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Messages - RDPreus

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46
Your Turn / Re: Remote ashes???
« on: February 18, 2021, 04:28:47 PM »
Since I have never imposed ashes nor have I received them I don't suppose my opinion on this matters much, but it occurs to me that if someone wants to be reminded of his mortality and sin as he enters into Lent, he could simply impose ashes on his own forehead in the privacy of his own home.  The Sacrament belongs to the church and is administered by the pastor of the church when the church is assembled together.  But is the imposition of ashes a uniquely churchly function?  May not any Christian do this privately?

I think the short answer is Yes.  At the other end of the spectrum, the church through its pastor or spiritual leaders can take the ashes to homes for imposition, or to the subway stop/bus stop/7-11.  I can also say that no one I have ever met has told me that they applied ashes to themselves at home or anywhere else.

However, there is this:  I have always been drawn to the example of public penitence through sackcloth and ashes mandated by the ruling authority, as in Jonah, where upon hearing the one sentence message of the prophet, the king believes God and calls for a national day of penitence while sitting in ashes, including not only human beings but animals, all of which were decked out in the sackcloth and ashes befitting the rite.  Jonah didn't deck them out; it seems from the text that they took care of themselves.  And - God did not destroy the city, much to Jonah's dismay.  If that took place in Montana, I'm thinking the apparel cost for animals would far outstrip the cost for humans, no?  Who was the happiest man in Ninevah?  The Producer of Sackcloth.

Not insubstantially to the overall theme of Lent, the time-frame for destruction given to the Ninevites absent repentance is ------ 40 days. 

Out of curiosity, when during the service do you make the sign of the cross (at a service of Holy Communion), if you're in the pastoral role?

Dave Benke

I would make the sign of the cross over the elements when singing the words of institution, specifically, during the words "take eat" and "drink of it all of you."  I would make the sign of the cross over the communicants when dismissing them from the Communion rail.  And I would make the sign of the cross over the congregation when pronouncing the Benediction.  I don't cross myself. 

47
Your Turn / Re: Remote ashes???
« on: February 18, 2021, 03:49:53 PM »
Since I have never imposed ashes nor have I received them I don't suppose my opinion on this matters much, but it occurs to me that if someone wants to be reminded of his mortality and sin as he enters into Lent, he could simply impose ashes on his own forehead in the privacy of his own home.  The Sacrament belongs to the church and is administered by the pastor of the church when the church is assembled together.  But is the imposition of ashes a uniquely churchly function?  May not any Christian do this privately?   

48
Your Turn / Re: Women Ordination in Roman Catholicism
« on: February 18, 2021, 03:17:39 PM »
But, Pastor Preus, your synod does not believe that scripture prohibits women lectors.

Oh, dear!  Well, that settles it then!
 ;D

49
Your Turn / Re: Women Ordination in Roman Catholicism
« on: February 17, 2021, 03:22:42 PM »
That Rome gives women responsibilities denied to them by the clear Scriptures (for example, as lectors in the Divine Service) explains why she won't appeal to God's written Word, but rather to church tradition, as grounds for denying the priesthood to women.

50
Your Turn / Re: One Man's Story - leaving his denomination.
« on: February 04, 2021, 03:13:30 PM »
David Garner does not need anyone to defend him, but I’m going to jump in here nonetheless to point out that he has actually been an example of graciousness in the way he has spoken of his former confession of the faith. I think, Brian, the reason he puts that tag line at the bottom is not in the spirit of “glad I’m done with YOU guys” —else why even participate here?—but as a sort of showing of his bonafides as one who is actually well acquainted with the Lutheran Church. FWIW.

William, there you go again!  Putting the best construction on everything.  Explaining everything in the kindest way. :D

51
Your Turn / Re: Douthat: The political ascendancy of liberal catholicism?
« on: February 01, 2021, 06:36:37 PM »
In my experience, Roman Catholics tend to be more loyal to their church while Lutherans are more loyal to their doctrine.  When we Lutherans try to understand how a Roman Catholic can be pro-choice on abortion we should keep this in mind.  I assume that President Biden loves his mother, the Roman Catholic Church.  She may err here and there and lack a sufficiently progressive social conscience, but she's still his mother.  Honor your mother.  That doesn't mean you have to agree with her about everything.

Aye, but how does partaking of the Sacraments honor mother Church--much less God our Father and His Son--when one is not in communion with the teachings of the Church?           

Yes, but you must understand that the teachings of the Church evolve in accordance with new insight provided by the Holy Spirit and we must remain open to the leading of the Holy Spirit.  :)


Well, we do have God on his throne stating: "Behold, I am making all things new" or if you prefer: "Ἰδοὺ καινὰ ποιῶ πάντα." (Rev. 21:5). It is a present tense verb; not the future new heaven and new earth.


We also have Jesus stating that the Spirit of Truth will continue to teach us, because he was not able to give us all the truth (John 16:12).

Wasn't Jesus speaking to his apostles?  Didn't the Holy Spirit guide them into all truth just as Jesus promised He would?  And didn't they write it down in the New Testament, the apostolic Scriptures? 

52
Your Turn / Re: Douthat: The political ascendancy of liberal catholicism?
« on: February 01, 2021, 04:34:55 PM »
In my experience, Roman Catholics tend to be more loyal to their church while Lutherans are more loyal to their doctrine.  When we Lutherans try to understand how a Roman Catholic can be pro-choice on abortion we should keep this in mind.  I assume that President Biden loves his mother, the Roman Catholic Church.  She may err here and there and lack a sufficiently progressive social conscience, but she's still his mother.  Honor your mother.  That doesn't mean you have to agree with her about everything.

