ALPB Forum Online

ALPB => Your Turn => Topic started by: Eileen Smith on October 27, 2018, 05:49:27 PM

Title: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Eileen Smith on October 27, 2018, 05:49:27 PM
The following was sent out by Bishop Elizabeth Eaton this evening.  It seemed worth sharing.   Bishop Eaton advocates reaching out with acts/messages of love to those of the Jewish faith in our communities.  I think it's a worthwhile idea -- not simply on the clergy level but perhaps laity could, as well, be encouraged to share a note, a phone call, an email or an act of kindness with Jewish friends or members of the community.   Could a grass-roots effort of the church encourage civility among us? 

October 27, 2018

 Dear Sisters and Brothers,

I write to you with a broken heart – for the lives lost, wounded, and shattered by horrific hatred and violence at Tree of Life Congregation this morning. We join our Jewish neighbors and enter into mourning for all that has been lost. In our grief, God is our comfort. “The Lord is near to the brokenhearted, and saves the crushed in spirit” (Psalm 34:18).

From Pittsburgh to Portland, and around the world, Jews are living in fear. Anti-Semitism is on the rise. Public acts of hatred and bigotry against Jews are commonplace. As Christians, and particularly as Lutherans, we deplore and reject this bigotry. “We recognize in anti-Semitism a contradiction and affront to the Gospel, a violation of our hope and calling, and we pledge this church to oppose the deadly working of such bigotry, both within our own circles and in the society around us” (1994 Declaration of the ELCA to the Jewish Community).

We are reminded that hate-filled violence knows no bounds – whether a Sikh Temple in Oak Creek, a Christian church in Charleston, or a Jewish synagogue In Pittsburgh. As people of faith, we are bound together not only in our mourning, but also in our response. 

Therefore, in this tender moment of grief, let us reach out to those whose hearts are most broken – our Jewish neighbors. I encourage you to contact your local synagogue, or your Jewish colleagues, friends, and family members, to share your words of care, support, love, and protection. There may be specific acts you might offer to demonstrate your care, such as when the members of Faith Lutheran Church surrounded Congregation Beth Israel of Chico, California, serving as Shomrim, or guardians, as they observed Yom Kippur following a hate crime in 2009.

Such simple acts can go a long way to demonstrate our love, as an extension of God’s love. As we seek to heal the brokenhearted, we are assured that God is near. There is no greater promise in the face of grief.

In peace,

ElizabethEaton
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Donald_Kirchner on October 27, 2018, 06:40:19 PM
Very good. The only quibble is a view that, around the world, Jews live in fear. No, they do not. From Israel to around the world, the Jewish people are a brave lot, never to be intimidated. I have many Jewish friends, I dated a Jewish woman, I’ve worked with many Jewish men and women over the years. They do not live in fear.

We will remember this tragedy in our Prayer for the Church tomorrow.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Dan Fienen on October 27, 2018, 06:59:32 PM
Good words from PB Eaton.  Whether or not Jews live in fear is up to them.  That Jews have much that they could well fear is a fact of life.  In many places Jews have and continued to be threatened.  Israel lives amidst enemies, some who have made it a national goal to eliminate them as a nation and as a people.  Christians also in some places live under constant threat.  May God be with His people.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: James S. Rustad on October 28, 2018, 12:21:22 PM
Israel's recent response to terrorism was to make it easier for good guys to carry guns:

Quote from: Israel's Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan (https://www.breakingisraelnews.com/112770/israeli-gun-law-reform-passes/)
Many citizens have saved lives during terror attacks, and in the era of ‘lone-wolf’ attacks, the more qualified gun-carrying citizens there are, the better the chance to stop terror attacks without casualties and reduce the number of casualties.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Dan Fienen on October 28, 2018, 02:10:27 PM
I've come to realize that part of Israel's problem with world opinion is that they are too good at defending their people.  Perhaps if more of the terrorist attacks, rocket launches, cross border raids produced Israeli casualties that they can then point to as how their people are suffering, there would be more sympathy with their self-defense.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Donald_Kirchner on October 28, 2018, 02:22:17 PM
Israel's recent response to terrorism was to make it easier for good guys to carry guns:

Quote from: Israel's Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan (https://www.breakingisraelnews.com/112770/israeli-gun-law-reform-passes/)
Many citizens have saved lives during terror attacks, and in the era of ‘lone-wolf’ attacks, the more qualified gun-carrying citizens there are, the better the chance to stop terror attacks without casualties and reduce the number of casualties.

Contrast this with Obama's comment on the Pittsburgh attack. "And we have to stop making it so easy for those who want to harm the innocent to get their hands on a gun."
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: gan ainm on October 28, 2018, 02:44:13 PM
Israel's recent response to terrorism was to make it easier for good guys to carry guns:

Quote from: Israel's Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan (https://www.breakingisraelnews.com/112770/israeli-gun-law-reform-passes/)
Many citizens have saved lives during terror attacks, and in the era of ‘lone-wolf’ attacks, the more qualified gun-carrying citizens there are, the better the chance to stop terror attacks without casualties and reduce the number of casualties.

Contrast this with Obama's comment on the Pittsburgh attack. "And we have to stop making it so easy for those who want to harm the innocent to get their hands on a gun."

Points out the difference between those who recognize the reality of who is most capable and readily available to stop the bad guys and those who pine for utopia on this side of heaven by thwarting the good guys.  (But we must never let those nasty little facts hinder the SJW types in the quest for creating heaven on earth.)

 
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Donald_Kirchner on October 28, 2018, 03:46:53 PM
Israel's recent response to terrorism was to make it easier for good guys to carry guns:

[quote="Israel's Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan (https://www.breakingisraelnews.com/112770/israeli-gun-law-reform-passes/)"Many citizens have saved lives during terror attacks, and in the era of ‘lone-wolf’ attacks, the more qualified gun-carrying citizens there are, the better the chance to stop terror attacks without casualties and reduce the number of casualties.

All Israeli citizens over age 18 who are Jewish, Druze, or Circassian are conscripted into the military for at least two years. They will have training in the proper use of firearms. What if we conscripted all American citizens for military duty and training; and those who are deemed unfit to serve because of mental or physical health reasons are also not permitted to buy guns or ammunition?

Such a "what if" rightfully would be struck down by the Court.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Weedon on October 28, 2018, 04:46:44 PM
LET US PRAY for all affected by the violence in Pittsburgh:

God of Abraham, God of Isaac, God of Jacob, we grieve for those of Your ancient people whose lives were taken yesterday as they came together on the Sabbath. Grant mercy to the mourning, peace to the traumatized, and healing to the injured. Bring to an end the violence and hatred inflicted upon people because of their faith. Open hearts to welcome and rejoice in the peace that is finally only found in Him who once came among us in the flesh, as the prophets had long promised, whose own flesh was torn and whose blood was shed to bring the gift of God's love to all people, uniting them in Himself, the Blessed Seed of Abraham, even Jesus, our Lord. Amen.

[From LCMS FB Page]
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: J. Thomas Shelley on October 28, 2018, 05:31:26 PM
The office of the Greek Metropolis of Pittsburgh is located just a mile and half from the shooting scene.

My Priest shared with the congregation that, just a couple of weeks ago, our Metropolitan was standing along the street at the office waiting to cross, wearing the customary black Bishop's cassock.  With his curly white beard, his appearance could be considered rabbinical.

A passing car slowed, the window rolled down and the driver shouted "F*****g Jew!" , then sped off.

Perhaps this was the perpetrator of Saturday's shooting.

Perhaps not.

The chill across the Keystone State today is not just the northwest wind.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Dave Likeness on October 28, 2018, 06:44:08 PM
My only Jewish acquantance is MLB Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax. He was a Brooklyn/L.A.Dodger
who won three Cy Young Awards. I personally got his autograph when the L.A. Dodgers played
 the Braves in Milwaukee.

As an outstanding Jewish athlete , Koufax is remembered for refusing to be the starting pitcher
in game 1 of the 1965 World Series because it fell on Yom Kipper.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Donald_Kirchner on October 29, 2018, 08:47:59 AM
Israel's recent response to terrorism was to make it easier for good guys to carry guns:

Quote from: Israel's Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan (https://www.breakingisraelnews.com/112770/israeli-gun-law-reform-passes/)
Many citizens have saved lives during terror attacks, and in the era of ‘lone-wolf’ attacks, the more qualified gun-carrying citizens there are, the better the chance to stop terror attacks without casualties and reduce the number of casualties.

Another example:

Armed dad takes down masked shooter at McDonald's as kids, customers watch

https://www.foxnews.com/us/alabama-mcdonalds-gunman-killed-by-armed-dad-who-is-injured-in-shootout
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Daniel L. Gard on October 29, 2018, 10:28:19 AM
This is the message I sent to the Concordia University Chicago community:

Concordia Family,

Today I write to you with a heavy heart. This past week has been marred by both threats of violence and horrifying acts of murder. Last week, an individual was arrested and charged with mailing bombs to high profile individuals. On Saturday, at Tree of Life Synagogue near Pittsburgh, eleven of our fellow citizens were brutally murdered because of their religion. These inhuman actions join a growing list of violent political acts and violent acts against houses of worship – Jewish, Islamic and Christian. Kyrie eleison! Lord have mercy!

