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ALPB => Your Turn => Topic started by: David Garner on February 21, 2013, 02:19:15 PM

Title: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on February 21, 2013, 02:19:15 PM
Hoping this will meet with some interest.  As some of you may know, I play guitar in a local band.  This thread is to discuss interests in guitar, gear, and related fun stuff.

My main guitar is my 40th birthday present -- an Eric Johnson Signature Stratocaster, and while I currently gig with a Mesa Express 5:50, my heart is still with my Deluxe Reverb clone that sadly stays upstairs and doesn't get nearly as much love as it deserves.  I also have a nice Taylor acoustic that I tried and tried to talk myself out of (because I wanted a Martin) and in the end just couldn't.  It just played nicer than anything else I put my hands on, and was less expensive than the Martin and had onboard electronics.

I still play my old Telecaster more than the others, primarily because it's what I usually have with me for rehearsal (I don't like to leave the Strat in the car).
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: Coach-Rev on February 21, 2013, 02:51:43 PM
I have an Alvarez that sees the light of day perhaps twice a year.  Like the band "REM," I know 3 chords well.  So I'm probably not the best one to participate in this discussion.  I'll probably be a frequent lurker though as a proficient guitar player wannabe...
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: exegete77 on February 21, 2013, 02:55:39 PM
I have been playing guitar for 51 years. My starter was a 1934 Montgomery Wards guitar that my father bought when he left home (at age 14); that action was about ˝ inch! Many bloody fingers for that time!! Then for confirmation in 1963 I received a handmade guitar from my parents. Two brothers began making guitars in the early 1960’s. This was the second one that the older brother made, and he only made nine. I gave this to our oldest granddaughter three years ago; it is the only surviving guitar from that line. Those two brothers taught me how to play. They were (and still are in their 80’s) superb guitarists.

In 1964 I paid $400 for a 1956 Gibson, thin body, double cut away with single pickup—bright cherry. One of the smoothest playing guitars ever made. I played that in taverns, dancehalls, etc. beginning in 1967 (yeah they were lax about age then). The brother who made my guitar also played rhythm guitar and would sing, while I played lead on the Gibson; then he would switch to the fiddle and I played his flattop (one made by his younger brother).For my 21st birthday we played at a tavern doing that kind of thing. When we finally left at 5:00 AM, I made $3 and he gained two quarts of dill pickles.  ;D It was the only time I ever made money on playing guitar.

I kept that Gibson until 1992, when I sold it so that I could buy a handmade guitar by the younger brother (he has made about 225, plus about 175 Mandolins). It cost $1300 at the time. Today his guitars sell for $3500, and Mandolins for ~$6500. I have played this in church services, weddings, family gatherings, etc.(no more taverns!). When I do play with others, this guitar stands up well against any Martin or any other top-of-the-line flattop guitar. In the early 1960’s he had made a few classical guitars, and one was played by Segovia who commented that it was one of the best he had ever played.

So, right now I have one guitar. My preferred style of music is bluegrass (flat-picking) and old (pre-1965 mostly) style country music. Over the years, guitar playing has been one place of solace for me, especially in my teen years. But even now I can begin playing to relax.

(Thanks for starting this thread)
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: exegete77 on February 21, 2013, 03:06:31 PM
Here is the link to the younger brother discussing the background of making the guitars and mandolins. I have played many times in that kitchen setting where the interview takes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_EOLuc8u5U
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on February 21, 2013, 03:17:54 PM
I have been playing guitar for 51 years. My starter was a 1934 Montgomery Wards guitar that my father bought when he left home (at age 14); that action was about ˝ inch! Many bloody fingers for that time!! Then for confirmation in 1963 I received a handmade guitar from my parents. Two brothers began making guitars in the early 1960’s. This was the second one that the older brother made, and he only made nine. I gave this to our oldest granddaughter three years ago; it is the only surviving guitar from that line. Those two brothers taught me how to play. They were (and still are in their 80’s) superb guitarists.

In 1964 I paid $400 for a 1956 Gibson, thin body, double cut away with single pickup—bright cherry. One of the smoothest playing guitars ever made. I played that in taverns, dancehalls, etc. beginning in 1967 (yeah they were lax about age then). The brother who made my guitar also played rhythm guitar and would sing, while I played lead on the Gibson; then he would switch to the fiddle and I played his flattop (one made by his younger brother).For my 21st birthday we played at a tavern doing that kind of thing. When we finally left at 5:00 AM, I made $3 and he gained two quarts of dill pickles.  ;D It was the only time I ever made money on playing guitar.

