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Messages - Boris

#1
Very good question.
#2
Your Turn / Re: White for Easter?
April 11, 2024, 08:10:40 PM
Quote from: Dan Fienen on April 11, 2024, 06:59:34 PM
Quote from: Boris on April 11, 2024, 06:17:18 PMIf you must wear the Geneva gown, do it classy and with style, like an uptown Presbyterian who knows what he's doing. Do it with class, panache, and elegance. And please use the tab collar. No one wants to see your tie.
Beffchen
Indeed! They are called Beffchen in German. And I think they look so much nicer than a tie. The Presbyterian pastor at Fourth Presbyterian here in Greenville wears them and I think they give him a very distinguished look.
#3
Your Turn / Re: White for Easter?
April 11, 2024, 06:17:18 PM
If you must wear the Geneva gown, do it classy and with style, like an uptown Presbyterian who knows what he's doing. Do it with class, panache, and elegance. And please use the tab collar. No one wants to see your tie.
#4
Quote from: Brian Stoffregen on April 08, 2024, 07:36:56 PM
Quote from: David Garner on April 08, 2024, 07:20:51 PM
Quote from: Brian Stoffregen on April 08, 2024, 06:52:53 PM
Quote from: David Garner on April 08, 2024, 02:22:35 PMNKJV, mostly because that's what the Orthodox Study Bible uses and that's my most often-used version.  I do love the ESV, and I cross-reference with others frequently to get an idea of what a passage is saying as best I am able.  I'll go to the Greek and a Lexicon where I need more clarity.

For most reading though, it's NJKV and whatever they used to translate the OT (I'm pretty sure it's some version of the Septuagint, though I haven't researched the methodology behind that translation).
As I recall, the Orthodox Study Bible used the NJKV Old Testament, and modified it where it differed from the LXX.

Yeah, looking it up on Wiki it appears that was the case with the original version, but the 2008 edition is now based on a translation from the Septuagint that itself apparently borrows from the NKJV:

"The translation is based upon the Alfred Rahlfs edition of the Septuagint using the Brenton edition and New King James Version Old Testament, which was translated from the Hebrew Masoretic Text, as additional source material."
From what I can tell, Rohlf's created his edition of the Septuagint in 1935 perhaps in German? Benton's translation is from 1844. The newest English translations of the LXX are the 2007 New English Translation of the Septuagint [NETS] and the 2020 Lexham English Septuagint, 2nd edition. I have them both. Some things I like about each of them, and some things I dislike. I wish that there were more choices of translations of the LXX.
I feel exactly the same way. I use the Lexham English Septuagint for my Old Testament now. Like Brian, there are things I like about it and things I don't like about it. No translation is perfect.
   For the New Testament, I alternate between the EOB New Testament, the ESV, the NKJV, and the KJV at home. At church, we use the RSV for the Altar Gospels. I had long suspected that we did and I finally asked my priest about it and he confirmed it. He really likes the RSV (and I do too), so I doubt that will change any time soon. I know the Antiochians produced an Altar Gospel a number of years ago that took the RSV text and corrected it according to the Patriarchal Text of 1904, the official Orthodox NT. At church our Epistles are read from the Apostol, produced by St. Tikhon's Seminary Press. It is a huge book that is used for the Epistle readings. It uses what is called "Revised Liturgical English": thou/thee for one person and you for more than one person. I like it. It is kind of half way between the KJV and the NKJV.
#5
That is really, really sad.
#6
It depends on the occasion for me.

1. For a Lessons and Carols Service at Christmas it must be KJV.
2. For regular Epistle and Gospels readings at Liturgy: RSV
3. For personal Bible reading, the ESV.
4. For the Psalter, the Douai Rheims (I love its use of the word "Christ" in Psalm 2)
5. For the Old Testament, the Lexham Septuagint.
6. For quick reading of obscure Old Testament books, the REB.
#7
Your Turn / Re: A Fascinating Presentation
March 31, 2024, 07:36:01 PM
Quote from: John Mundinger on March 31, 2024, 02:48:11 PM
Quote from: Boris on March 31, 2024, 01:52:26 PM
Quote from: John Mundinger on March 27, 2024, 09:52:15 AM
Quote from: Dave Benke on March 27, 2024, 09:01:56 AMThe megas growing in the LCMS are preaching family values.  That's what I see and hear at events like Best Practices.  It's not dissimilar at all from the more liturgical and smaller congregations. 

Dave Benke

The evangelical megas also preach "family values" - family values based on a macho understanding of biblical patriarchy.

What about single people like me? If find the idea that I need to have "family values" rather offensive and condescending. Is there something magical about families that makes them intrinsically more holy? Is there something about single people that makes us wicked? Why do we have to use the term "family values" at all? How about Christian morality and Christian ethics instead?


I whole heartedly agree, Boris.  When I think of "family values", the term means something very different than it does for conservatives who use that term in their political speech.

Thank you, John!
#8
Your Turn / Re: A Fascinating Presentation
March 31, 2024, 02:18:04 PM
Quote from: John_Hannah on March 31, 2024, 01:59:15 PM
Quote from: Boris on March 31, 2024, 01:52:26 PM
Quote from: John Mundinger on March 27, 2024, 09:52:15 AM
Quote from: Dave Benke on March 27, 2024, 09:01:56 AMThe megas growing in the LCMS are preaching family values.  That's what I see and hear at events like Best Practices.  It's not dissimilar at all from the more liturgical and smaller congregations. 