On October 31, we will remember the 501st anniversary of the Reformation. It too was a time of both political and religious violence and hatred. Each generation is painfully reminded that, ever since Cain murdered his brother Abel in Genesis 4, our human race is not only sinful but violently sinful. Yet God has embraced our sinful world with love and even became victim to murderous human evil by sending His Son to be crucified by and in place of fallen humanity. Yet murderous evil, the outgrowth of human sin, could not defeat the power of divine love as Jesus rose from death on Easter.

Luther wrote in the Small Catechism about the 5th Commandment (“You shall not murder”) these words, “What does this mean? We should fear and love God so that we do not hurt or harm our neighbor in his body, but help and support him in every physical need. ” Please join me in prayer:

•   For the survivors and loved ones of the victims at Tree of Life Synagogue and the entire Pittsburgh community
•   For those that contemplate political or religious violence that God would turn their hearts to ways of peace
•   For law enforcement and first responders who risk their lives by heading toward the sound of gunfire
•   For ourselves that we not only never hurt or harm our neighbor but have the courage to help and support them in both words and deeds

May the God of peace grant us peace!
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Dan Fienen on October 29, 2018, 10:55:29 AM
Thank you Dr. Gard for your good words.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: mariemeyer on October 29, 2018, 12:21:38 PM
For your information and thought - Marie Meyer

From Bend the ARC - Pittsburgh Website

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Bend The Arc: Pittsburgh
We are the Pittsburgh affiliate of Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice.

President Trump:

Yesterday, a gunman slaughtered 11 Americans during Shabbat morning services. We mourn with the victims’ families and pray for the wounded. Here in Mr. Rogers’ neighborhood, we express gratitude for the first responders and for the outpouring of support from our neighbors near and far. We are committed to healing as a community while we recommit ourselves to repairing our nation.

For the past three years your words and your policies have emboldened a growing white nationalist movement. You yourself called the murderer evil, but yesterday’s violence is the direct culmination of your influence. 

President Trump, you are not welcome in Pittsburgh until you fully denounce white nationalism.

Our Jewish community is not the only group you have targeted.  You have also deliberately undermined the safety of people of color, Muslims, LGBTQ people, and people with disabilities. Yesterday’s massacre is not the first act of terror you incited against a minority group in our country. 

President Trump, you are not welcome in Pittsburgh until you stop targeting and endangering all minorities.

The murderer’s last public statement invoked the compassionate work of the Jewish refugee service HIAS at the end of a week in which you spread lies and sowed fear about migrant families in Central America. He killed Jews in order to undermine the efforts of all those who find shared humanity with immigrants and refugees.

President Trump, you are not welcome in Pittsburgh until you cease your assault on immigrants and refugees.

The Torah teaches that every human being is made b’tzelem Elohim, in the image of God.

This means all of us.

In our neighbors, Americans, and people worldwide who have reached out to give our community strength, there we find the image of God.  While we cannot speak for all Pittsburghers, or even all Jewish Pittsburghers, we know we speak for a diverse and unified group when we say:

President Trump, you are not welcome in Pittsburgh until you commit yourself to compassionate, democratic policies that recognize the dignity of all of us.

 
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Donald_Kirchner on October 29, 2018, 12:37:54 PM
The purpose of that post, Mrs. Meyer, is...?  Surely not to perpetuate the divisiveness!   :(
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Dan Fienen on October 29, 2018, 12:59:41 PM
You, know, somehow I missed that anti-Semitism and intolerance was invented by Donald Trump.  Or that there was no divisiveness in America politics until he arrived on the political scene.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Eileen Smith on October 29, 2018, 01:15:15 PM
Very good. The only quibble is a view that, around the world, Jews live in fear. No, they do not. From Israel to around the world, the Jewish people are a brave lot, never to be intimidated. I have many Jewish friends, I dated a Jewish woman, I’ve worked with many Jewish men and women over the years. They do not live in fear.

We will remember this tragedy in our Prayer for the Church tomorrow.

Your post is of interest to me as I, as well, have many Jewish friends, including family members through marriage.  I cannot say that I've ever heard them express fear.    But I sensed something else about the people of Jewish faith and couldn't define it until now.

Yesterday afternoon I participated in a Trunk of Treat hosted by a local congregation.  My job wasn't so much to give out candy (although I did) but rather to engage those who stopped by my table in conversations about children making good choices as part of our school programs on substance abuse.  A family stopped by, mother father, two children, and grandmother.  After some conversation the parents and kids took their leave and the grandmother stayed a while.  She said to me, "I'm glad I came.  I need to be happy."   It seemed an odd thing to say so I asked if everything was all right and she responded that she recently moved here from Pittsburgh where she was a member of Tree of Life.   This brief yet somewhat intense encounter reminded me of my Jewish friends comforting me when my parents died with gifts of sweets.   The Jewish people have tasted much bitterness in their history and to this present day.  But they are able to recognize God's presence in their lives and in the midst of bitterness they find God's sweetness.  They are a strong people. 
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: MaddogLutheran on October 29, 2018, 01:16:03 PM
For your information and thought - Marie Meyer

From Bend the ARC - Pittsburgh Website

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Bend The Arc: Pittsburgh
We are the Pittsburgh affiliate of Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice.

[snip]

President Trump, you are not welcome in Pittsburgh until you commit yourself to compassionate, democratic policies that recognize the dignity of all of us.

As I've seen this reported in numerous places as somehow this group speaks for all Jews in Pittsburgh...I have to flag that as fake news.  I don't know what, if any, umbrella organization might do that, but it's not this group.  This statement is from a local chapter of a national organization whose website "about us" (https://www.bendthearc.us/about) includes this:

Bend the Arc is a movement of tens of thousands of progressive Jews all across the country. For years, we’ve worked to build a more just society. Now we’re rising up in solidarity with everyone threatened by the Trump agenda to fight for the soul of our nation

So it's really a partisan political group, not unlike the religious right.  This was there self-description even before this heinous act. Contrast that with this:

Rabbi Jeffrey Myers, who was leading services at the Tree of Life Synagogue during Saturday's shooting, told CNN's "New Day" Monday morning that, "the President of the United States is always welcome. I'm a citizen. He's my president. He is certainly welcome," Myers said.

As shouldn't surprise, the membership of the synagogue is split on this:

"I do not welcome this President to my city," Lynnette Lederman [a former president of the synagogue] told CNN's John Berman on "New Day" earlier Monday morning when asked about a letter from other Jewish leaders asking the President not to visit Pittsburgh.

These quotes can be found here:
https://www.cnn.com/2018/10/29/politics/tree-of-life-synagogue-president-trump-pittsburgh-shooting/index.html

And so we continue to have a problem with fake news...even from people with good intentions.  It makes one wonder a couple of things:  Who exactly is politicizing this tragedy?  What would be the reaction if a group previously hostile to President Obama had stated he was not welcome after a similar tragedy?  Perhaps a group or region who might have thought he was talking about them when said people cling bitterly to guns and religion.

Sterling Spatz
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Dave Benke on October 29, 2018, 01:18:55 PM
From our Brooklyn Borough President Adams:  https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/28/nyregion/eric-adams-brooklyn-guns.html

We have had armed police protection at our church at Easter for the last three years.  I supported our Precinct from the Christian side of the aisle after two imams were assassinated in the neighborhood last year, so that they have weekly police protection and higher protection on the main streets near their places of worship all the time. 

Borough President Adams has been invited and will most likely attend our Parish Hall Re-dedication ceremonies on November 11.  With his handgun. 

With an NYC/NYS licensed daycare center, our congregation must have surveillance cameras at exits/entrances, doors locked until access is given through security officer, and sign-in of all visitors.  These compliance steps are pretty much, to me, common sense methods to ensure the safety of children and staff.  They're not foolproof, but they have prevented what is usually parental visitation scuffles and violence, as well as unauthorized entrance.

Sunday is a different deal, however, with three doors open to the public from 9-2.  Which is two doors too many these days.  We must take these assaults on free worship seriously.

Dave Benke
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Eileen Smith on October 29, 2018, 01:25:43 PM
For your information and thought - Marie Meyer

From Bend the ARC - Pittsburgh Website

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Bend The Arc: Pittsburgh
We are the Pittsburgh affiliate of Bend the Arc: A Jewish Partnership for Justice.

[snip]

President Trump, you are not welcome in Pittsburgh until you commit yourself to compassionate, democratic policies that recognize the dignity of all of us.

As I've seen this reported in numerous places as somehow this group speaks for all Jews in Pittsburgh...I have to flag that as fake news.  I don't know what, if any, umbrella organization might do that, but it's not this group.  This statement is from a local chapter of a national organization whose website "about us" (https://www.bendthearc.us/about) includes this:

Bend the Arc is a movement of tens of thousands of progressive Jews all across the country. For years, we’ve worked to build a more just society. Now we’re rising up in solidarity with everyone threatened by the Trump agenda to fight for the soul of our nation

So it's really a partisan political group, not unlike the religious right.  Contrast that with this:

Rabbi Jeffrey Myers, who was leading services at the Tree of Life Synagogue during Saturday's shooting, told CNN's "New Day" Monday morning that, "the President of the United States is always welcome. I'm a citizen. He's my president. He is certainly welcome," Myers said.