I kept that Gibson until 1992, when I sold it so that I could buy a handmade guitar by the younger brother (he has made about 225, plus about 175 Mandolins). It cost $1300 at the time. Today his guitars sell for $3500, and Mandolins for ~$6500. I have played this in church services, weddings, family gatherings, etc.(no more taverns!). When I do play with others, this guitar stands up well against any Martin or any other top-of-the-line flattop guitar. In the early 1960’s he had made a few classical guitars, and one was played by Segovia who commented that it was one of the best he had ever played.

So, right now I have one guitar. My preferred style of music is bluegrass (flat-picking) and old (pre-1965 mostly) style country music. Over the years, guitar playing has been one place of solace for me, especially in my teen years. But even now I can begin playing to relax.

(Thanks for starting this thread)

Here is the link to the younger brother discussing the background of making the guitars and mandolins. I have played many times in that kitchen setting where the interview takes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_EOLuc8u5U

Wow, that is very cool!  Loved the video -- he sure builds a beauty of a guitar.

I'm about to build another Stratocaster, but I wouldn't know where to start building an acoustic.  That's a rare skill.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: George Erdner on February 21, 2013, 03:28:55 PM
I started in the 60's with a nameless, el cheapo acoustic with terrible action. My first real guitar was a Kapa Continental solid-body six string, which had German-made Hohner humbucker pickups. . I eventually acquired a Harmony H-27 bass (Fender P-bass copy) which also had a Hohner pickup. At the time, I didn't even know that Hohner pickups had a good reputation. I played through a Martin SS-140 AMP (actually a re-labeled RMI) and a Heathkit bass amp I assembled myself. I sold all my gear in the mid-70's, and didn't touch a guitar again until the late 1990's.


I traded a pro-wrestler's jacket I got because he owed me money for a BC Rich Warlock bass, which I then traded for a Squier DG-6 acoustic. I installed an Artec single-coil sound hole pickup and an Artec preamp to electrify the DG-6. Then I got a Photogenic bass on eBay. It's an Ibanez with a brand label usually only sold in Japan. It has the common hybrid P and J pickup setup. Then I got my main, go-to guitar, an Alvarez acoustic-electric 12-string.


I play everything through a Peavey KB-100 keyboard amp. Several people recommended it because it was designed to also serve as a coffee-house rig with a channel for a mic and another for keyboard or guitar, and because it had enough bottom to easily handle a bass guitar. I use a Zoom pedal on the 12 string to remove the "quacky" piezo sound and make it sound more like an acoustic playing louder.


Until around a year ago, I played quite often. Since last December, I hardly ever play at all. I miss playing. I miss it a lot.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: Jeremy Loesch on February 21, 2013, 03:32:04 PM
George, why don't you play anymore?  I remember seeing a youtube video of you playing and singing some hymns.  I thought it was quite nice. 

Jeremy
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: exegete77 on February 21, 2013, 03:36:13 PM
This a photo of it now. When I bought it, the front wood was very very light almost creamy colored. But aging of the wood has darkened it to this beautiful result.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/filosofer777/8495113711/in/photostream
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on February 21, 2013, 03:36:53 PM
I started in the 60's with a nameless, el cheapo acoustic with terrible action. My first real guitar was a Kapa Continental solid-body six string, which had German-made Hohner humbucker pickups. . I eventually acquired a Harmony H-27 bass (Fender P-bass copy) which also had a Hohner pickup. At the time, I didn't even know that Hohner pickups had a good reputation. I played through a Martin SS-140 AMP (actually a re-labeled RMI) and a Heathkit bass amp I assembled myself. I sold all my gear in the mid-70's, and didn't touch a guitar again until the late 1990's.


I traded a pro-wrestler's jacket I got because he owed me money for a BC Rich Warlock bass, which I then traded for a Squier DG-6 acoustic. I installed an Artec single-coil sound hole pickup and an Artec preamp to electrify the DG-6. Then I got a Photogenic bass on eBay. It's an Ibanez with a brand label usually only sold in Japan. It has the common hybrid P and J pickup setup. Then I got my main, go-to guitar, an Alvarez acoustic-electric 12-string.


I play everything through a Peavey KB-100 keyboard amp. Several people recommended it because it was designed to also serve as a coffee-house rig with a channel for a mic and another for keyboard or guitar, and because it had enough bottom to easily handle a bass guitar. I use a Zoom pedal on the 12 string to remove the "quacky" piezo sound and make it sound more like an acoustic playing louder.


