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ALPB => Your Turn => Topic started by: Dave Likeness on March 04, 2021, 11:32:41 AM

Title: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Dave Likeness on March 04, 2021, 11:32:41 AM
Most parish pastors usually have one or two Seminary Professors who impacted
their pastoral ministry.  You might want to share the name of that professor.

For me, it was Professor George Hoyer who taught Homiletics at Concordia, St. Louis
He made a Gospel distinction between merely reciting the facts of Christ's birth, public
ministry, death and resurrection and proclaiming the power of Christ in our dally lives.
We need to do both in our preaching from the pulpit.

Yes, the Crucified Christ forgives my sins.  The Resurrected Christ shares His victory
over death with me.  Christ strengthens my faith.  Christ speaks to me on the pages
of Holy Scripture, Christ gives me His body and blood in Holy Communion.  Christ hears
my prayers.  Christ guides my life.  Christ empowers me to do His Will
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Dave Benke on March 04, 2021, 11:38:06 AM
Most parish pastors usually have one or two Seminary Professors who impacted
their pastoral ministry.  You might want to share the name of that professor.

For me, it was Professor George Hoyer who taught Homiletics at Concordia, St. Louis
He made a Gospel distinction between merely reciting the facts of Christ's birth, public
ministry, death and resurrection and proclaiming the power of Christ in our dally lives.
We need to do both in our preaching from the pulpit.

Yes, the Crucified Christ forgives my sins.  The Resurrected Christ shares His victory
over death with me.  Christ strengthens my faith.  Christ speaks to me on the pages
of Holy Scripture, Christ gives me His body and blood in Holy Communion.  Christ hears
my prayers.  Christ guides my life.  Christ empowers me to do His Will

"God, comma, vocative."  Had him for one of the worship courses.

Dave Benke
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Jeremy Loesch on March 04, 2021, 12:02:11 PM
In no real particular order: Jeff Gibbs, Henry Rowold, Lou Brighton, Norman Nagel, Ron Feuerhahn, Bob Weise.

What did I learn?
Gibbs- devotion to the text
Rowold- devotion to the text and imagination with the text
Brighton- energy from the text; Jesus, Jesus, Jesus
Nagel- Everything is a gift; You can't do math with the Trinity; You get the whole lot; Vegemite is pretty good on toast.
Feuerhahn- older Christians, deceased Christians, they knew quite a lot about Jesus that we overlook.  The ecumenical movement is good but eyes have to be opened when they are talking.  Sherry is for people way more sophisticated than me.
Weise- Learn stuff.  Don't be afraid to be smart.  But never think you are smarter than anyone else. 

If I can go back to college, there were two professors there- Tom Gieschen and Tom Faszholz.
Dr. Gieschen was the Kapelle conductor, super organized, funny, compassionate, a firm hand with a light touch.
Coach Faz was a gentle spirit, fun loving, good to his players, loved, had expectations.

Jeremy
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Dave Benke on March 04, 2021, 12:04:02 PM
In no real particular order: Jeff Gibbs, Henry Rowold, Lou Brighton, Norman Nagel, Ron Feuerhahn, Bob Weise.

What did I learn?
Gibbs- devotion to the text
Rowold- devotion to the text and imagination with the text
Brighton- energy from the text; Jesus, Jesus, Jesus
Nagel- Everything is a gift; You can't do math with the Trinity; You get the whole lot; Vegemite is pretty good on toast.
Feuerhahn- older Christians, deceased Christians, they knew quite a lot about Jesus that we overlook.  The ecumenical movement is good but eyes have to be opened when they are talking.  Sherry is for people way more sophisticated than me.
Weise- Learn stuff.  Don't be afraid to be smart.  But never think you are smarter than anyone else. 

If I can go back to college, there were two professors there- Tom Gieschen and Tom Faszholz.
Dr. Gieschen was the Kapelle conductor, super organized, funny, compassionate, a firm hand with a light touch.
Coach Faz was a gentle spirit, fun loving, good to his players, loved, had expectations.

Jeremy

Faszholz, it is said, could have played in the NBA but chose the higher calling.