As shouldn't surprise, the membership of the synagogue is split on this:

"I do not welcome this President to my city," Lynnette Lederman (a former president of the synagogue) told CNN's John Berman on "New Day" earlier Monday morning when asked about a letter from other Jewish leaders asking the President not to visit Pittsburgh.

These quotes can be found here:
https://www.cnn.com/2018/10/29/politics/tree-of-life-synagogue-president-trump-pittsburgh-shooting/index.html

And so we continue to have a problem with fake news...even from people with good intentions.  It makes one wonder a couple of things:  Who exactly is politicizing this tragedy?  What would be the reaction of a group previously hostile to President Obama had stated he was not welcome after a similar tragedy?  Perhaps a group or region who might have thought he was talking about them when said people cling bitterly to guns and religion.

Sterling Spatz

Thank you for posting this.   I can't help but wonder how their letter doesn't constitute inciting hatred.   One doesn't need to personally know Jewish people to understand that they are not a homogeneous people, most especially politically.  To be sure there is are liberal Jews in this country who voted for Hillary Clinton and have an uneasy relationship with Israel.  And there are conservative (not necessarily as to Judaism) Jews who have supported Trump's pro-israel stance.  Whether one agrees with Trump's actions viz. Israel how could one suggest that he has incited violence against Jews given his support of Israel.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Donald_Kirchner on October 29, 2018, 01:47:57 PM
Yes, such a letter certainly does not square with this, for example:

"Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu thanked US President Donald Trump on Sunday for his”unequivocal” response to a deadly attack on a Pittsburgh synagogue a day earlier...

He thanked Trump “for unequivocally condemning this heinous crime and for pledging to fight those who seek to destroy the Jewish people,” and praised the “clear condemnations” from American leaders across the political spectrum that have poured in since Saturday’s massacre.
 
“These statements are important. So too are actions that governments take to protect their citizens, whether that means providing security for vulnerable Jewish communities to passing tough laws against hate crimes,” Netanyahu wrote."

https://www.timesofisrael.com/netanyahu-thanks-trump-in-condolence-letter-to-pittsburgh-jews/
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Eileen Smith on October 29, 2018, 01:56:46 PM
This is the message I sent to the Concordia University Chicago community:

Concordia Family,

Today I write to you with a heavy heart. This past week has been marred by both threats of violence and horrifying acts of murder. Last week, an individual was arrested and charged with mailing bombs to high profile individuals. On Saturday, at Tree of Life Synagogue near Pittsburgh, eleven of our fellow citizens were brutally murdered because of their religion. These inhuman actions join a growing list of violent political acts and violent acts against houses of worship – Jewish, Islamic and Christian. Kyrie eleison! Lord have mercy!

On October 31, we will remember the 501st anniversary of the Reformation. It too was a time of both political and religious violence and hatred. Each generation is painfully reminded that, ever since Cain murdered his brother Abel in Genesis 4, our human race is not only sinful but violently sinful. Yet God has embraced our sinful world with love and even became victim to murderous human evil by sending His Son to be crucified by and in place of fallen humanity. Yet murderous evil, the outgrowth of human sin, could not defeat the power of divine love as Jesus rose from death on Easter.

Luther wrote in the Small Catechism about the 5th Commandment (“You shall not murder”) these words, “What does this mean? We should fear and love God so that we do not hurt or harm our neighbor in his body, but help and support him in every physical need. ” Please join me in prayer:

•   For the survivors and loved ones of the victims at Tree of Life Synagogue and the entire Pittsburgh community
•   For those that contemplate political or religious violence that God would turn their hearts to ways of peace
•   For law enforcement and first responders who risk their lives by heading toward the sound of gunfire
•   For ourselves that we not only never hurt or harm our neighbor but have the courage to help and support them in both words and deeds

May the God of peace grant us peace!

This is beautiful; thank you.  Will this be shared on Concordia's website? 
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Dan Fienen on October 29, 2018, 02:14:54 PM

Read an article by CNN columnist John Blake, "There's Scripture Backing Up Trump's Idea to Arm Houses of Worship" (http://www.kake.com/story/39373304/theres-scripture-backing-up-trumps-idea-to-arm-houses-of-worship).  Gives a thoughtful overview of opinion from religious leaders from both sides on the issue.  One interesting point was that pastors are called shepherds and part of the duty of a shepherd was to protect the sheep and part of the standard equipment of a shepherd was a long staff that could be used to fight off wolves that might attack the sheep.


Jesus' comments on swords, "live by the sword, die by the sword" and commanding his disciples to obtain swords, came in for attention also.


In all, it was a good discussion.  One point that I think needs special attention, that anyone, religious leader or congregant, who wants to be armed to protect the house of worship needs to be trained in the use of firearms for that purpose.  Just getting a gun and showing up with it without proper training can end up doing more harm than good.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: mariemeyer on October 29, 2018, 02:39:19 PM
The purpose of that post, Mrs. Meyer, is...?  Surely not to perpetuate the divisiveness!   :(

As stated, the post was for information and thought.  Before posting I went on line to learn more about Bend the ARC.  IMO the reference to the biblical message that every human being is made in the image of God prompted further thought.  I also thought the appeal for  "compassionate, democratic policies that recognize the dignity of all of us" was appropriate at this time. 


"The Torah teaches that every human being is made b’tzelem Elohim, in the image of God. This means all of us. "In our neighbors, Americans, and people worldwide who have reached out to give our community strength, there we find the image of God.  While we cannot speak for all Pittsburghers, or even all Jewish Pittsburghers, we know we speak for a diverse and unified group when we say:

President Trump, you are not welcome in Pittsburgh until you commit yourself to compassionate, democratic policies that recognize the dignity of all of us."

The above is a statement from one portion of the Jewish Community. I found it worth reading. 

Marie Meyer

 
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: John_Hannah on October 29, 2018, 02:39:46 PM
From our Brooklyn Borough President Adams:  https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/28/nyregion/eric-adams-brooklyn-guns.html

We have had armed police protection at our church at Easter for the last three years.  I supported our Precinct from the Christian side of the aisle after two imams were assassinated in the neighborhood last year, so that they have weekly police protection and higher protection on the main streets near their places of worship all the time. 

Borough President Adams has been invited and will most likely attend our Parish Hall Re-dedication ceremonies on November 11.  With his handgun. 

With an NYC/NYS licensed daycare center, our congregation must have surveillance cameras at exits/entrances, doors locked until access is given through security officer, and sign-in of all visitors.  These compliance steps are pretty much, to me, common sense methods to ensure the safety of children and staff.  They're not foolproof, but they have prevented what is usually parental visitation scuffles and violence, as well as unauthorized entrance.

Sunday is a different deal, however, with three doors open to the public from 9-2.  Which is two doors too many these days.  We must take these assaults on free worship seriously.

Dave Benke

The last time Coptic Christians were murdered in Egypt, the NYPD posted two officer at Our Saviour in the Bronx before, during, and after the time scheduled for their liturgy. No one requested that; it seemed to be part of the department's plan for response to world terror events. I was surprised that NYPD knew that the Coptic Christians regularly use our facility. There are no signs; the congregation relies on its own network of association.

Peace, JOHN
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Daniel L. Gard on October 29, 2018, 02:54:07 PM
This is the message I sent to the Concordia University Chicago community:

Concordia Family,

Today I write to you with a heavy heart. This past week has been marred by both threats of violence and horrifying acts of murder. Last week, an individual was arrested and charged with mailing bombs to high profile individuals. On Saturday, at Tree of Life Synagogue near Pittsburgh, eleven of our fellow citizens were brutally murdered because of their religion. These inhuman actions join a growing list of violent political acts and violent acts against houses of worship – Jewish, Islamic and Christian. Kyrie eleison! Lord have mercy!

On October 31, we will remember the 501st anniversary of the Reformation. It too was a time of both political and religious violence and hatred. Each generation is painfully reminded that, ever since Cain murdered his brother Abel in Genesis 4, our human race is not only sinful but violently sinful. Yet God has embraced our sinful world with love and even became victim to murderous human evil by sending His Son to be crucified by and in place of fallen humanity. Yet murderous evil, the outgrowth of human sin, could not defeat the power of divine love as Jesus rose from death on Easter.

Luther wrote in the Small Catechism about the 5th Commandment (“You shall not murder”) these words, “What does this mean? We should fear and love God so that we do not hurt or harm our neighbor in his body, but help and support him in every physical need. ” Please join me in prayer:

•   For the survivors and loved ones of the victims at Tree of Life Synagogue and the entire Pittsburgh community
•   For those that contemplate political or religious violence that God would turn their hearts to ways of peace
•   For law enforcement and first responders who risk their lives by heading toward the sound of gunfire
•   For ourselves that we not only never hurt or harm our neighbor but have the courage to help and support them in both words and deeds

May the God of peace grant us peace!

This is beautiful; thank you.  Will this be shared on Concordia's website?

Thank you. I occasionally (frequently?) send missives to our campus and most are not posted. Hopefully I can help students and others place all things within the context of God's love in Christ for all humanity.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: mariemeyer on October 30, 2018, 10:04:52 AM
The purpose of that post, Mrs. Meyer, is...?  Surely not to perpetuate the divisiveness!   :(

The above prompted me to question the wisdom of my posting on this Forum.  Perpetuating divisiveness has hardly been the purpose of my comments. Have I posted thoughts that do not reflect the majority of persons who post here?  Yes.  For that I make no apology. 