Until around a year ago, I played quite often. Since last December, I hardly ever play at all. I miss playing. I miss it a lot.

If you are able, try a K&K Pure Western pickup system on that Alvarez.  A friend of mine has one on his Martin OM, and it is amazing.  Similar to the ES system on Taylor guitars, in that it has mini microphones that are attached to the bottom of the soundboard with adhesive, but unlike the Taylor, it doesn't have a magnetic pickup under the fingerboard.  The K&K has 3, mine has 2.  They are very transparent.  I like the Taylor system because I can turn these on or off as needed (or I can turn one off and leave the other on).  But the K&K setup is very nice.  I highly recommend it.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: George Erdner on February 21, 2013, 03:39:25 PM
George, why don't you play anymore?  I remember seeing a youtube video of you playing and singing some hymns.  I thought it was quite nice. 

Jeremy


Several factors, including age and some personal issues. I'm glad you liked the stuff I put on YouTube. I have the entire set of sheet music for the folk mass "Rejoice" available as a .pdf file. It's been out of print for decades. The guy who wrote it said he doesn't mind me sharing copies.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: George Erdner on February 21, 2013, 03:43:48 PM
If you are able, try a K&K Pure Western pickup system on that Alvarez.  A friend of mine has one on his Martin OM, and it is amazing.  Similar to the ES system on Taylor guitars, in that it has mini microphones that are attached to the bottom of the soundboard with adhesive, but unlike the Taylor, it doesn't have a magnetic pickup under the fingerboard.  The K&K has 3, mine has 2.  They are very transparent.  I like the Taylor system because I can turn these on or off as needed (or I can turn one off and leave the other on).  But the K&K setup is very nice.  I highly recommend it.


I thought about that, but if I'm going to go that route, I think that I'd rather just trade the guitar for a 12 with a Florentine cutaway and an internal mic pickup system. Alvarez and others have guitars like that on the market. I've heard guitars with the internal mics like you describe. I think they sound great. Likewise the ones with contact transducers. My Alvarez is really nice, and I like it a lot. But if I'm going to upgrade, I'd like to not only get better pickups, I's also want an all-around better guitar.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on February 21, 2013, 03:46:07 PM
This a photo of it now. When I bought it, the front wood was very very light almost creamy colored. But aging of the wood has darkened it to this beautiful result.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/filosofer777/8495113711/in/photostream

Beautiful.

Here's my Taylor:

http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff473/DGarner211/Taylorfront2-1_zpsf7ffc433.jpg

And my no. 1:

http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff473/DGarner211/DSCN0823.jpg

Deluxe Reverb clone with my Telecaster and PRS DGT:

http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff473/DGarner211/100_2551-1_zps81203f9b.jpg

And the workhorse, my main gigging amp, a Mesa Boogie Express 5:50:

http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff473/DGarner211/DSCN0825.jpg
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: Brian Stoffregen on February 21, 2013, 03:47:36 PM
I started playing guitar in 1964 with a classical guitar. Bought a Yamaha 12-string in 1968 for use in a Gospel singing group. In 1972-3, while working in a music store at seminary, I bought a Guild D-50. It's an acoustic 6-string guitar with rosewood back and sides. (I believe that Guild has changed owners since then.) Of all the guitars in the store it was the best sounding one and somewhat less costly than a Martin. I was into the folk scene. (New models run from $3300-3600.) I'm still using it.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on February 21, 2013, 04:04:29 PM
I started playing guitar in 1964 with a classical guitar. Bought a Yamaha 12-string in 1968 for use in a Gospel singing group. In 1972-3, while working in a music store at seminary, I bought a Guild D-50. It's an acoustic 6-string guitar with rosewood back and sides. (I believe that Guild has changed owners since then.) Of all the guitars in the store it was the best sounding one and somewhat less costly than a Martin. I was into the folk scene. (New models run from $3300-3600.) I'm still using it.

I love Guild guitars.  Fender owns them now.  Not sure if that's a good or a bad thing.  I'm a huge fan of Fender electrics.  Not so much their acoustics.  But I assume they use the old Guild designs.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: exegete77 on February 21, 2013, 04:06:28 PM

Here's my Taylor:

And my no. 1:

Deluxe Reverb clone with my Telecaster and PRS DGT:

And the workhorse, my main gigging amp, a Mesa Boogie Express 5:50:


Nice guitars! I still miss having the Gibson, but don’t play enough to justify buying a new one.