Dave Benke
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Charles Austin on March 04, 2021, 12:41:20 PM
In no particular order:
Horace Hummel, for what he taught us about J, E, D, and P as sources for the Pentateuch and what he taught us about history in Old Testament times. For years, I kept the notes from his OT class near at hand.
Carl Braaten, who had us read Tillich and the "newer guys" who taught me what systematics was about.
H. Grady Davis, homiletics professor who I admired because of his love for the Word and the words we use to preach. Our class voted to have him preach at our graduation.
Walter Kukkonen and Robert Fischer, for what they taught us about the confessions and Reformation history.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: peterm on March 04, 2021, 12:48:43 PM
Great topic!  I took many classes from Forde and Nestingen simply because they were a powerful combination together, though with very different approaches.  I would also include Roy Harrisville in the group of influential professors because he helped us/ forced us to dive into the Greek in his NT classes, and not be afraid of it.  He also held informal seminars at his home on Friday afternoons where he and the students would kick around and debate about theology over coffee and cookies

At the college level I would include Phil Quanbeck, long time head of the religion department at Augsburg University in Minneapolis, who broke open for me the Law/Gospel distinctions
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Weedon on March 04, 2021, 02:25:55 PM
Mine:

Dr. Norman Nagel (Systems, though he would say “Dogmatics.”)
Dr. Horace Hummel (Exegetical, and particularly for the Christological typological read of the Old Testament)
Prof. Jerry Eickmann (Systems, for teaching the actual dogmatic CONTENT of the Lutheran Confessions and not obsessing on rhetorical forms and such)
Dr. George Robert (Historical, for engendering a great love of the fathers)
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: RDPreus on March 04, 2021, 02:38:06 PM
Three professors who had the most influence on me were Robert Preus, Kurt Marquart, and David Scaer.  They were kind and pastoral men who taught their students to love Lutheran theology.  Nobody gave me better encouragement as a seminarian and as a young pastor than my father, Robert Preus.   
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: John_Hannah on March 04, 2021, 02:47:53 PM
Arthur Carl Peipkorn is at the top of my list. A strict confessionallist who knew the place of Lutheranism in the midst of all the competing Christian denominations without treating them negatively. Excellent at understanding liturgy as evangelization.

Hermann Sasse, visiting professor, had a rich grasp of theology through the turmoils of the 19th and 20th century drawing on all 20 centuries of Christian theology.

George Hoyer tied preaching to liturgy and religious education marvelously.

Fred Danker deepened my appreciation for the NT (Nestle).

Peace, JOHN
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: RDPreus on March 04, 2021, 02:54:58 PM
Most parish pastors usually have one or two Seminary Professors who impacted
their pastoral ministry.  You might want to share the name of that professor.

For me, it was Professor George Hoyer who taught Homiletics at Concordia, St. Louis
He made a Gospel distinction between merely reciting the facts of Christ's birth, public
ministry, death and resurrection and proclaiming the power of Christ in our dally lives.
We need to do both in our preaching from the pulpit.

Yes, the Crucified Christ forgives my sins.  The Resurrected Christ shares His victory
over death with me.  Christ strengthens my faith.  Christ speaks to me on the pages
of Holy Scripture, Christ gives me His body and blood in Holy Communion.  Christ hears
my prayers.  Christ guides my life.  Christ empowers me to do His Will


George Hoyer's wife, Dorothy, was my kindergarten teacher.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Charles Austin on March 04, 2021, 03:56:37 PM
George Hoyer’s son came into the ELCA and was my pastor in Maywood, New Jersey. He was an excellent preacher and Anglophile liturgist, and it was a joy to assist him at worship. He always invited me to help him in festival seasons.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Dave Likeness on March 04, 2021, 04:37:03 PM
Professor George Hoyer was genuinely interested in each seminarian's approach
to homiletics.  We would write sermons to be analyzed and graded by him.  Then
he would make copies of them for the entire class to analyze.  There was never a
dull moment in his classes.  Peter Hoffmann. the son of Lutheran Hour Speaker,
Dr. Oswald Hoffmann. was in my homiletics class.   Yet Prof. Hoyer treated him
just like the rest of us.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: George Rahn on March 04, 2021, 04:41:20 PM
Robert Bertram and Ed Schroeder, who both deepened my understanding of the content in the Lutheran Confessions.  Both also gave me insight on a different way of approaching ethics via the Erlangen tradition and Werner Elert.  Ethics is based on the impact of law and Gospel upon the person rather than the Kantian method of applying values to situations outside of the prior impact. 
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Pastor Ken Kimball on March 04, 2021, 05:23:49 PM
Gracia Grindal for preaching.   Walter Sundberg, church history. Mark Throntveit for Hebrew and Old Testament.  Roy Harrisville Jr., Romans and Galatians.  Roy was also my adviser and I rarely missed one of his and Norma's Friday afternoon coffee and cookies gatherings at their place during my time at LNTS (as it was initialed in those days).  Roy was a masterful and entertaining story-teller and a living repository of ELC (not ELCA, but the ELC and its predecessor Norwegian bodies) history.  He had been pastor to relatives of mine when he served in Mason City, Iowa. 
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: peterm on March 04, 2021, 07:25:32 PM
When were you at LNTS?  Technically I graduated from the last LNTS class in 94
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: PrTim15 on March 04, 2021, 07:49:32 PM
William J Schmelder ... “I have heard so much about concerned Lutherans, as if they are more concerned than anybody else, don’t think that way.”
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Dan Fienen on March 04, 2021, 07:53:39 PM
The great Gerhard Aho for homiletics, Harry Huth whose knowledge of the Confessions was encyclopedic, C. George Fry for some of the more interesting Systematic electives.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: GalRevRedux on March 04, 2021, 07:56:17 PM
Walter Michel, who was my adviser and OT prof. He was amazing in his zeal for Scripture.