Today is an appropriate day for me to move on rejoicing at the birth of Bill and my first great-grandchild.

God's peace.

Your sister in Christ, Marie







Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Terry W Culler on October 30, 2018, 10:20:30 AM
Frankly most Antisemitism  in this country is found on college campuses and has its well spring in the ideas of the radical left.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Brian Stoffregen on October 30, 2018, 10:30:37 AM
Frankly most Antisemitism  in this country is found on college campuses and has its well spring in the ideas of the radical left.


Huh? Where does that come from? Being somewhat of a leftist and involved in inter-faith organizations, I have found many of the Jewish folks in such groups to be pretty liberal.


Of course, I could understand the Concordias, following the teachings of Martin Luther to be anti-semites but I would need to see studies that showed anti-semitism on secular college campuses.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Dan Fienen on October 30, 2018, 11:23:22 AM
Brian, could you offer some evidence of our Concordia University System promoting anti Semitism, or is it enough that they are conservative Lutheran to convict?
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Charles Austin on October 30, 2018, 11:46:03 AM
I would like to know if the LC-MS or any of its agencies, theologians, universities or other entities signed on to the 1994 declaration of the Lutheran World Federation (and most Lutheran churches around the world including the ELCA) rejecting Luther's writings on the Jews and apologizing for the damage done by them. Or maybe the LC-MS has another statement rejecting the vicious things Luther said about the Jews and the impact it had on following centuries. Is there such a thing?
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Brian Stoffregen on October 30, 2018, 11:54:01 AM
Brian, could you offer some evidence of our Concordia University System promoting anti Semitism, or is it enough that they are conservative Lutheran to convict?


It depends on how much of Luther's anti-semitism is retained by conservative Lutherans. Has the LCMS distanced themselves from Luther's anti-Judaic diatribes as the ELCA has done?


http://download.elca.org/ELCA%20Resource%20Repository/Declaration_Of_The_ELCA_To_The_Jewish_Community.pdf (http://download.elca.org/ELCA%20Resource%20Repository/Declaration_Of_The_ELCA_To_The_Jewish_Community.pdf)


We have seen in this forum some folks continue Luther's legacy of calling the pope the anti-christ.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Charles Austin on October 30, 2018, 11:54:18 AM
And I might say (note the "might" there) that if you have not, in any way possible, repudiated Luther's comments on the Jews and subsequent Lutheran anti-Semitism, then you are indeed culpable for what some are saying today.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Michael Slusser on October 30, 2018, 11:55:30 AM
Frankly most Antisemitism  in this country is found on college campuses and has its well spring in the ideas of the radical left.
Really? Most people in this country aren't found on college campuses! Are you referring to some study that says that antisemitism is directly proportional to higher education, or something to that effect? If so, I'd like to see it.

Peace,
Michael
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Dave Benke on October 30, 2018, 11:58:42 AM
I would like to know if the LC-MS or any of its agencies, theologians, universities or other entities signed on to the 1994 declaration of the Lutheran World Federation (and most Lutheran churches around the world including the ELCA) rejecting Luther's writings on the Jews and apologizing for the damage done by them. Or maybe the LC-MS has another statement rejecting the vicious things Luther said about the Jews and the impact it had on following centuries. Is there such a thing?

Dated in the 500th year of Luther's birth from the Missouri Synod:

Q: What is the Missouri Synod's response to the anti-Semitic statements made by Luther?
A: While The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod holds Martin Luther in high esteem for his bold
proclamation and clear articulation of the teachings of Scripture, it deeply regrets and deplores
statements made by Luther which express a negative and hostile attitude toward the Jews. In light of
the many positive and caring statements concerning the Jews made by Luther throughout his lifetime, it
would not be fair on the basis of these few regrettable (and uncharacteristic) negative statements, to
characterize the reformer as "a rabid anti-Semite." The LCMS, however, does not seek to "excuse" these
statements of Luther, but denounces them (without denouncing Luther's theology). In 1983, the Synod
adopted an official resolution addressing these statements of Luther and making clear its own position
on anti-Semitism. The text of this resolution reads as follows:
WHEREAS, Anti-Semitism and other forms of racism are a continuing problem in our world; and
WHEREAS, Some of Luther's intemperate remarks about the Jews are often cited in this connection; and
WHEREAS, It is widely but falsely assumed that Luther's personal writings and opinions have some
official status among us (thus, sometimes implying the responsibility of contemporary Lutheranism for
those statements, if not complicity in them); but also
WHEREAS, It is plain from scripture that the Gospel must be proclaimed to all people--that is, to Jews
also, no more and no less than to others (Matt. 28:18-20); and
WHEREAS, This Scriptural mandate is sometimes confused with anti-Semitism; therefore be it
Resolved, That we condemn any and all discrimination against others on account of race or religion or
any coercion on that account and pledge ourselves to work and witness against such sins; and be it
further
Resolved, That we reaffirm that the bases of our doctrine and practice are the Scriptures and the
Lutheran Confessions and not Luther, as such; and be it further
Resolved, That while, on the one hand, we are deeply indebted to Luther for his rediscovery and
enunciation of the Gospel, on the other hand, we deplore and disassociate ourselves from Luther's
negative statements about the Jewish people, and, by the same token, we deplore the use today of such
sentiments by Luther to incite anti-Christian and/or anti-Lutheran sentiment; and be it further
Resolved, That in our teaching and preaching we take care not to confuse the religion of the Old
Testament (often labeled "Yahwism") with the subsequent Judaism, nor misleadingly speak about
"Jews" in the Old Testament ("Israelites" or "Hebrews" being much more accurate terms), lest we
obscure the basic claim of the New Testament and of the Gospel to being in substantial continuity with
the Old Testament and that the fulfillment of the ancient promises came in Jesus Christ; and be it
further
Resolved, That we avoid the recurring pitfall of recrimination (as illustrated by the remarks of Luther and
many of the early church fathers) against those who do not respond positively to our evangelistic
efforts; and be it finally
Resolved, That, in that light, we personally and individually adopt Luther's final attitude toward the
Jewish people, as evidenced in his last sermon: "We want to treat them with Christian love and to pray
for them, so that they might become converted and would receive the Lord" (Weimar edition, Vol. 51, p.
195).


The same convention affirmed "Inter-Lutheran Cooperation in Social Ministry" (!).

Dave Benke
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Charles Austin on October 30, 2018, 12:08:26 PM
Thank you for that citation, Pastor/Bishop Benke. This humble correspondent will take issue with some of the language, but I think I can see how the statement was crafted, and I am glad it exists and can be cited in your circles.
I also refer everyone here to The Twisted Cross: The German Christian Movement in the Third Reich, by Doris Bergen. We were not a church of Bonhoeffers or Niemoellers. Lutherans for the most part supported the Nazi regime and allowed the state to dictate to the churches such things as removing all “Jewish” words from the liturgies and questioning the sincerity of anyone of Jewish descent who was a Christian. Many of the bishops of the “Deutsche Christen” state-dominated church were themselves members of the party. And many continued in office following the war.
I have also heard good things about Complicity in the Holocaust: Churches and Universities in Nazi Germany by Robert P. Erickson, but I have not read it.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Michael Slusser on October 30, 2018, 12:26:07 PM
Frankly most Antisemitism  in this country is found on college campuses and has its well spring in the ideas of the radical left.
Really? Most people in this country aren't found on college campuses! Are you referring to some study that says that antisemitism is directly proportional to higher education, or something to that effect? If so, I'd like to see it.

Peace,
Michael
A 2016 survey of attitudes by the Anti-Defamation League concluded
https://www.adl.org/sites/default/files/documents/ADL_MS_Survey_Pres_1_25_17.pdf (https://www.adl.org/sites/default/files/documents/ADL_MS_Survey_Pres_1_25_17.pdf)
Quote
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
ANTI-SEMITIC PROPENSITIES:  2016
The number of Americans who hold the most anti-Semitic propensities stands at 14 %.

Education remains a strong predictor of anti-Semitic propensities. The most well educated Americans are remarkably free of prejudicial views, while less educated Americans are more likely to hold anti-Semitic views.
That seems to be exactly opposite to what you assert, Pr. Culler.

Peace,
Michael
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Steven W Bohler on October 30, 2018, 12:36:41 PM
I would like to know if the LC-MS or any of its agencies, theologians, universities or other entities signed on to the 1994 declaration of the Lutheran World Federation (and most Lutheran churches around the world including the ELCA) rejecting Luther's writings on the Jews and apologizing for the damage done by them. Or maybe the LC-MS has another statement rejecting the vicious things Luther said about the Jews and the impact it had on following centuries. Is there such a thing?