I had a pickup unit (but no controls) put into this flattop so I can play with whatever amp is available, and even works plugging directly into sound systems.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: Steverem on February 21, 2013, 04:41:18 PM
I admit to being a bit of an odd bird: I'm not a guitar player myself (I do own an old Alverez, and occasionally pull it out just to play the 10-12 chords I know), but I have a number of friends who are musicians by trade, and I have developed an appreciation for all things guitar.  Some beautiful instruments being mentioned here!
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: George Erdner on February 21, 2013, 05:16:21 PM
I had a pickup unit (but no controls) put into this flattop so I can play with whatever amp is available, and even works plugging directly into sound systems.


The one time I played at an open mic, I went direct through the PA. And, when we did the outdoor blessing of the animals at my church back in 2011, I also went through the portable PA. That works pretty well.


What kind of pickup did you have installed? Under saddle piezo, sound hole magnetic, internal transducers, or something else? From what I've heard from people who use all those kinds, they're all pretty good. I did get some good advice from a guy at the local Music Center store. I had been using phospher-bronze 80-20 strings with my magnetic sound-hole pickup, and had fair results. On his recommendation I switched to light gauge electric guitar strings. The improved magnetic properties of the strings made a major improvement.



Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: Steverem on February 21, 2013, 05:25:56 PM
Just because some here will appreciate it:  http://www.guitargeek.com/
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: exegete77 on February 21, 2013, 05:46:09 PM
I had a pickup unit (but no controls) put into this flattop so I can play with whatever amp is available, and even works plugging directly into sound systems.


The one time I played at an open mic, I went direct through the PA. And, when we did the outdoor blessing of the animals at my church back in 2011, I also went through the portable PA. That works pretty well.


What kind of pickup did you have installed? Under saddle piezo, sound hole magnetic, internal transducers, or something else? From what I've heard from people who use all those kinds, they're all pretty good. I did get some good advice from a guy at the local Music Center store. I had been using phospher-bronze 80-20 strings with my magnetic sound-hole pickup, and had fair results. On his recommendation I switched to light gauge electric guitar strings. The improved magnetic properties of the strings made a major improvement.
Don’t remember the unit that was put in (about 16 years ago). It was put in internally, so nothing shows, except the plug-in hole. The unit is mounted at the base of the neck, and to the top of the front. Actually I have not used it that way since 1998. It worked really well in the church I was serving at the time.

I alternate between light and medium gauge strings; there are a couple brands that are specifically designed for bluegrass style picking.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on February 21, 2013, 06:15:04 PM
Just because some here will appreciate it:  http://www.guitargeek.com/

Oh, wow -- you have no idea how many hours of my life you just wasted.

I may not see y'all again for months.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: Brian Stoffregen on February 21, 2013, 06:55:14 PM
I started playing guitar in 1964 with a classical guitar. Bought a Yamaha 12-string in 1968 for use in a Gospel singing group. In 1972-3, while working in a music store at seminary, I bought a Guild D-50. It's an acoustic 6-string guitar with rosewood back and sides. (I believe that Guild has changed owners since then.) Of all the guitars in the store it was the best sounding one and somewhat less costly than a Martin. I was into the folk scene. (New models run from $3300-3600.) I'm still using it.

I love Guild guitars.  Fender owns them now.  Not sure if that's a good or a bad thing.  I'm a huge fan of Fender electrics.  Not so much their acoustics.  But I assume they use the old Guild designs.


When I working in the music store, the Fender acoustics were not so good. The "hot" new item at that time was the Ovation guitars. Popular for touring groups because it was hard to damage the plastic bodies and you could buy an acoustic with electronic pickups inside. (They weren't all that good.) But on tours, bands are more concerned about volume rather than quality. Many musicians use their high quality instruments for recording in the studio and the durable ones for life on the road.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: George Erdner on February 21, 2013, 07:42:07 PM
I had a pickup unit (but no controls) put into this flattop so I can play with whatever amp is available, and even works plugging directly into sound systems.


The one time I played at an open mic, I went direct through the PA. And, when we did the outdoor blessing of the animals at my church back in 2011, I also went through the portable PA. That works pretty well.