Leroy Norquist, who taught NT at that time at LSTC. he was a small man with a mild manner - and an enormous spirit, faith and intellect. The course he co-taught with Joseph Sittler was one of the great experiences of my life.

Frank Sherman, a great professor of ethics and who was a leader in Christian-Jewish dialogue.

Robert Fisher, from whom I learned Church History and polity.

Sorry the list is long, but Jim Scherer was so important to me also. We had shared experience as missionaries to Japan, though he of course had so many rich years of service. I learned so much from him!

Donna
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Dave Benke on March 04, 2021, 08:53:58 PM
John F. Johnson who was a prof at Springfield, but prior to that was my confirmation pastor as well as instructor at Concordia Milwaukee, and who opened up to hundreds of us the wonder of God's grace in the Elements of Biblical Theology course.

Ralph Klein, Hebrew prof at Ft. Wayne Senior College and St. Louis Sem, who pushed and prodded a small group of us to search the Scriptures to plumb the depths of what it meant and what it means

Richard John Neuhaus, who taught a graduate seminar on how to be in pastoral ministry as an evangelical catholic priest every Wednesday evening at the rectory of St. John the Evangelist in Brooklyn.

Dave Benke
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: John_Hannah on March 04, 2021, 08:55:16 PM
I somehow forgot to mention Robert Bertram from whom I honed a deep seated understanding of Law/Gospel. Mea culpa, Bob.

Notable post seminary professors who influenced me greatly were John Tietjen on American Lutheran Unity.

Also Richard C. Wolf of Vanderbilt Divinity School on American Church history.

Peace, JOHN
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: John_Hannah on March 04, 2021, 08:57:01 PM
John F. Johnson who was a prof at Springfield, but prior to that was my confirmation pastor as well as instructor at Concordia Milwaukee, and who opened up to hundreds of us the wonder of God's grace in the Elements of Biblical Theology course.

Ralph Klein, Hebrew prof at Ft. Wayne Senior College and St. Louis Sem, who pushed and prodded a small group of us to search the Scriptures to plumb the depths of what it meant and what it means

Richard John Neuhaus, who taught a graduate seminar on how to be in pastoral ministry as an evangelical catholic priest every Wednesday evening at the rectory of St. John the Evangelist in Brooklyn.

Dave Benke

Richard John Neuhaus, who taught a graduate seminar on how to be in pastoral ministry as an evangelical catholic priest every Wednesday evening at the rectory of St. John the Evangelist in Brooklyn.

Yeah!!! Same here.

Peace, JOHN
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: D. Engebretson on March 04, 2021, 09:07:44 PM
Gerhard Aho was my primary homiletics prof. He instilled a discipline in me that took seriously how one approaches crafting a sermon in an organized fashion. Now as I teach homiletics for the SMP program years later, I know that it was his teaching that had the greatest impact on my work now.  I feel humbled, however, knowing that he was far more gifted in this area than I am. But I am thankful to have had him for most of my preaching courses even including one post-grad course.

Kurt Marquart and David Scaer shaped me in systematics.  I was grateful for the introduction to Sasse in Marquart's course that saved me in my first parish by helping me review the fundamentals of the Theology of the Cross.  Scaer taught me that exegesis and dogmatics go together.  The joke was that when you took him for a course it was always a version of a course on Matthew.  But how often do you open a Greek Bible in a systematics course?