Dated in the 500th year of Luther's birth from the Missouri Synod:

Q: What is the Missouri Synod's response to the anti-Semitic statements made by Luther?
A: While The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod holds Martin Luther in high esteem for his bold
proclamation and clear articulation of the teachings of Scripture, it deeply regrets and deplores
statements made by Luther which express a negative and hostile attitude toward the Jews. In light of
the many positive and caring statements concerning the Jews made by Luther throughout his lifetime, it
would not be fair on the basis of these few regrettable (and uncharacteristic) negative statements, to
characterize the reformer as "a rabid anti-Semite." The LCMS, however, does not seek to "excuse" these
statements of Luther, but denounces them (without denouncing Luther's theology). In 1983, the Synod
adopted an official resolution addressing these statements of Luther and making clear its own position
on anti-Semitism. The text of this resolution reads as follows:
WHEREAS, Anti-Semitism and other forms of racism are a continuing problem in our world; and
WHEREAS, Some of Luther's intemperate remarks about the Jews are often cited in this connection; and
WHEREAS, It is widely but falsely assumed that Luther's personal writings and opinions have some
official status among us (thus, sometimes implying the responsibility of contemporary Lutheranism for
those statements, if not complicity in them); but also
WHEREAS, It is plain from scripture that the Gospel must be proclaimed to all people--that is, to Jews
also, no more and no less than to others (Matt. 28:18-20); and
WHEREAS, This Scriptural mandate is sometimes confused with anti-Semitism; therefore be it
Resolved, That we condemn any and all discrimination against others on account of race or religion or
any coercion on that account and pledge ourselves to work and witness against such sins; and be it
further
Resolved, That we reaffirm that the bases of our doctrine and practice are the Scriptures and the
Lutheran Confessions and not Luther, as such; and be it further
Resolved, That while, on the one hand, we are deeply indebted to Luther for his rediscovery and
enunciation of the Gospel, on the other hand, we deplore and disassociate ourselves from Luther's
negative statements about the Jewish people, and, by the same token, we deplore the use today of such
sentiments by Luther to incite anti-Christian and/or anti-Lutheran sentiment; and be it further
Resolved, That in our teaching and preaching we take care not to confuse the religion of the Old
Testament (often labeled "Yahwism") with the subsequent Judaism, nor misleadingly speak about
"Jews" in the Old Testament ("Israelites" or "Hebrews" being much more accurate terms), lest we
obscure the basic claim of the New Testament and of the Gospel to being in substantial continuity with
the Old Testament and that the fulfillment of the ancient promises came in Jesus Christ; and be it
further
Resolved, That we avoid the recurring pitfall of recrimination (as illustrated by the remarks of Luther and
many of the early church fathers) against those who do not respond positively to our evangelistic
efforts; and be it finally
Resolved, That, in that light, we personally and individually adopt Luther's final attitude toward the
Jewish people, as evidenced in his last sermon: "We want to treat them with Christian love and to pray
for them, so that they might become converted and would receive the Lord" (Weimar edition, Vol. 51, p.
195).


The same convention affirmed "Inter-Lutheran Cooperation in Social Ministry" (!).

Dave Benke

Huh.  So, the LCMS was on record as repudiating Luther's anti-Semitism.  More than 10 years before the statement signed by the ELCA.  Does that mean the ELCA were anti-Semites longer than the LCMS?  Because, as we all know, until such things are formally rejected we are automatically guilty of them.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: SomeoneWrites on October 30, 2018, 12:50:17 PM
I would like to know if the LC-MS....


LCMS

Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Dan Fienen on October 30, 2018, 01:13:22 PM

Yes, but you have to understand that such a statement cannot be real until the LWF makes it.  Our statement wasn't official because we weren't a part of the LWF.


In addition to the official German Lutheran church that collaborated with the Nazis, there was the confessing Lutheran church that opposed the Nazis and often paid dearly for that opposition.  Does anyone know the pedigrees of the various current Lutheran churches in Germany and whether or not they derived from the official Nazi era church or the opposition confessing church?
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Dave Benke on October 30, 2018, 01:33:05 PM
I would like to know if the LC-MS or any of its agencies, theologians, universities or other entities signed on to the 1994 declaration of the Lutheran World Federation (and most Lutheran churches around the world including the ELCA) rejecting Luther's writings on the Jews and apologizing for the damage done by them. Or maybe the LC-MS has another statement rejecting the vicious things Luther said about the Jews and the impact it had on following centuries. Is there such a thing?

Dated in the 500th year of Luther's birth from the Missouri Synod:

Q: What is the Missouri Synod's response to the anti-Semitic statements made by Luther?
A: While The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod holds Martin Luther in high esteem for his bold
proclamation and clear articulation of the teachings of Scripture, it deeply regrets and deplores
statements made by Luther which express a negative and hostile attitude toward the Jews. In light of
the many positive and caring statements concerning the Jews made by Luther throughout his lifetime, it
would not be fair on the basis of these few regrettable (and uncharacteristic) negative statements, to
characterize the reformer as "a rabid anti-Semite." The LCMS, however, does not seek to "excuse" these
statements of Luther, but denounces them (without denouncing Luther's theology). In 1983, the Synod
adopted an official resolution addressing these statements of Luther and making clear its own position
on anti-Semitism. The text of this resolution reads as follows:
WHEREAS, Anti-Semitism and other forms of racism are a continuing problem in our world; and
WHEREAS, Some of Luther's intemperate remarks about the Jews are often cited in this connection; and
WHEREAS, It is widely but falsely assumed that Luther's personal writings and opinions have some
official status among us (thus, sometimes implying the responsibility of contemporary Lutheranism for
those statements, if not complicity in them); but also
WHEREAS, It is plain from scripture that the Gospel must be proclaimed to all people--that is, to Jews
also, no more and no less than to others (Matt. 28:18-20); and
WHEREAS, This Scriptural mandate is sometimes confused with anti-Semitism; therefore be it
Resolved, That we condemn any and all discrimination against others on account of race or religion or
any coercion on that account and pledge ourselves to work and witness against such sins; and be it
further
Resolved, That we reaffirm that the bases of our doctrine and practice are the Scriptures and the
Lutheran Confessions and not Luther, as such; and be it further
Resolved, That while, on the one hand, we are deeply indebted to Luther for his rediscovery and
enunciation of the Gospel, on the other hand, we deplore and disassociate ourselves from Luther's
negative statements about the Jewish people, and, by the same token, we deplore the use today of such
sentiments by Luther to incite anti-Christian and/or anti-Lutheran sentiment; and be it further
Resolved, That in our teaching and preaching we take care not to confuse the religion of the Old
Testament (often labeled "Yahwism") with the subsequent Judaism, nor misleadingly speak about
"Jews" in the Old Testament ("Israelites" or "Hebrews" being much more accurate terms), lest we
obscure the basic claim of the New Testament and of the Gospel to being in substantial continuity with
the Old Testament and that the fulfillment of the ancient promises came in Jesus Christ; and be it
further
Resolved, That we avoid the recurring pitfall of recrimination (as illustrated by the remarks of Luther and
many of the early church fathers) against those who do not respond positively to our evangelistic
efforts; and be it finally
Resolved, That, in that light, we personally and individually adopt Luther's final attitude toward the
Jewish people, as evidenced in his last sermon: "We want to treat them with Christian love and to pray
for them, so that they might become converted and would receive the Lord" (Weimar edition, Vol. 51, p.
195).


The same convention affirmed "Inter-Lutheran Cooperation in Social Ministry" (!).

Dave Benke

Huh.  So, the LCMS was on record as repudiating Luther's anti-Semitism.  More than 10 years before the statement signed by the ELCA.  Does that mean the ELCA were anti-Semites longer than the LCMS?  Because, as we all know, until such things are formally rejected we are automatically guilty of them.

a) There was no ELCA in 1983.  I suppose in some wayback machine or other the statements of the ALC and LCA could be uncovered.  It might be that, since the three Lutheran entities were cooperating a lot more at the time that there was a coordinated effort to come up with statements or resolutions like this on the 500th anniversary of Luther's birth. 

b) Luther's birth date was specifically utilized by the Nazi regime (including the Bishop of Saxony at the time) as the evening of Kristallnacht, when the old instructions of Luther's fomenting (burn their synagogues, etc.) were implemented purposefully to connect Luther as an authorizer of Anti-Semitism.  The LCMS resolution points this out even as it denounces those statements of Luther.

I'm happy to bring this resolution to light at this specific time, and as you indicate, it is useful in our LCMS circles.

Dave Benke
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Charles Austin on October 30, 2018, 03:16:43 PM
A statement from the Lutheran Council, USA, was issued in 1971, at a time on the LCMS was part of the Lutheran council.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Daniel L. Gard on October 30, 2018, 04:13:37 PM

Of course, I could understand the Concordias, following the teachings of Martin Luther to be anti-semites but I would need to see studies that showed anti-semitism on secular college campuses.

You may not be familiar with confessional subscription. The LCMS unconditionally subscribes to the Book of Concord. The other writings of Luther are not included. Pr. Benke has downstream provided the LCMS response to Luther's troubling private writings.

When it comes to the LCMS, I am curious about something. Is insulting us (including the Concordias) something you work at or is it a gift that you have?
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Steven W Bohler on October 30, 2018, 04:15:58 PM
A statement from the Lutheran Council, USA, was issued in 1971, at a time on the LCMS was part of the Lutheran council.

So, why were you insinuating that the LCMS had not repudiated Luther's anti-Semitism by not signing the LWF document?
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: John_Hannah on October 30, 2018, 04:18:27 PM
A statement from the Lutheran Council, USA, was issued in 1971, at a time on the LCMS was part of the Lutheran council.