What kind of pickup did you have installed? Under saddle piezo, sound hole magnetic, internal transducers, or something else? From what I've heard from people who use all those kinds, they're all pretty good. I did get some good advice from a guy at the local Music Center store. I had been using phospher-bronze 80-20 strings with my magnetic sound-hole pickup, and had fair results. On his recommendation I switched to light gauge electric guitar strings. The improved magnetic properties of the strings made a major improvement.
Don’t remember the unit that was put in (about 16 years ago). It was put in internally, so nothing shows, except the plug-in hole. The unit is mounted at the base of the neck, and to the top of the front. Actually I have not used it that way since 1998. It worked really well in the church I was serving at the time.

I alternate between light and medium gauge strings; there are a couple brands that are specifically designed for bluegrass style picking.


What you describe sounds like the pick-up from a Gibson or Epiphone EJ-160E (http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/EEEJVCCH/). That's similar to how my 6-string guitar now works.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: exegete77 on February 21, 2013, 09:26:11 PM
When I was learning to play, we would meet at the home of one of the two brothers, usually Friday or Saturday evening. Sometimes others would join in and play. Also, their houses became a stop over spot for traveling musicians. Sometimes I could make it, sometimes school activities prevented that. One weekend the Stoneman Family (not the whole family of 22!) stopped to play. I missed that one.

Another time, I had a school function and they told me about their weekend visitor. The guy was a tremendous singer, but couldn’t play guitar worth a lick. His name? Charlie Pride; yep, before he made it big. He was just making his way to Nashville to try to make it in the big city.

So many good memories of playing guitar, learning, and listening to stories. They learned from my step-grandfather. He was born in 1872 and learned classical violin, and then when he was 18 (1890) he began working on the original railroads in Iowa. He learned many old timey songs and many Civil War songs. He and my grandmother and my father (11) moved to northern Minnesota in 1931. In the late 1940’s he began teaching these two brothers, especially the old timey music. I knew him only briefly, he died when I was 4. But I remember him playing fiddle. And they passed many of those songs on to me.

Here is a photo from the 1940’s and my comments. Bluegrass 1940’s style (http://exegete77.wordpress.com/2011/06/14/bluegrass-%E2%80%94-my-heritage/). The banjo player is the one who made my guitar, and is featured in the YouTube video up thread. The man on the right is the older brother, who made my first guitar. That is my grandfather in the center with the fiddle.

When we got together, we all played guitar, and sat in a “circle” alternating playing lead and the others played rhythm and back fill harmony. We would play the same song through three times so that we each played lead on the song. What a great experience. In addition, the older brother would play fiddle, and the younger one (in the video) played mandolin. What a great way to learn the songs and play interchangably. That served me well over the past 50 years.

Wow, many memories coming back to me.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: Charles_Austin on February 21, 2013, 10:15:57 PM
Sounds like a guitar version of:

"Daddy sang bass, Momma sang tenor;
Me 'n little brother would join right in there
Singin' seems to help a troubled soul...."
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: Jay Michael on February 21, 2013, 11:01:57 PM
Sad... but true story

My brother was given a guitar by our great uncle ... a prized possession probably more for sentimental reasons than for its value.  One day bringing it back to the car he was distracted ... failed to get it in the car and backed over it.  The thought of loosing the guitar still hurts to this day.

Please care for your instruments so you do not repeat his experience.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: Evangel on February 22, 2013, 08:53:49 AM
Started with taking lessons in the mid-70's when I was still in elementary school and continued through the middle of my high school years.  My teacher put me in a Gretsch classical guitar that I never thought very highly of as a kid ... I still have it today though, and enjoy playing it from time to time.  My middle daughter started taking lessons a couple of years ago and used it as well.

I never got very good but could play all the non-bar chords on the classical - so I was recruited to play for church doing things like silent night and accompanying the Sunday School opening.

Later I got a Japanese Stratocaster copy (Hondo) and all of a sudden I could play bar chords!  I wish I had the opportunity to play a guitar with a faster neck when I was taking lessons - that probably would have made a big difference in how much I learned.

We started a Saturday evening "contemporary" worship service in 1992 (actually it was what would later be called "Blended worship" by Robert Webber) using a really neat liturgy that Augsburg-Fortress published as a stand-alone resource written and composed by Marshall Bowen. 

At that time I put away my guitars and got a bass.  My first one was a 1990 USA made Hamer Chaparral 4-string with a set-in neck.  I played that through a direct box into the decent PA system we had in the church. 

Our worship band got some degree of notoriety in the ELCA New England synod for our creativity in playing both Bowen's liturgy and the setting 5 out of WOV with a 5-piece band (2 guitars, bass, keyboard, drums) and we were invited to play at a synod event on renewing worship.  If I remember correctly, it was for that event that I picked up an SWR Workingman's 15 bass amp.