The sainted John Seleska shaped my approach to pastoral theology with an approach that was deeply biblical even as we discussed psychology.

Art Just helped me understand the liturgy and influenced my love of its historic roots and meaning right into my post-graduate studies many years later. 
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Richard Johnson on March 04, 2021, 10:53:46 PM
George Lindbeck, who taught me to love doctrine and to understand its importance.

Brevard Childs, who exuded a love and respect for the Bible as Scripture.

Sydney Ahlstrom, who sparked my interest in American church history.

Don Saliers, who showed me that it was OK for a Methodist to love the liturgy.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Dave Likeness on March 04, 2021, 11:10:53 PM
Dr. Fred Danker taught a Theology of the New Testament class which
was an opportunity to learn from an excellent N.T. scholar.

Dr. A.C. Piepkorn taught our Dogmatics class for 2 of the 3 quarters.
He made Pieper come alive and added doctrinal insights along the way.

Dr. Robert Bertram taught two required Church Histor courses.  He
expected us to be able to debate the turning points in the life of the
church.

Along with George Hoyer, these three men above made an impact on  me
at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis.

Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Michael Slusser on March 04, 2021, 11:20:03 PM
Odd for me to chip in here, though I did take courses from three Lutheran professors at Luther Seminary. But the biggest impression on me was made by Prof. John Reumann, who taught NT at Lutheran Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. We worked closely together for a few years in the Lutheran-Catholic Dialogue, round X, and I came to admire greatly both his scholarship and his integrity.

Peace,
Michael
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: therevev on March 05, 2021, 09:45:18 AM
Jeff Gibbs: He made it clear that the pastor needs to know the text in unity and not just in pericope.
Ron Feuerhahn: The sherry at his home was always a wonderful bridge between being students and colleagues.
I had Norman Nagel for one class and I appreciated it a great deal. I also felt like a I was drinking from a fire hose.
Not on any other list yet, Paul Raabe's course on Amos taught me how to read the Old Testament with a desire to understand the prophet's context.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Pastor Ken Kimball on March 05, 2021, 11:03:06 AM
When were you at LNTS?  Technically I graduated from the last LNTS class in 94
1983-1987.  I was TALC (from the ELC part of that 1960 merger and curiously or unsurprisingly enough, the two congregations I've served for the last 26 1/2 years were both ELC; I suppose it's the church culture I knew best).  Anyway, it was an interesting exposure to the handful of profs from the Northwestern side of things.  My sense (but never took a count) was that most of my fellow sem students also came from TALC.  Glad to know we shared a common enjoyment of those Friday afternoons with Roy and Norma, though we didn't get to do it simultaneously.   
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: pastorg1@aol.com on March 05, 2021, 11:20:02 AM
Dr. Goeser who taught me the drama of the chalkboard while discussing Augustine and Luther.

Peter (If you’re not excited your students aren’t either) Garrison
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: peter_speckhard on March 05, 2021, 11:36:15 AM
I would say I had good professors generally in the sense that I learned the content of their courses well enough, and in many cases enjoyed the way they were taught. I liked Voelz's style and also played in the afternoon pickup soccer games he organized and a time or sat with him at Freddy Froghammer's for a Packer game. I liked Feuerhahn and the perspective he brought, as well as Brighton and his passion, especially his class on Revelation. I had Rossow for homiletics and he was in my vicarage congregation, so I know he and I saw eye-to-eye on preaching and how to bring literature and creativity to the task. I still say, "Fair enough," all the time having taken classes from Bartelt. But even listing these few names feels like leaving people off the list, because I could probably say something about every prof I had, and I can't really say of any one or few of them, "That was my mentor." I took whatever they had to offer.