It seems to me that there have been at least 100 disclaimers of "Luther on the Jews" by every kind of American Lutheran ever created by God or man over these last 30-40 years. It should be clear to anyone concerned.

Peace, JOHN
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Dan Fienen on October 30, 2018, 04:47:32 PM
Pot shots at the LCMS, and assumptions that there is no decency about the typical LCMS person (holdovers from the Seminex period excepted) are a reflex action.  Of course we must buy into Luther's anti-Semitic rants, we're LCMS, we're conservative so it just follows, no evidence required.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Daniel L. Gard on October 30, 2018, 05:25:58 PM
Close to our campus is Temple Har Zion, a conservative synagogue. We have a long history of being good neighbors.

Following the Tree of Life Synagogue tragedy, a senior University administrator and I paid a visit to our neighbors. Like all Jewish communities, they grieve the murders of human beings in Squirrel Hill. Yet they are keenly aware of their own vulnerability and the ever present shadow of antisemitism even in this affluent neighborhood.

I would urge others to visit their local synagogue and express your compassion and concern for them. The events of last Saturday affect our Jewish neighbors in profound ways no matter how far they are from the events of Saturday. They are our fellow citizens and an attack on them is an attack on all religious communities. I know that if a murderer slaughtered people in a Lutheran parish, the Rabbi and Kantor at Temple Har Zion would be over here to support us.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: mj4 on October 30, 2018, 05:45:10 PM
Brian, could you offer some evidence of our Concordia University System promoting anti Semitism, or is it enough that they are conservative Lutheran to convict?


It depends on how much of Luther's anti-semitism is retained by conservative Lutherans. Has the LCMS distanced themselves from Luther's anti-Judaic diatribes as the ELCA has done?


http://download.elca.org/ELCA%20Resource%20Repository/Declaration_Of_The_ELCA_To_The_Jewish_Community.pdf (http://download.elca.org/ELCA%20Resource%20Repository/Declaration_Of_The_ELCA_To_The_Jewish_Community.pdf)


We have seen in this forum some folks continue Luther's legacy of calling the pope the anti-christ.

Before we in the ELCA climb up onto our high horse, we should acknowledge that we are not uniformly regarded in the Jewish community. The anti-Jewish statements of Luther have been rejected, but our one-sided approach to the Israeli/Palestinian conflict is a source of consternation for many in the Jewish community. Is the decidedly pro-Palestinian leaning of the ELCA another form of anti-semitism? It is certainly viewed that way by some.

https://www.newsweek.com/why-are-lutherans-attacking-israel-again-491119 (https://www.newsweek.com/why-are-lutherans-attacking-israel-again-491119)
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Daniel L. Gard on October 30, 2018, 05:50:43 PM
Brian, could you offer some evidence of our Concordia University System promoting anti Semitism, or is it enough that they are conservative Lutheran to convict?


It depends on how much of Luther's anti-semitism is retained by conservative Lutherans. Has the LCMS distanced themselves from Luther's anti-Judaic diatribes as the ELCA has done?


http://download.elca.org/ELCA%20Resource%20Repository/Declaration_Of_The_ELCA_To_The_Jewish_Community.pdf (http://download.elca.org/ELCA%20Resource%20Repository/Declaration_Of_The_ELCA_To_The_Jewish_Community.pdf)


We have seen in this forum some folks continue Luther's legacy of calling the pope the anti-christ.

Before we in the ELCA climb up onto our high horse, we should acknowledge that we are not uniformly regarded in the Jewish community. The anti-Jewish statements of Luther have been rejected, but our one-sided approach to the Israeli/Palestinian conflict is a source of consternation for many in the Jewish community. Is the decidedly pro-Palestinian leaning of the ELCA another form of anti-semitism? It is certainly viewed that way by some.

https://www.newsweek.com/why-are-lutherans-attacking-israel-again-491119 (https://www.newsweek.com/why-are-lutherans-attacking-israel-again-491119)

I have been in the uncomfortable position of having to explain that the ELCA and the LCMS are not the same Lutherans.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Charles Austin on October 30, 2018, 06:06:54 PM
Would you guys relax? I am implying  nothing about the LCMS; I was asking a question. And when they were answered, I commended you.
There is no pot shot; there is no suggestion that you are buying into Luther’s rants.
And let it be noted , that some of the criticism aimed at the ELCA in Recent years has to do with our criticism of Israel, which is something quite different. Being critical of Israel’s policy is not being anti-Semitic, although Some contend that it is. That is nonesense.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Charles Austin on October 30, 2018, 06:09:42 PM
Dr. Gard writes:
I have been in the uncomfortable position of having to explain that the ELCA and the LCMS are not the same Lutherans.
I comment:
Me, too.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Daniel L. Gard on October 30, 2018, 06:18:54 PM
Dr. Gard writes:
I have been in the uncomfortable position of having to explain that the ELCA and the LCMS are not the same Lutherans.
I comment:
Me, too.

No doubt. But for very different reasons.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Brian Stoffregen on October 30, 2018, 06:50:03 PM

Of course, I could understand the Concordias, following the teachings of Martin Luther to be anti-semites but I would need to see studies that showed anti-semitism on secular college campuses.

You may not be familiar with confessional subscription. The LCMS unconditionally subscribes to the Book of Concord. The other writings of Luther are not included. Pr. Benke has downstream provided the LCMS response to Luther's troubling private writings.

When it comes to the LCMS, I am curious about something. Is insulting us (including the Concordias) something you work at or is it a gift that you have?


Having read what some have written about me and the ELCA and the pope and Roman Catholics, sometimes lex talionis happens.


Remember, I'm a product of the Concordias - an AA from Concordia Jr College, Portland. That's also where I met my wife of 47 years. Although, I've argued that the LCMS of 1969-1971 when I attended Concordia was a different church than it is today.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: mj4 on October 30, 2018, 06:57:17 PM
Being critical of Israel’s policy is not being anti-Semitic, although Some contend that it is. That is nonesense.

In order to dissuade the critics, you’ll need to explain why of all the nations of the world in some sort of conflict, the ELCA has singled out Israel for censure. Feel free to start another thread.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Daniel L. Gard on October 30, 2018, 07:14:24 PM


Remember, I'm a product of the Concordias - an AA from Concordia Jr College, Portland. That's also where I met my wife of 47 years. Although, I've argued that the LCMS of 1969-1971 when I attended Concordia was a different church than it is today.

Remember also that I am the product of a LCA college (now ELCA): Carthage College, B.A. 1975. I know that the LCA was a different church than the ELCA is today. Thus, I would not assume that my experiences over 40 years ago at Carthage should in any way shape my view of the ELCA in 2018.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Dan Fienen on October 30, 2018, 07:19:30 PM

Of course, I could understand the Concordias, following the teachings of Martin Luther to be anti-semites but I would need to see studies that showed anti-semitism on secular college campuses.

You may not be familiar with confessional subscription. The LCMS unconditionally subscribes to the Book of Concord. The other writings of Luther are not included. Pr. Benke has downstream provided the LCMS response to Luther's troubling private writings.

When it comes to the LCMS, I am curious about something. Is insulting us (including the Concordias) something you work at or is it a gift that you have?


Having read what some have written about me and the ELCA and the pope and Roman Catholics, sometimes lex talionis happens.


Remember, I'm a product of the Concordias - an AA from Concordia Jr College, Portland. That's also where I met my wife of 47 years. Although, I've argued that the LCMS of 1969-1971 when I attended Concordia was a different church than it is today.
Did you notice endemic anti-Semitism at Portland as a student?  I do note that you seem willing to believe that current Concordias foster anti-Semitism without needing evidence.  But in the case of secular campuses you’d solid evidence to credit that.  Prejudiced any?
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Daniel L. Gard on October 30, 2018, 07:29:25 PM

Of course, I could understand the Concordias, following the teachings of Martin Luther to be anti-semites but I would need to see studies that showed anti-semitism on secular college campuses.

You may not be familiar with confessional subscription. The LCMS unconditionally subscribes to the Book of Concord. The other writings of Luther are not included. Pr. Benke has downstream provided the LCMS response to Luther's troubling private writings.

When it comes to the LCMS, I am curious about something. Is insulting us (including the Concordias) something you work at or is it a gift that you have?


Having read what some have written about me and the ELCA and the pope and Roman Catholics, sometimes lex talionis happens.


Remember, I'm a product of the Concordias - an AA from Concordia Jr College, Portland. That's also where I met my wife of 47 years. Although, I've argued that the LCMS of 1969-1971 when I attended Concordia was a different church than it is today.
Did you notice endemic anti-Semitism at Portland as a student?  I do note that you seem willing to believe that current Concordias foster anti-Semitism without needing evidence.  But in the case of secular campuses you’d solid evidence to credit that.  Prejudiced any?

The amazing thing is that he cannot recognize his own bigotry towards the LCMS. His expertise comes from two years at Portland nearly 50 years ago.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Dan Fienen on October 30, 2018, 07:33:53 PM
I have noticed that those two years, an unfortunate incident that her wife experienced and a number of disgruntled former visitors and members from a local  LCMS congregation has made him our resident LCMS expert, he knows the LCMS much better than those of us who’ve lived our entire lives in the LCMS.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: J.L. Precup on October 30, 2018, 07:53:06 PM
Close to our campus is Temple Har Zion, a conservative synagogue. We have a long history of being good neighbors.