Dave Benke

The evangelical megas also preach "family values" - family values based on a macho understanding of biblical patriarchy.

What about single people like me? If find the idea that I need to have "family values" rather offensive and condescending. Is there something magical about families that makes them intrinsically more holy? Is there something about single people that makes us wicked? Why do we have to use the term "family values" at all? How about Christian morality and Christian ethics instead?


Yes! And what about widows like my mother who raised three of us by herself while working full time?

Peace, JOHN


Good point! Thank you, John!
#9
Your Turn / Re: A Fascinating Presentation
March 31, 2024, 02:16:37 PM
Thank you, John!
#10
Your Turn / Re: A Fascinating Presentation
March 31, 2024, 01:52:26 PM
Quote from: John Mundinger on March 27, 2024, 09:52:15 AM
Quote from: Dave Benke on March 27, 2024, 09:01:56 AMThe megas growing in the LCMS are preaching family values.  That's what I see and hear at events like Best Practices.  It's not dissimilar at all from the more liturgical and smaller congregations. 

Dave Benke

The evangelical megas also preach "family values" - family values based on a macho understanding of biblical patriarchy.

What about single people like me? If find the idea that I need to have "family values" rather offensive and condescending. Is there something magical about families that makes them intrinsically more holy? Is there something about single people that makes us wicked? Why do we have to use the term "family values" at all? How about Christian morality and Christian ethics instead?
#11
Your Turn / Re: Lay Consecration
March 14, 2024, 05:34:39 AM
I wonder how the Swedish Lutherans would feel about the non-ordained consecrating the Eucharist? I would think they would view it as a violation of good Church Order at a minimum.
#12
Your Turn / Re: Lay Consecration
March 13, 2024, 09:54:42 PM
What is the point of ordination if a layman can consecrate the Holy Eucharist already? Why is ordination even needed?
#13
Your Turn / Re: Eucharistic Sharing at Valpo
February 23, 2024, 08:51:55 PM
Quote from: Terry W Culler on February 23, 2024, 07:45:47 AMBoris, I was promoting what has been the traditional Protestant understanding of when the appropriate time for allowing children to commune.  If you belong to some other Christian group your disagreement is with Protestantism, not just me.

Really? Can you show me where in the Book of Concord that age 12 is specified as the "sacred age" to admit baptized children to the Lord's Table? If I recall correctly, Martin Luther abolished the Sacrament of Confirmation entirely. He put the onus back on the parents to teach their children about the Sacrament of the Altar. Before Confirmation was reintroduced to the German Lutheran Church during the period of Pietism, Lutheran children started to commune whenever their parents and the pastor thought they were mutually ready. Generally, if a child could answer Luther's "Christian Questions" at the end of the Catechism, it was considered enough. Johann Bugenhagen records that Lutheran children as young as four years old were receiving the Sacrament of the Altar when he did his pastoral visitations there.

Don't act so smug with me. You know that the Lutheran Church has never had a set age for the reception of one's first Eucharist and that it has varied considerably throughout history. I never asked you or anyone else here to adopt the Orthodox policy of infant communion.
#14
Your Turn / Re: Eucharistic Sharing at Valpo
February 23, 2024, 02:00:46 AM
Quote from: Terry W Culler on February 21, 2024, 03:20:45 PM
Quote from: Revpeter on February 21, 2024, 11:01:38 AM
Quote from: Terry W Culler on February 19, 2024, 09:23:46 PMPoint me to a 5 year old who can examine himself/herself, determining that they are sinners in need of grace.  I've never met such a person.  Separating first communion from confirmation has been a terrible mistake.
I have met many children of all ages who are much more accepting of the understanding that they are sinners and need God's forgiveness than many adults.


Proper examination of conscience is more than simply saying I didn't let Sally play with my ball but Jesus will forgive me.  There has to be true repentance which is at best a short term thing amongst children. Plus children below the age of 12 are generally able to think almost solely in concrete terms and cannot, therefore, understand the Eucharist.

So wait until their childlike faith is gone and replaced by raging adolescent hormones and teenage skepticism of everything holy? Yes, that must be the best approach.

And do you really understand the Eucharist? I am 60 years old and I don't completely understand it. Receive it in adoration, awe and wonder.
#15
Quote from: Brian Stoffregen on February 01, 2024, 05:54:19 PM
Quote from: Boris on February 01, 2024, 05:51:11 PM
Quote from: John Mundinger on January 30, 2024, 06:32:58 AMWhat is the rationale for assuming that it's theology of glory for homosexuals, when the theology of the cross is sufficient for everyone else?

Why do we assume that homosexuals must commit to celibacy before they may join the simul justus et peccator club?

What other method do you recommend for treating the passion of same-sex attraction other than celibacy?
The same advice Paul gave heterosexuals whose desire for sex made them shun celibacy - get married.

And how do you reconcile that with the the first chapter of St. Paul's letter to the Romans? Do you honestly think that is what he had in mind?
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