I think I came to seminary without much perspective, so it never occurred to me that my professor was emphasizing something in particular that another professor might not emphasize, or bringing some personal insight or theological genius to the table that wasn't in the textbook. I didn't have the wherewithal to disagree with much of anything, or even anything else to compare it to. I took the classes as "This is what the people on the clergy roster believe, teach, and confess." So be it. It was only later, really in my last year of seminary and in contact with contrary viewpoints through ongoing education and reading that I started to see differences in emphasis and to be able to locate myself in relation to others. I think that gave me a solid theological platform from which to practice and apply what I had learned and engage with contrary teachings and practices. It wasn't until my last semester, after long talks with Paul Bretscher and some correspondence with people like Ed Schroeder that I started to really understand the nuances of the issues and why their views were incompatible with what I had been taught. I still have a big drawer full of snail mail correspondence with Paul Bretscher from about 20-25 years ago.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Steven W Bohler on March 05, 2021, 12:04:56 PM
Since the question was which seminary professor(s) that impacted one's ministry, and since vicarage supervisors were/are technically considered "adjunct instructors", I would say David Anderson, who supervised me as a vicar.  I learned much more about the practical and day-to-day work of a pastor from him than from the resident instructors (as wonderful as they were!).  The lessons I learned from him are used daily.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Dave Likeness on March 05, 2021, 01:39:59 PM
Pastor Bohler highlights an important part of the seminarian's experience and that is
the vicarage supervisor. At one time these vicarage supervisors were chosen with great
care and discernment by the seminaries.  Most of them were great mentors  to their
vicars.  It seems Pastor Bohler hit the jackpot on his vicarage.

Unfortunately, that is not always the case today.  Fewer parishes want a vicar and some
get one simply because they signed up  for one.  It is still important that a parish pastor
be a good mentor for his vicar and has something to offer him from his experience in the
parish.   There are still some congregations who want some cheap help for a year and
do not see the vicarage assignment as a learning process.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Dave Benke on March 05, 2021, 02:47:44 PM
Pastor Bohler highlights an important part of the seminarian's experience and that is
the vicarage supervisor. At one time these vicarage supervisors were chosen with great
care and discernment by the seminaries.  Most of them were great mentors  to their
vicars.  It seems Pastor Bohler hit the jackpot on his vicarage.

Unfortunately, that is not always the case today.  Fewer parishes want a vicar and some
get one simply because they signed up  for one.  It is still important that a parish pastor
be a good mentor for his vicar and has something to offer him from his experience in the
parish.   There are still some congregations who want some cheap help for a year and
do not see the vicarage assignment as a learning process.

In OJT (on job training) programs such as SMP, EIIT and Center for Hispanic Studies, the Vicar is with the mentor for a minimum of three years, often four.  That's more an early church than a medieval academic/internship model for formation into the pastoral office.  Certainly there have been vicars/interns who have returned to the congregation in which they vicared through the academic - year 3 of 4 - program.  But it's by far not the norm. 

The fact that maximum impact on ministry is made by a vicar supervisor should not be put on the side - it's a primary learning experience and speaks to what pastoral formation and education are. 

Dave Benke
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Rev Geminn on March 05, 2021, 03:53:08 PM
Since the question was which seminary professor(s) that impacted one's ministry, and since vicarage supervisors were/are technically considered "adjunct instructors", I would say David Anderson, who supervised me as a vicar.  I learned much more about the practical and day-to-day work of a pastor from him than from the resident instructors (as wonderful as they were!).  The lessons I learned from him are used daily.

I had an amazing vicarage supervisor, too. A similar experience.  I don't mean this as any sort of criticism of the faculty I had, but I don't think about them all that much. For better or for worse I looked at seminary as a means to an end, especially as a coast guy, but I will very forever cherish my vicarage year in Indiana.

Peace,
Scott+
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Tom Eckstein on March 05, 2021, 05:55:07 PM
Many professors influenced me in various ways, but the following are on the top of my list:

1.  Norman Nagel:   I had several classes with him, and especially loved his class on Holy Baptism.

2.  Louis Brighton:  I had several classes with him, and especially enjoyed a graduate course he taught on the Septuagint
          wherein we compared the LXX with the MT as well as the Vulgate.  We also spent some time in the Apocrypha.

3.  Francis Rossow:   He helped me unleash my creative juices for preaching!

4.  Jeff Gibbs: I had him for an STM course in Greek Readings and learned a lot from him.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Steven W Bohler on March 05, 2021, 06:20:53 PM
Pastor Bohler highlights an important part of the seminarian's experience and that is
the vicarage supervisor. At one time these vicarage supervisors were chosen with great
care and discernment by the seminaries.  Most of them were great mentors  to their
vicars.  It seems Pastor Bohler hit the jackpot on his vicarage.

Unfortunately, that is not always the case today.  Fewer parishes want a vicar and some
get one simply because they signed up  for one.  It is still important that a parish pastor
be a good mentor for his vicar and has something to offer him from his experience in the
parish.   There are still some congregations who want some cheap help for a year and
do not see the vicarage assignment as a learning process.