Following the Tree of Life Synagogue tragedy, a senior University administrator and I paid a visit to our neighbors. Like all Jewish communities, they grieve the murders of human beings in Squirrel Hill. Yet they are keenly aware of their own vulnerability and the ever present shadow of antisemitism even in this affluent neighborhood.

I would urge others to visit their local synagogue and express your compassion and concern for them. The events of last Saturday affect our Jewish neighbors in profound ways no matter how far they are from the events of Saturday. They are our fellow citizens and an attack on them is an attack on all religious communities. I know that if a murderer slaughtered people in a Lutheran parish, the Rabbi and Kantor at Temple Har Zion would be over here to support us.

If this is the temple I am remembering, it has the words of Zechariah carved over the entrance for all the world to see:  Not by might, nor by power, but by my spirit, says the Lord of hosts.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Daniel L. Gard on October 30, 2018, 07:57:14 PM
Close to our campus is Temple Har Zion, a conservative synagogue. We have a long history of being good neighbors.

Following the Tree of Life Synagogue tragedy, a senior University administrator and I paid a visit to our neighbors. Like all Jewish communities, they grieve the murders of human beings in Squirrel Hill. Yet they are keenly aware of their own vulnerability and the ever present shadow of antisemitism even in this affluent neighborhood.

I would urge others to visit their local synagogue and express your compassion and concern for them. The events of last Saturday affect our Jewish neighbors in profound ways no matter how far they are from the events of Saturday. They are our fellow citizens and an attack on them is an attack on all religious communities. I know that if a murderer slaughtered people in a Lutheran parish, the Rabbi and Kantor at Temple Har Zion would be over here to support us.

If this is the temple I am remembering, it has the words of Zechariah carved over the entrance for all the world to see:  Not by might, nor by power, but by my spirit, says the Lord of hosts.

It does indeed.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Richard Johnson on October 30, 2018, 08:03:25 PM
I wonder what it says about us that a thread entitled "Care of our Jewish Neighbors" so quickly degenerated into the usual brick sniping at one another across church body lines?
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Brian Stoffregen on October 30, 2018, 08:05:41 PM

Of course, I could understand the Concordias, following the teachings of Martin Luther to be anti-semites but I would need to see studies that showed anti-semitism on secular college campuses.

You may not be familiar with confessional subscription. The LCMS unconditionally subscribes to the Book of Concord. The other writings of Luther are not included. Pr. Benke has downstream provided the LCMS response to Luther's troubling private writings.

When it comes to the LCMS, I am curious about something. Is insulting us (including the Concordias) something you work at or is it a gift that you have?


Having read what some have written about me and the ELCA and the pope and Roman Catholics, sometimes lex talionis happens.


Remember, I'm a product of the Concordias - an AA from Concordia Jr College, Portland. That's also where I met my wife of 47 years. Although, I've argued that the LCMS of 1969-1971 when I attended Concordia was a different church than it is today.
Did you notice endemic anti-Semitism at Portland as a student?  I do note that you seem willing to believe that current Concordias foster anti-Semitism without needing evidence.  But in the case of secular campuses you’d solid evidence to credit that.  Prejudiced any?


The secular schools do not have the connection with the anti-semitic Martin Luther like the Concordias do.


No, I did not notice anti-Semitism at Portland (and I am half Jewish). I also did not notice an anti-ALC bias at Portland (and I was ALC). We were in fellowship at the time. Do I experience an anti-ELCA bias now? From some, but not all LCMS folks.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Daniel L. Gard on October 30, 2018, 08:08:42 PM
I wonder what it says about us that a thread entitled "Care of our Jewish Neighbors" so quickly degenerated into the usual brick sniping at one another across church body lines?

You are right. I took the bait and I apologize. I should know better.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Brian Stoffregen on October 30, 2018, 08:15:38 PM
I have noticed that those two years, an unfortunate incident that her wife experienced and a number of disgruntled former visitors and members from a local  LCMS congregation has made him our resident LCMS expert, he knows the LCMS much better than those of us who’ve lived our entire lives in the LCMS.


You forgot the regular conversations with LCMS clergy friends - who were also quite saddened by the change they had seen in their LCMS. (Of course, they were trained and ordained prior to the "split" - so they were trained by those professors who were deemed questionable.) In fact, we had an LCMS clergy over for dinner a few months ago.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Daniel L. Gard on October 30, 2018, 08:20:35 PM
I have noticed that those two years, an unfortunate incident that her wife experienced and a number of disgruntled former visitors and members from a local  LCMS congregation has made him our resident LCMS expert, he knows the LCMS much better than those of us who’ve lived our entire lives in the LCMS.


You forgot the regular conversations with LCMS clergy friends - who were also quite saddened by the change they had seen in their LCMS. (Of course, they were trained and ordained prior to the "split" - so they were trained by those professors who were deemed questionable.) In fact, we had an LCMS clergy over for dinner a few months ago.

As our moderator reminds us, this thread is about "care of our Jewish neighbors."  I suggest you start a different thread for yet another ELCA/LCMS debate.

I am more curious about how others think we Lutherans can care for our Jewish neighbors than I am interested in rehashing constant antagonisms between those who claim to be Lutheran.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: pearson on October 30, 2018, 09:37:49 PM

I am more curious about how others think we Lutherans can care for our Jewish neighbors I am interested in rehashing constant antagonisms between those who claim to be Lutheran.


I went to our granddaughters' public high school today to speak with their counselor (they're traveling and studying with us when I teach overseas next summer).  I turned the corner to go down a hallway and passed the open area of the cafeteria.  Hanging from the ceiling in front of the cafeteria was a large sign that quoted that Zecharaiah 4:6 passage, along with a painted message: "We love and pray for our Jewish friends."  At least I think it was the passage from Zechariah that was quoted; I was so gratified to see a scripture passage publicly displayed in a public high school that I'm not sure I paid close attention to the text itself.  But I think that was it.  And I pretty quickly felt I wanted to take that entire student body with me next summer.

Tom Pearson
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Michael Slusser on October 30, 2018, 11:13:35 PM
In the RCC Lectionary for Sunday, Nov. 4, the Gospel is Mark 12:28b-34, in which Jesus says that the Shema is the first of all the commandments. I plan to point out that Jesus probably said it every day, as observant Jews do even now, and go from there into solidarity, the profound sharing we have in belief in the one God, and so on.

I lived 16 years in Squirrel Hill, and the lady next door served three terms as president of New Light congregation, one of the three that was shot up last Sabbath. I dread the possibility that the shooter might turn out to have been a Catholic.

Peace,
Michael
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Steven Tibbetts on October 31, 2018, 01:11:43 AM
I wonder what it says about us that a thread entitled "Care of our Jewish Neighbors" so quickly degenerated into the usual brick sniping at one another across church body lines?

And notice who launched that (https://alpb.org/Forum/index.php?topic=7097.msg452547#msg452547) train of thought.

 >:(
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Charles Austin on October 31, 2018, 04:49:02 AM
No, Steven, you are wrong.
The tone of this thread has an interesting history. Please observe.
   The drift began in Post #5, when Pastor Kirchner sniped at President Obama’s reference to how easy it is to get guns.That was immediately seconded by the Anonymous One.
   The next day, Pastor Kirchner lifted up a story about a man carrying a gun in a McDonalds who took down a masked shooter.
  So a temporary drift was immediately towards the gun issue, and started by Pastor Kirchner and the Anonymous One.
   Marie cited a response to the president visiting Pittsburgh and that was immediately blasted by Pastor Fienen who accused her of blaming all divisiveness on Trump (which she did not do). And Marie wonders again publicly why she even posts here.
   My simple question about LCMS statements opposing anti-Semitism was posted yesterday at 10:46 a.m. And it was only yesterday that Pastor Stoffregen wondered whether Luther’s influence on the Concordia campuses led to unpleasant things.
   Then I asked whether the LCMS had signed on to the LWF statement apologizing for Luther’s words. Brian asked the same question in a different way. Dave Benke posted the LCMS statement and I thanked him and commended the LCMS for the statement.
   Pastor Bohler posted – 20 minutes after my commendation of the LCMS – a snarky statement about the ELCA, and a few minutes after that Pastor Fienen posted a sarcastic shot: “…but you have to understand that such a statement cannot be real until the LWF makes it.  Our statement wasn't official because we weren't a part of the LWF.” (And no one had said or implied that.)
   I followed up with a reference to a Lutheran Council (U.S.A.) document on anti-Semitism that had involved the LCMS and Pastor Bohler jumped in again saying “So, why were you insinuating that the LCMS had not repudiated Luther's anti-Semitism by not signing the LWF document?” (And I had not insinuated that, and I posted the Lutheran Council reference as soon as I found it.)
   Then comes Pastor Fienen again - out of nowhere: “Pot shots at the LCMS, and assumptions that there is no decency about the typical LCMS person (holdovers from the Seminex period excepted) are a reflex action. Of course we must buy into Luther's anti-Semitic rants, we're LCMS, we're conservative so it just follows, no evidence required.”
   Therefore textual evidence shows that the thread drift towards what Richard called “sniping at one another across church body lines” did not begin with Brian, but with the usual edginess of certain LCMS posters who seem to like to say how “persecuted” they are by ELCA people here, even when the ELCA people her have not said anything about them and with the early on float-up of the issue of guns and who can get them, a favorite of certain ones here.
   So I fear the tone of the thread was muddied and honest concern for our Jewish neighbors completely lost in that frequent dynamic, which - I note again - did not begin with the ELCA posters here. (Although someone will now say that it did.)
   And then the discussion will morph intro sexuality and ordination for women, unless the Anonymous One, who favors guns, decides to take it that direction.
   BTW, Dr. Gard's postings here have been enlightening and helpful.


Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Donald_Kirchner on October 31, 2018, 07:19:45 AM

   The drift began in Post #5, when Pastor Kirchner sniped at President Obama’s reference to how easy it is to get guns.That was immediately seconded by the Anonymous One.
   The next day, Pastor Kirchner lifted up a story about a man carrying a gun in a McDonalds who took down a masked shooter.
  So a temporary drift was immediately towards the gun issue, and started by Pastor Kirchner and the Anonymous One.

Flummery.

The "gun issue," relevant to "Israel's recent response to terrorism" versus Obama's view and public comment after the Pittsburgh attack certainly did not initiate "the usual brick sniping at one another across church body lines."


Israel's recent response to terrorism was to make it easier for good guys to carry guns:

Quote from: Israel's Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan (https://www.breakingisraelnews.com/112770/israeli-gun-law-reform-passes/)
Many citizens have saved lives during terror attacks, and in the era of ‘lone-wolf’ attacks, the more qualified gun-carrying citizens there are, the better the chance to stop terror attacks without casualties and reduce the number of casualties.

Contrast this with Obama's comment on the Pittsburgh attack. "And we have to stop making it so easy for those who want to harm the innocent to get their hands on m a gun."

How you conclude that "a temporary drift was immediately towards the gun issue" [emphasis in original] initiates "the usual brick sniping at one another across church body lines" is puzzling.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Terry W Culler on October 31, 2018, 09:00:12 AM
Frankly most Antisemitism  in this country is found on college campuses and has its well spring in the ideas of the radical left.
Really? Most people in this country aren't found on college campuses! Are you referring to some study that says that antisemitism is directly proportional to higher education, or something to that effect? If so, I'd like to see it.

Peace,
Michael

The word "most" is possibly hyperbole.  But if you Google antisemitism in American universities you get a number of articles from the ADL, USA Today, etc. on this issue.  It frequently appears in relation to Israel, but the anti-Israel oratory quickly degenerates into antisemitism.  In one university male Jewish students were advised to wear hats over their yarmulkes.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Charles Austin on October 31, 2018, 09:02:26 AM
Read the whole posting, Pastor Kirchner. The gun issue was a temporary drift, the sniping at church bodies drift came later and it’s documented as to how it began.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Donald_Kirchner on October 31, 2018, 09:06:52 AM
Read the whole posting, Pastor Kirchner. The gun issue was a temporary drift, the sniping at church bodies drift came later and it’s documented as to how it began.

Agreed, the latter as documented by Pastor Tibbetts.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Charles Austin on October 31, 2018, 10:28:12 AM
No, Steven attributed the drift to one direction, when a reading of the postings shows the drift came from another direction.
Carry on.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Dan Fienen on October 31, 2018, 10:43:08 AM

The ease and rapidity with which this thread devolved into internecine snipping and sniping is illustrative of the human tendency to mark others who are different as the "other" presumed untrustworthy, degenerate, even dangerous.  This tendency is further marked by quick defensiveness that would assure any and all that it is not me and my group that started it, it is those others who started it, I'm only defending me and mine.  Meanwhile there is a quickness to take offense even at what objectively speaking appear to be innocent comments and questions, as well as passive aggressive snipes couched to appear as simple questions or comments but hiding a subtle attack.


The roots of anti-Semitism are many and deep.  Much more often than not it is planted and nurtured by the psychological, political and economic needs of those who turn against the Jews than any action of the Jews themselves.  Historically they have been much more often sinned against than sinning.  Partly that has been because they are much more likely to lack the power to do unto others.  Current controversies over the actions of the State of Israel over against their neighbors show that the shoe can at times be on the other foot.  They are human, with all the glory that human can be as well as the shadows and mud.  Nobody's hand are completely clean. 


It is a very wise and gracious person who can discern his or her own faults while still defending against the unjust accusations of others.  It is also a wise and gracious person who can recognize how his or her own comments could be understood as attacks even when not intended to be so, and to recognize one's own subconscious urge to attack under the guise of simple observations. 


One of the unfortunate effects of the acrimonious climate of these times is that just about all people have become hyper sensitive to jabs and gibes even when they are not intended.  But that is also an effect of coming out of a climate where basic racist, sexist and other "-ist" attitudes and assumptions have been so ubiquitous as to go almost unnoticed.  People may not even realize that their speech and attitudes reflect ingrained offensive stereotypes.  We all need to carefully watch that we do not take offense where none was intended, or give offense even subconsciously.  We also, all of us need, to be open to having offensive  assumptions pointed out.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Dan Fienen on October 31, 2018, 10:44:20 AM
No, Steven attributed the drift to one direction, when a reading of the postings shows the drift came from another direction.
Carry on.

Actually, I suggest that the drift came from all directions.
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Michael Slusser on October 31, 2018, 10:53:09 AM
Frankly most Antisemitism  in this country is found on college campuses and has its well spring in the ideas of the radical left.
Really? Most people in this country aren't found on college campuses! Are you referring to some study that says that antisemitism is directly proportional to higher education, or something to that effect? If so, I'd like to see it.

The word "most" is possibly hyperbole.  But if you Google antisemitism in American universities you get a number of articles from the ADL, USA Today, etc. on this issue.  It frequently appears in relation to Israel, but the anti-Israel oratory quickly degenerates into antisemitism.  In one university male Jewish students were advised to wear hats over their yarmulkes.
The ADL confirms your observation that in 2017 incidents increased on campus faster than in the nation as a whole ("Meanwhile, college campuses saw a total of 204 incidents in 2017, compared to 108 in 2016") but overall, the increase was nearly 60%.
https://www.adl.org/news/press-releases/anti-semitic-incidents-surged-nearly-60-in-2017-according-to-new-adl-report (https://www.adl.org/news/press-releases/anti-semitic-incidents-surged-nearly-60-in-2017-according-to-new-adl-report)
A more recent (Oct. 2018) report that covers the digital world says, in its conclusions,
Quote
The online public sphere—now a primary arena for
communication about American politics— has become
progressively unhospitable for Jewish Americans. Prior
to the election of President Donald Trump, anti-Semitic
harassment and attacks were rare and unexpected, even
for Jewish Americans who were prominently situated in
the public eye. Following his election, anti-Semitism has
become normalized and harassment is a daily occurrence.
The harassment, deeply rooted in age-old conspiracies such
as the New World Order, which alleges that an evil cabal of
Jewish people have taken autocratic control of the globe, and
Holocaust imagery—faces placed inside Nazi concentration
camp ovens or stretched on lampshades—shows no signs
of abating.
https://www.adl.org/media/12028/download (https://www.adl.org/media/12028/download)

Peace,
Michael
Title: Re: Care of our Jewish Neighbors
Post by: Eileen Smith on October 31, 2018, 11:25:51 AM
We had an interfaith service in town on Wednesday night at the conservative synagogue, Shomrei Torah.  We have a wonderful relationship with this congregation, especially through our Pastor who enjoys a friendship with the rabbi.  Rabbi Mark (last name) has come to our Prime Timers and has offered a Jewish perspective on familiar Old Testament passages while my Pastor then offers a Lutheran perspective.  We work together closely in the Wayne Interfaith Network Food Pantry, and enjoy other Interfaith activities. 

As usual, in providing some background, I digress.  The service was attended by an estimated 700 people and I pray that helped our two Wayne synagogues feel the care and support of the community.  There is a link below.  I'll admit it does tend to stall.  My Pastor spoke and comes in at about the 34-35 minute mark.  However, at least on my laptop, it seems to stall a few moments into his remarks.  One member of the synagogue. commented, "It is gatherings such as this that give me hope."

https://patch.com/new-jersey/wayne/wayne-comes-together-remember-pittsburgh-victims-watch?utm_term=article-slot-1&utm_source=newsletter-daily&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter (https://patch.com/new-jersey/wayne/wayne-comes-together-remember-pittsburgh-victims-watch?utm_term=article-slot-1&utm_source=newsletter-daily&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter)

How do we offer care as Lutherans ... as neighbors.  I have found a simple phone call or email offering sympathy is welcome.  With a friend or even local rabbi, perhaps a gift of fruit or some other appropriate gift just as one might bring to a Shiva.  I plan to bring something to a doctor I'll see this week.   Keeping with the title of this thread, I would be interested to learn of interfaith activities that some of you may have participated in or expressions of care as Dr. Gard shared.   In the present day climate this may not, unfortunately, be a single instance of needing to offer care, indeed, we have had far too many opportunities.  It is good to learn from one another.