Aye, but how does partaking of the Sacraments honor mother Church--much less God our Father and His Son--when one is not in communion with the teachings of the Church?           

Yes, but you must understand that the teachings of the Church evolve in accordance with new insight provided by the Holy Spirit and we must remain open to the leading of the Holy Spirit.  :)

53
Your Turn / Re: Douthat: The political ascendancy of liberal catholicism?
« on: February 01, 2021, 03:18:46 PM »
In my experience, Roman Catholics tend to be more loyal to their church while Lutherans are more loyal to their doctrine.  When we Lutherans try to understand how a Roman Catholic can be pro-choice on abortion we should keep this in mind.  I assume that President Biden loves his mother, the Roman Catholic Church.  She may err here and there and lack a sufficiently progressive social conscience, but she's still his mother.  Honor your mother.  That doesn't mean you have to agree with her about everything.

54
Years ago, during the week of Quasimodogeniti Sunday (the Gospel Lesson is from John 20 where Jesus gives the authority to forgive and retain sins to his church), a lady in the congregation came to visit me.  In the sermon I had talked about the great comfort personal absolution provides us.  She wanted to confess that she had had an abortion years earlier and that it weighed on her conscience and she wanted absolution for that sin.  She confessed and I absolved her.  Jesus forgave her the sin of abortion through his minister.  She knew that abortion was a sin.  She sought and received forgiveness.  What a joy absolution is!  To know that the word we hear from the minister (who is a sinner like us) actually conveys to us the forgiveness that Jesus won by his bitter suffering and death.  There is no greater knowledge in the world.  When we believe, teach, confess, and preach this, there is no sin that can destroy us.  We can preach against abortion, sodomy, adultery, theft, lying, cheating, stealing, dishonoring parents, despising God's word and misusing his name and worshipping false gods.  We can preach against these sins with specificity and the full authority of God's law that damns all sinners to hell.  We can preach this because we know that that's not God's final word to us!  He forgives sinners out of his boundless grace.  His grace is greater than any sin.  To preach and to hear the preaching of the blood and righteousness of Jesus is the greatest privilege on earth.  We go to church burdened by sin and guilt.  God gives us in the oral and sacramental word full forgiveness of all our sins.  We mustn't fear preaching the law.  But woe to the preacher who doesn't preach the gospel!

55
How do you handle the distinction that I mentioned in number 3 in my post?

We need to speak very clearly and not in generalities.  In doing so we can avoid laying guilt on women who have lost babies through no choice of their own as, for example, in the case of a tubal pregnancy.

56
I used to observe "Life Sunday," but decided that it would be better to address abortion throughout the year where appropriate.  Civil law is a teacher of the moral law.  Since the "pro-choice" position is codified in our civil law, we are being taught by the state that a woman has the right to decide to have her unborn child killed.  I believe that the preacher has the duty to refute this and to address abortion specifically as he preaches on the fifth commandment.  He should rebuke the governing authorities for failing to protect the most helpless of us.  Clearly, the preacher should also address other life issues on the basis of the Holy Scriptures. 

57
Your Turn / Re: The Church's Response to Government and Governing
« on: January 18, 2021, 04:04:56 PM »
Is anyone familiar with the argument that the word "indivisible" in the Pledge was written against Southern sentiment of the day that still thought that states had the right to secede from the Union?  I don't know where I heard this or if there is any validity to it.


Yes, it was related to the civil war. See the quote from Bellamy I offered in post #146.

Thank you.

58
Your Turn / Re: The Church's Response to Government and Governing
« on: January 18, 2021, 02:55:01 PM »
Is anyone familiar with the argument that the word "indivisible" in the Pledge was written against Southern sentiment of the day that still thought that states had the right to secede from the Union?  I don't know where I heard this or if there is any validity to it. 

59
Your Turn / Re: Civil unrest and Christian witness
« on: January 07, 2021, 02:25:27 PM »
A young woman by the name of Ashley Babbitt has been shot dead by the D. C. police.  She was unarmed.  Witnesses said she was not engaged in violent activity when she was shot.  Extreme care was exercised last summer by police dealing with riots across our country to avoid unnecessary deaths by using non-lethal force.  Why did the police officer who killed Ashley Babbitt use deadly force?

If it was just her, it would be one thing. But it wasn't. There was an entire mob there. Armed U.S. Capitol Police were behind a door, protecting elected lawmakers. The mob chanted, “break it down" and smashed a window.

At that point, Ms. Babbitt attempted to crawl through the broken window and a police officer fired a shot that ended her life.

Her death is sad. But what would you think would happen when you try breaking into an area of the Capitol through a broken window while a mob is trying to break down a door? Especially when there are armed police on the other side. This was tragic, but it was also completely avoidable. She could have stayed on the street. She could have stayed with the door. She could have stayed away from that window. But she made some bad choices and they led to a sad outcome.

Am I to understand that you approve of what the police officer did when he shot her dead?

60
Your Turn / Re: Civil unrest and Christian witness
« on: January 07, 2021, 12:06:36 PM »
A young woman by the name of Ashley Babbitt has been shot dead by the D. C. police.  She was unarmed.  Witnesses said she was not engaged in violent activity when she was shot.  Extreme care was exercised last summer by police dealing with riots across our country to avoid unnecessary deaths by using non-lethal force.  Why did the police officer who killed Ashley Babbitt use deadly force?

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