Yes, I was very blessed to be assigned the vicarage I had.  I was like the 19th vicar Pastor Anderson had (Rolf Preus was the first) and by the time I came, he had his teaching and methods down quite well.  But he DID say that his first vicar was the best, and it was downhill after that.  19th is pretty far downhill.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Charles Austin on March 05, 2021, 07:43:36 PM
When I arrived at my internship, my supervisor said something like this: "You are not an assistant. You are not here to do the work I can't or don't want to do. You and I are both full pastors here, we will share all the work, sometimes side by side, sometimes on our own." And that's the way it was. I preached twice a month, we split all the other pastoral duties pretty much equally, although he obviously kept the organizational and management things he knew best, but let me in on what that kind of work was. I probably spent more time with "the kids" than he did, but he was often there. We took communion to shut-ins together because at that time we did not have a rite whereby those not ordained could do that.
It was a pretty good year. And - since he and the congregation council (a number of IBM executives)  knew the value of continuing education - they allowed me to take a day a week during the school year to ride the train to New York City for a course at Union Seminary. 
The only hardship I remember was that my "office" was a desk, a chair a telephone, and a small bookcase in a corner of the church basement.  Running up and down those stairs was my daily exercise.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: RDPreus on March 05, 2021, 09:26:52 PM
Pastor Bohler highlights an important part of the seminarian's experience and that is
the vicarage supervisor. At one time these vicarage supervisors were chosen with great
care and discernment by the seminaries.  Most of them were great mentors  to their
vicars.  It seems Pastor Bohler hit the jackpot on his vicarage.

Unfortunately, that is not always the case today.  Fewer parishes want a vicar and some
get one simply because they signed up  for one.  It is still important that a parish pastor
be a good mentor for his vicar and has something to offer him from his experience in the
parish.   There are still some congregations who want some cheap help for a year and
do not see the vicarage assignment as a learning process.

Yes, I was very blessed to be assigned the vicarage I had.  I was like the 19th vicar Pastor Anderson had (Rolf Preus was the first) and by the time I came, he had his teaching and methods down quite well.  But he DID say that his first vicar was the best, and it was downhill after that.  19th is pretty far downhill.

He only said that his first vicar was the best because I was more Norwegian than he was.  :)  Pastor Anderson taught us by his example.  He loved the people he served and he loved God's Word.  He retired to Dubuque Iowa where he had served as a young man.  As an old man he became friends with my son Andrew who serves in Guttenberg.  I thank God that my son got to know him.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Steven W Bohler on March 05, 2021, 09:44:40 PM
Pastor Bohler highlights an important part of the seminarian's experience and that is
the vicarage supervisor. At one time these vicarage supervisors were chosen with great
care and discernment by the seminaries.  Most of them were great mentors  to their
vicars.  It seems Pastor Bohler hit the jackpot on his vicarage.

Unfortunately, that is not always the case today.  Fewer parishes want a vicar and some
get one simply because they signed up  for one.  It is still important that a parish pastor
be a good mentor for his vicar and has something to offer him from his experience in the
parish.   There are still some congregations who want some cheap help for a year and
do not see the vicarage assignment as a learning process.

Yes, I was very blessed to be assigned the vicarage I had.  I was like the 19th vicar Pastor Anderson had (Rolf Preus was the first) and by the time I came, he had his teaching and methods down quite well.  But he DID say that his first vicar was the best, and it was downhill after that.  19th is pretty far downhill.

He only said that his first vicar was the best because I was more Norwegian than he was.  :)  Pastor Anderson taught us by his example.  He loved the people he served and he loved God's Word.  He retired to Dubuque Iowa where he had served as a young man.  As an old man he became friends with my son Andrew who serves in Guttenberg.  I thank God that my son got to know him.

My parents came to visit when I was on vicarage and Pastor Anderson and his wonderful wife Arla had us all over for supper.  When my dad said that his mother was Norwegian, Pastor Anderson's eyes lit up and he said: "I KNEW there was something about Steve that I liked!"  He sure was proud of his Norwegian heritage.  Why, I could not say.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Dave Benke on March 06, 2021, 08:50:27 AM
Pastor Bohler highlights an important part of the seminarian's experience and that is
the vicarage supervisor. At one time these vicarage supervisors were chosen with great
care and discernment by the seminaries.  Most of them were great mentors  to their
vicars.  It seems Pastor Bohler hit the jackpot on his vicarage.

