/young adult stands and turns to face the parents, and placing a hand on them in blessing (usually on the shoulder, since they feel "funny" about the head thing), give a blessing to them, asking the Lord to watch over the ones who spent so many years watching over them.  Sentimental?  Yes, there usually isn't a dry eye in the place.  But also a lived parable of one's blessings returning to one after many years.  (Usually the child also hands the parents a carnation.)

    I will also say that this ceremony is the culmination of years of such ceremonies, usually (not always) beginning with the baptism of that child in infancy.  It's called "Milestone Ministry" and there's some good material for getting this started in a congregation through the Youth and Family Institute.  It could become just a gimmick, but isn't intended to be.  At each Milestone the child receives something tangible that is a sign of the milestone being recognized.  At this last one, it is the child who gives the gift, rather than receiving one.   It is part of an attempt to put parents back in the place of being the primary instructors in the faith to the children in their care, and the congregation being assistants to the families in this role.

   (And I actually like the quilt idea, and would probably introduce it if this congregation didn't have at least 20 high school graduates every year.)

revklak

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Re: Miscellaneous Questions
« Reply #66 on: May 13, 2009, 10:43:32 PM »
How about another miscellaneous question of a deep theological nature.  For all my Lutheran life (since I was baptized in 1958), nearly every Lutheran church I attended as a member or visitor (including LCMS) has used Mogen David red wine for the Sacrament.

That rot gut had not passed my lips for years and years, and now I've encountered it twice in the last month. Ugh! I'm surprised any congregation that uses it can manage to have Eucharist every Sunday.

Just to rehash this old discussion -- I partcularly LOVE Mogen DAavid wine... could be because we were weaned on it.  EVery Christmas, for about years old on up, we always got our own, litte, bottle of Mogen David Concord GRape -- Love it love it love it -- like manna (wine) from heaven

edoughty

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Re: Miscellaneous Questions
« Reply #67 on: May 14, 2009, 08:16:44 AM »
How about another miscellaneous question of a deep theological nature.  For all my Lutheran life (since I was baptized in 1958), nearly every Lutheran church I attended as a member or visitor (including LCMS) has used Mogen David red wine for the Sacrament.

That rot gut had not passed my lips for years and years, and now I've encountered it twice in the last month. Ugh! I'm surprised any congregation that uses it can manage to have Eucharist every Sunday.

Just to rehash this old discussion -- I partcularly LOVE Mogen DAavid wine... could be because we were weaned on it.  EVery Christmas, for about years old on up, we always got our own, litte, bottle of Mogen David Concord GRape -- Love it love it love it -- like manna (wine) from heaven

Are you joking?  Please be joking!

Oy. . .

Erik

racin_jason

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Re: Miscellaneous Questions
« Reply #68 on: May 14, 2009, 08:39:50 AM »
     Call me cynical, but that's my take on all this graduation business.  What most graduating seniors need is a map, so that they can find their way back to church (sometimes being a curmudgeon is fun).

     I'm impressed that your youth continue to attend up to graduation.   It has been my experience that we rarely see our youth after they are confirmed.     

Regards,

Senior

That's our experience too, that's why a map or a GPS would be the perfect gift, so they can find us. Often times we haven't seen the kids on a non-holiday since confirmation sunday. Organizing a senior recognition sunday usually includes a "I know we haven't been to church for a while" statement from the senior or the parents.  This isn't true for all the kids, but for many of them. 
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Dadoo

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Re: Miscellaneous Questions
« Reply #69 on: May 14, 2009, 09:35:30 AM »
How about another miscellaneous question of a deep theological nature.  For all my Lutheran life (since I was baptized in 1958), nearly every Lutheran church I attended as a member or visitor (including LCMS) has used Mogen David red wine for the Sacrament.

That rot gut had not passed my lips for years and years, and now I've encountered it twice in the last month. Ugh! I'm surprised any congregation that uses it can manage to have Eucharist every Sunday.

Just to rehash this old discussion -- I partcularly LOVE Mogen DAavid wine... could be because we were weaned on it.  EVery Christmas, for about years old on up, we always got our own, litte, bottle of Mogen David Concord GRape -- Love it love it love it -- like manna (wine) from heaven

Are you joking?  Please be joking!

Oy. . .

Erik

Well, the Concord Grape is a native North American species of Grape; well technically it was cultivated from the "Fox Grape" which is a native species.   For some folks using the native varieties as the wine for communion is somehow important. One's living room might be good place for wine connoisseurship; the altar rail, not so much. 