Some time after that I had the opportunity to play someones 5 string bass and fell in love with the wider fret board and string spacing - so I bought a USA made Peavy Cirrus 5 with neck-through construction.  That is the bass and amplifier I play to this day.

Somewhere along the line a friend gave me a cheap Japanese Telecaster copy that had all kinds of electrical and intonation problems but a decent body and straight neck.  I rebuilt that guitar from the ground up with parts from Stewart-Macdonald ... I think it plays and sounds pretty good now.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: Dadoo on February 22, 2013, 09:54:33 AM
I got fascinated with guitars at about age 15 and took lessons for a while and then struck out on my own. It still own the K. Suzuki 12 string that was my 2nd guitar - I no longer have the Hoefner classical that I learned on. I gave it away. Guitar must travel.
I ended up playing the bar circuit all through college and my 20s. When I headed for seminary I unloaded most of my instruments - most of them electrics.  I still have my '72 Les Paul Deluxe (cherry sunburst) and my Daion bass. Both are tragically neglected. I just have no place or reason to play them.
Since then I have acquired a Guild "J" body 6 string. I played it in church for 20 years plus. It once even got stolen out of the office. THe local police chief made a mayor case out of that and it came back by Monday afternoon. Recently I felt that it was getting much too beaten up being played now every week. I found, with the help of my favorite enabler - the Lutheran proprietor of Guitar Attention Center, Springfield OH, a Washburn Dreadnought. It had hung in his shop for a while because it had been outfitted oddly: Black tuners; binding and pickguard are in a bright tortoise shell and the guitar is maple body and spruce top. It sounds awesome though and the neck and fingerboard feel almost exactly like my Guild. I used to use a Duncan Woody to run them into sound but shifted to a Fishman rare earth blend pickup. Pickup and mic combo - it is a great idea, sound wise.
The only amp I still have is a 70's Fender Champ. Yes, it is all of a blazing 10 amps - but it sounds good. For a while I used it on stage and mic'd it. I moved on to a Yamaha solid state amp at some point. It left. The Champ stayed
SOmewhere I picked up playing Dobro as well. I keep one around and play it sparingly but really enjoy the sound and feel of the instrument.
Now and again I pick up sad and abused  guitar children at yard sales and give them a new life and home. AN old Mosrite Tele awaits some loving care and re fretting in my workshop as we speak.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on February 22, 2013, 10:22:12 AM
I just ordered a parchment pickguard for my Strat.  I like the black one, but I'm getting a bit tired of it, so I want to return it back to stock, and unfortunately, the stock guard broke.  It will go from this:

http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff473/DGarner211/DSCN0823.jpg

To something more like this:

http://www.stratoblogster.com/2009/03/eric-johnson-maple-fretboard-strat.html
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: George Erdner on February 22, 2013, 12:40:36 PM
Our worship band got some degree of notoriety in the ELCA New England synod for our creativity in playing both Bowen's liturgy and the setting 5 out of WOV with a 5-piece band (2 guitars, bass, keyboard, drums) and we were invited to play at a synod event on renewing worship.



WOV 5 is an excellent service to accompany with a band. It's one of my favorites.


I used to use a Duncan Woody to run them into sound but shifted to a Fishman rare earth blend pickup. Pickup and mic combo - it is a great idea, sound wise.



I have heard nothing but good things about both the Woody and the Fishman. The pickup and mic combo usually sounds great every time I've heard a guitar with that kind of a rig.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: exegete77 on February 23, 2013, 10:56:14 PM
Clarence White (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CMQuuZNvwLU&list=PL1EEBE2D6B187FE8E&index=16)-- one of my favorite flat picking songs/videos.

Here is the the best flat picker of all time, Doc Watson, Black Mountain Rag (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XdUrg2Cqxdw&list=PLEACD49C9600342CF). He became blind as a very young child. That never became a barrier for him.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on February 25, 2013, 09:54:42 AM
Clarence White (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CMQuuZNvwLU&list=PL1EEBE2D6B187FE8E&index=16)-- one of my favorite flat picking songs/videos.

Here is the the best flat picker of all time, Doc Watson, Black Mountain Rag (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XdUrg2Cqxdw&list=PLEACD49C9600342CF). He became blind as a very young child. That never became a barrier for him.