Unfortunately, that is not always the case today.  Fewer parishes want a vicar and some
get one simply because they signed up  for one.  It is still important that a parish pastor
be a good mentor for his vicar and has something to offer him from his experience in the
parish.   There are still some congregations who want some cheap help for a year and
do not see the vicarage assignment as a learning process.

Yes, I was very blessed to be assigned the vicarage I had.  I was like the 19th vicar Pastor Anderson had (Rolf Preus was the first) and by the time I came, he had his teaching and methods down quite well.  But he DID say that his first vicar was the best, and it was downhill after that.  19th is pretty far downhill.

He only said that his first vicar was the best because I was more Norwegian than he was.  :)  Pastor Anderson taught us by his example.  He loved the people he served and he loved God's Word.  He retired to Dubuque Iowa where he had served as a young man.  As an old man he became friends with my son Andrew who serves in Guttenberg.  I thank God that my son got to know him.

My parents came to visit when I was on vicarage and Pastor Anderson and his wonderful wife Arla had us all over for supper.  When my dad said that his mother was Norwegian, Pastor Anderson's eyes lit up and he said: "I KNEW there was something about Steve that I liked!"  He sure was proud of his Norwegian heritage.  Why, I could not say.

I knew Dave Anderson as a man both with a pastor's heart and with a strong sense of the primary purpose of a seminary.  We served together as two of the three ordained members of the Board of Regents at CTS-Fort Wayne from 1989-1991.  In those days we stayed on campus in one of the dorms for the board meetings, and the three of us had the pastor's wing on the bottom floor of a dorm behind the (then) library, so we hung out together. 

I was having an absolutely great time in parish ministry then; the congregation was booming, we were well into the Nehemiah Housing plan and our congregations were re-configuring that whole part of East Brooklyn, I was playing some of my best middle-aged softball.  To be immersed in the seminary's absolutely immense internal struggle was like entering a hospital emergency room the night of a big local gang fight (an image I had seen in reality), nothing but pain, triage and divvying up into sides of the room. 

Among the things that stuck with me was that the three of us ordained board members, although from way, way different congregations, shared the same pastoral instincts in our private conversations.  Love the Lord, love your people, serve the Lord, serve your people.

Anyone who was a student in that era had to have received an embattled education.  That impact on ministry can't be minimized.  I was at the St. Louis seminary in the time of its Blue Ribbon investigation and eventual blowup, which happened a few months after I left.  Plenty of impact there.

Dave Benke
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Dave Likeness on March 06, 2021, 12:12:34 PM
In the calm before the storm, my Seminary class was the last one to have
their diploma signed by Dr. Alfred Fuerbringer in 1968.  In the intramural
fast-pitch softball league, I was pitching for the undefeated team which
won the Championship.  We were called Dorm X and it was the married men.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: RDPreus on March 06, 2021, 12:39:48 PM
Pastor Bohler highlights an important part of the seminarian's experience and that is
the vicarage supervisor. At one time these vicarage supervisors were chosen with great
care and discernment by the seminaries.  Most of them were great mentors  to their
vicars.  It seems Pastor Bohler hit the jackpot on his vicarage.

Unfortunately, that is not always the case today.  Fewer parishes want a vicar and some
get one simply because they signed up  for one.  It is still important that a parish pastor
be a good mentor for his vicar and has something to offer him from his experience in the
parish.   There are still some congregations who want some cheap help for a year and
do not see the vicarage assignment as a learning process.

Yes, I was very blessed to be assigned the vicarage I had.  I was like the 19th vicar Pastor Anderson had (Rolf Preus was the first) and by the time I came, he had his teaching and methods down quite well.  But he DID say that his first vicar was the best, and it was downhill after that.  19th is pretty far downhill.

He only said that his first vicar was the best because I was more Norwegian than he was.  :)  Pastor Anderson taught us by his example.  He loved the people he served and he loved God's Word.  He retired to Dubuque Iowa where he had served as a young man.  As an old man he became friends with my son Andrew who serves in Guttenberg.  I thank God that my son got to know him.

My parents came to visit when I was on vicarage and Pastor Anderson and his wonderful wife Arla had us all over for supper.  When my dad said that his mother was Norwegian, Pastor Anderson's eyes lit up and he said: "I KNEW there was something about Steve that I liked!"  He sure was proud of his Norwegian heritage.  Why, I could not say.