Personally, I prefer Dandelion or Cranberry wine, but ultimately I am partial to "Barley Pop."
Peter Kruse

Diversity and tolerance are very complex concepts. Rigid conformity is needed to ensure their full realization. - Mike Adams

frluther1517

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Re: Miscellaneous Questions
« Reply #70 on: May 14, 2009, 09:54:52 AM »
Any Boone's Farm lovers out there?    ;D

I have a miscellaneous question, which I was going to post as a new thread but since there is a perfect place for such questions, here it goes. 

I have a parishioner who wants to learn more about Lutheran Theology/Doctrine/Practice/Biblical Interpretation and I told him I would prepare a kind of Top Ten reads for beginning introduction to deeper study of Lutheran Doctrine and Luther Study.  I have a few in mind, but I am sure there are many that aren't coming to mind.  So...What books would you recommend to a lay person wanting deeper Lutheran/Luther study?  (Introductory to Moderate level)

Dadoo

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Re: Miscellaneous Questions
« Reply #71 on: May 14, 2009, 09:59:22 AM »
Any Boone's Farm lovers out there?    ;D

I have a miscellaneous question, which I was going to post as a new thread but since there is a perfect place for such questions, here it goes. 

I have a parishioner who wants to learn more about Lutheran Theology/Doctrine/Practice/Biblical Interpretation and I told him I would prepare a kind of Top Ten reads for beginning introduction to deeper study of Lutheran Doctrine and Luther Study.  I have a few in mind, but I am sure there are many that aren't coming to mind.  So...What books would you recommend to a lay person wanting deeper Lutheran/Luther study?  (Introductory to Moderate level)

Forde: On Being a Theologian of the Cross

Kleinig: Grace upon Grace

Luther: Freedom of a Christian or Christian Liberty, depending what the translator/publisher chose to call it.
Peter Kruse

Diversity and tolerance are very complex concepts. Rigid conformity is needed to ensure their full realization. - Mike Adams

Mike in Pennsylvania

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Re: Miscellaneous Questions
« Reply #72 on: May 14, 2009, 10:00:34 AM »
This year on "Honor the Graduates" Sunday we have one high school graduate and 7 college graduates, 5 of whom attended the local university, so there is a reasonable chance they'll show up.  Does anybody have any suggestions or resources for acknowledging those getting their B.A.'s?
NALC Interim Pastor

Iowegian

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Re: Miscellaneous Questions
« Reply #73 on: May 14, 2009, 10:11:34 AM »
Any Boone's Farm lovers out there?    ;D

I have a miscellaneous question, which I was going to post as a new thread but since there is a perfect place for such questions, here it goes. 

I have a parishioner who wants to learn more about Lutheran Theology/Doctrine/Practice/Biblical Interpretation and I told him I would prepare a kind of Top Ten reads for beginning introduction to deeper study of Lutheran Doctrine and Luther Study.  I have a few in mind, but I am sure there are many that aren't coming to mind.  So...What books would you recommend to a lay person wanting deeper Lutheran/Luther study?  (Introductory to Moderate level)

Forde: On Being a Theologian of the Cross

Kleinig: Grace upon Grace

Luther: Freedom of a Christian or Christian Liberty, depending what the translator/publisher chose to call it.

I'd add Forde's "Where God Meets Man", Martin Marty's little biography of Luther, the collection from Luther's Works titled "Martin Luther's Basic Theological Writings" (which includes "Freedom of A Christian" rec'd. above) , a version of CPH's "Concordia: Reader's Edition" (not the pocket; one of the 'big' versions for all of the background material and articles), Braaten's "Principles of Lutheran Theology".

I've found that I (as a layman myself) haven't gone wrong with any of Forde or Braaten's works:  they're both well grounded yet very engaging writers.

Team Hesse

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Re: Miscellaneous Questions
« Reply #74 on: May 14, 2009, 10:19:53 AM »
I have a parishioner who wants to learn more about Lutheran Theology/Doctrine/Practice/Biblical Interpretation and I told him I would prepare a kind of Top Ten reads for beginning introduction to deeper study of Lutheran Doctrine and Luther Study.  I have a few in mind, but I am sure there are many that aren't coming to mind.  So...What books would you recommend to a lay person wanting deeper Lutheran/Luther study?  (Introductory to Moderate level)

Forde: On Being a Theologian of the Cross

Kleinig: Grace upon Grace

Luther: Freedom of a Christian or Christian Liberty, depending what the translator/publisher chose to call it.

The Hammer of God -- Bo Giertz
Where God Meets Man -- Gerhard Forde
Luther for Armchair Theologians -- Steve Paulson
The Genius of Luther's Theology -- Kolb & Arands

Lou