I've always been partial to Norman Blake:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UEkVkJax2Co
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: racin_jason on February 25, 2013, 03:25:15 PM
Are there any pastors here who didn't start playing guitar until their '40's and can now lead their congregation in song? I'm looking for a role model/inspiration. 

I play a little but want to learn more. This came about because my son is taking lessons and it's something we can do together. So I got a new guitar in December, an Ovation CC48.  My goal for Lent is to lead the table prayer with the congregation before midweek soup suppers, sung to  the tune of Edelweiss, consisting of 5 chords, 3 of which are basic. I barely play it adequately.

Instead of attending seminars that are so often exercises in abstract thinking with little applicabilty the the parish setting, perhaps congregations would get a bigger bang for their buck if they just paid for guitar lessons for those pastors with more than modicum of musical instincts. 
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: Johan Bergfest on February 25, 2013, 05:09:57 PM
Are there any pastors here who didn't start playing guitar until their '40's and can now lead their congregation in song? I'm looking for a role model/inspiration. 

Here is one suggestion, a very helpful introduction/self-study manual for folk style guitar playing.  It's out of print, so buy one of the used copies:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Folksingers-Guitar-Guide-Instruction/dp/0825600138



Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: George Erdner on February 25, 2013, 05:24:23 PM
Are there any pastors here who didn't start playing guitar until their '40's and can now lead their congregation in song? I'm looking for a role model/inspiration. 

I play a little but want to learn more. This came about because my son is taking lessons and it's something we can do together. So I got a new guitar in December, an Ovation CC48.  My goal for Lent is to lead the table prayer with the congregation before midweek soup suppers, sung to  the tune of Edelweiss, consisting of 5 chords, 3 of which are basic. I barely play it adequately.

Instead of attending seminars that are so often exercises in abstract thinking with little applicabilty the the parish setting, perhaps congregations would get a bigger bang for their buck if they just paid for guitar lessons for those pastors with more than modicum of musical instincts.


More than a few of us who play guitar and sing have some degree of "BB King Disease". BBK is an incredible guitarist, and an outstanding blues singer. However, he cannot to both at the same time. I can only manage to strum chords when I'm also singing, but if I don't have to also sing, then I can get a little fancier on the guitar.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: racin_jason on February 27, 2013, 03:02:17 PM
Are there any pastors here who didn't start playing guitar until their '40's and can now lead their congregation in song? I'm looking for a role model/inspiration. 

Here is one suggestion, a very helpful introduction/self-study manual for folk style guitar playing.  It's out of print, so buy one of the used copies:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Folksingers-Guitar-Guide-Instruction/dp/0825600138

I will do so. I appreciate the lead. Thanks.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: Mark Joel on February 27, 2013, 03:23:28 PM
 :) Then, for beginning guitar player and back-pew baritone, go here:

https://ebookstore.sony.com/ebook/mark-j-anderson/christmas-songs-for-the-amateur-guitarist-and-low-voices/_/R-400000000000000872522

 ;D
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: Johan Bergfest on February 27, 2013, 05:17:45 PM
It is a bit more advanced, but approachable if you can read tablature and do some basic finger picking, but  John Michael Talbot's song book (http://www.amazon.com/MICHAEL-TALBOT-Special-Guitar-Tablature/dp/B000CD3LOM (http://www.amazon.com/MICHAEL-TALBOT-Special-Guitar-Tablature/dp/B000CD3LOM)) would be a nice addition - if you can find a copy.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on March 01, 2013, 07:52:39 AM
I'm having a ridiculous case of GAS (hopefully everyone in this thread knows what that means) since Charvel announced they would be building their So Cal Pro Mod series in Ensenada, Mexico.  I want the red one:

http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff473/DGarner211/Charvel_zps1bba3e9a.jpg

But then I saw this and said "hey, I can build that....":

http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff473/DGarner211/Strat-Floyd_zps2e47d66c.jpg

As a child of the 1980s, I've always wanted a guitar with a Floyd on it.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: Evangel on March 01, 2013, 08:33:58 AM
Stewmac.com is your friend ...  http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Bridges,_tailpieces/Electric_guitar_tremolos/Floyd_Rose_tremolos_and_parts.html
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: TravisW on March 02, 2013, 12:44:11 AM
I started in 1989 with a Conn classical that's about the same vintage as me (mid-70s). My first electric was a Lotus strat copy. Since then, I've owned...well, quite a few guitars. My current prides and joys are the aforementioned Conn, a 1979 Les Paul, my Jackson RR5, and the "Green Manalishi", the building of which mysteriously corresponds with my inactivity on ALPB. I'm planning a couple of Flying V builds this summer.