Being of Norwegian background while serving as a pastor in the Missouri Synod gives a man a great benefit.  You see, Steve, when folks criticize the LCMS, we can assume a snooty posture of gentle judgment against Germans, saying such things as, "Well, Missouri's doctrine is quite sound, but, well, the German culture is rather boorish and oppressive."  In this way we can defend Missouri's doctrine while blaming Missouri's shortcomings on other people, namely, you Germans.  It usually works.   :)
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: PrTim15 on March 06, 2021, 12:44:55 PM
Vicarage supervisors and other pastors served as great models as far as what to do and what not to do. The sainted Pastor Leonard Klitzing taught me a level of pastoral care that is sacrificial and brings hope in terrible times. I remember him twice beating the ambulance to Memorial Hospital in Belleville IL. His caring soul brought a church back together after the pain of the walk out. He literally wore out his soles on his "work shoes" yearly. Thanks for going here Steve.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: jebutler on March 06, 2021, 01:29:12 PM
I'm often jealous of guys who had great vicarage/internship experiences. My entire year can be summed up in one event. I asked my (now sainted) supervisor if he wanted to read my first sermon before I preached it. His answer, "What--you think it's so good I should hear it twice and read it too?" It was all downhill from there.

Sem profs who impacted me: Charlie Knippel who counseled me after that horrifying vicarage and encouraged me not to drop out of seminary. David Daniel made history alive. Louis Brighton was a master of exegesis and pastoral warmth.  Dan Pokorny who brought preaching to life.

But the person who probably had the biggest impact what the senior pastor in my first call: Kennard Mueller. He was a master pastor. He mentored me, encouraged me, and yes, corrected me on occasion. I will always be grateful for him. He was what my vicarage supervisor should have been--and I got to work with him for seven years. I can only hope to be half the pastor he was.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: Steven W Bohler on March 06, 2021, 02:50:26 PM
I'm often jealous of guys who had great vicarage/internship experiences. My entire year can be summed up in one event. I asked my (now sainted) supervisor if he wanted to read my first sermon before I preached it. His answer, "What--you think it's so good I should hear it twice and read it too?" It was all downhill from there.

Sem profs who impacted me: Charlie Knippel who counseled me after that horrifying vicarage and encouraged me not to drop out of seminary. David Daniel made history alive. Louis Brighton was a master of exegesis and pastoral warmth.  Dan Pokorny who brought preaching to life.

But the person who probably had the biggest impact what the senior pastor in my first call: Kennard Mueller. He was a master pastor. He mentored me, encouraged me, and yes, corrected me on occasion. I will always be grateful for him. He was what my vicarage supervisor should have been--and I got to work with him for seven years. I can only hope to be half the pastor he was.

A couple of thoughts:

1) When I phoned Pastor Anderson to tell him I had been assigned as his vicar, his first question to me was how was I doing academically at the seminary.  I told him I was doing OK.  He said: "What does that mean?  Are you barely passing?"  I was worried that I would have a whole year of such conversations.  I later learned that was his sense of humor, but it was hard to read it unless you knew him.

2) When I had vicars, I ALWAYS read their sermons before they preached them.  And, if necessary, had them re-write them.  I cannot fathom how a supervising pastor would do otherwise -- vicars are not pastors.  They are still students.   The responsibility falls on the pastor.
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: D. Engebretson on March 06, 2021, 06:38:46 PM
I'm often jealous of guys who had great vicarage/internship experiences. My entire year can be summed up in one event. I asked my (now sainted) supervisor if he wanted to read my first sermon before I preached it. His answer, "What--you think it's so good I should hear it twice and read it too?" It was all downhill from there.

My vicarage was certainly not perfect, none are.  It was a challenge, but that turned out to be good.  I got a very realistic view of church and ministry. I had no illusions about what the church should look like when I finally assumed my own pastorate. My supervisor once had me preach an upcoming sermon to him privately while he sat before me in the pew.  At once point he walked up and joined me in the pulpit to show me something.  I don't know if I've carried into my ministry any specific advice he gave me on preaching, but I was impressed that he cared enough to take that much interest in it.

One of the high points of my vicarage was meeting my future wife.  Hard to top that! :)
Title: Re: Sem. Prof. Who Impacted Your Ministry?
Post by: pastorg1@aol.com on March 06, 2021, 11:40:38 PM
Dr. Donald Deffner and his class, “Evangelizing the Educated Adult.”
Helped me with my first book, “Witnesses to the Cross” (Along the lines of Platonic conversations on theological points.)

Peter (Peter C. Garrison) Garrison