Here's me acting like an idiot demonstrating the green guitar: http://youtu.be/O5jzfceNgl8

Here's the build thread for those interested: http://www.mylespaul.com/forums/luthiers-corner/177708-longest-build-thread-ever-probably.html
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: TravisW on March 02, 2013, 09:45:33 AM
David - I've heard a lot of good things about what Fender is doing in their Mexican production facilities (Charvel, Jacksons, and EVH have guitars made there too).
If you decide to go the Floyd route, be sure to read up on some setup scenarios, or the Floyd can quickly become a hated enemy. Once you're used to the string changes, leveling the bridge (or blocking it of you don't want it to float), etc...they're great.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: pr dtp on March 03, 2013, 12:47:45 AM
Started playing as a kid - on a hand me down guitar my step-brother smashed in a rage.

In college I bought a real guitar, not a hand-me down - a Takamine hand made model - use a sound hole mic in it.  Eventually picked up a Jazz Chorus which I love but the weight of the thing is prohibitive.

When I was leading worship and later at my first church (non-denom) my wife let me get a special edition 12 string Ovation Balladeer- which until recently was my primary guitar.  My worship minister is a very accomplished classical and jazz guitarists, acutally is a professor of music and worship - so I just play rhythm guitar for our mid-week service.  (He worked with Robert Webber - and has a goal of 5 settings of the liturgy - each translated into 5 languages by 2016  - he is in the studio now with the 2nd setting.  Awesome stuff)

Until my birthday this year, when my wife got me this:

http://www.samash.com/p/Ibanez_AM73%20Hollow%20Body%20Electric%20Guitar_184235 

For a low end guitar - it plays phenomenal well - especially though the old Jazz Chorus...
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: George Erdner on March 03, 2013, 10:04:36 AM
Started playing as a kid - on a hand me down guitar my step-brother smashed in a rage.

In college I bought a real guitar, not a hand-me down - a Takamine hand made model - use a sound hole mic in it.  Eventually picked up a Jazz Chorus which I love but the weight of the thing is prohibitive.

When I was leading worship and later at my first church (non-denom) my wife let me get a special edition 12 string Ovation Balladeer- which until recently was my primary guitar.  My worship minister is a very accomplished classical and jazz guitarists, acutally is a professor of music and worship - so I just play rhythm guitar for our mid-week service.  (He worked with Robert Webber - and has a goal of 5 settings of the liturgy - each translated into 5 languages by 2016  - he is in the studio now with the 2nd setting.  Awesome stuff)

Until my birthday this year, when my wife got me this:

http://www.samash.com/p/Ibanez_AM73%20Hollow%20Body%20Electric%20Guitar_184235 (http://www.samash.com/p/Ibanez_AM73%20Hollow%20Body%20Electric%20Guitar_184235) 

For a low end guitar - it plays phenomenal well - especially though the old Jazz Chorus...


Ibanez is a guitar maker that doesn't get the respect it deserves. They generally produce very good instruments at a very reasonable price. I played an AM73 at a guitar store once. It's very reminiscent of a Gibson ES-335, which is one of the guitars that has been on my wish list for decades. I think a semi-hollow with humbuckers is one of the more versatile formats out there.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: Evangel on March 03, 2013, 05:46:13 PM
... My worship minister is a very accomplished classical and jazz guitarists, acutally is a professor of music and worship - so I just play rhythm guitar for our mid-week service.  (He worked with Robert Webber - and has a goal of 5 settings of the liturgy - each translated into 5 languages by 2016  - he is in the studio now with the 2nd setting.  Awesome stuff) ...

Are these available anywhere yet?
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: pr dtp on March 03, 2013, 08:08:41 PM
... My worship minister is a very accomplished classical and jazz guitarists, acutally is a professor of music and worship - so I just play rhythm guitar for our mid-week service.  (He worked with Robert Webber - and has a goal of 5 settings of the liturgy - each translated into 5 languages by 2016  - he is in the studio now with the 2nd setting.  Awesome stuff) ...

Are these available anywhere yet?

Yes - will send you links through private message:
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on March 05, 2013, 04:02:18 PM
Started playing as a kid - on a hand me down guitar my step-brother smashed in a rage.

In college I bought a real guitar, not a hand-me down - a Takamine hand made model - use a sound hole mic in it.  Eventually picked up a Jazz Chorus which I love but the weight of the thing is prohibitive.

When I was leading worship and later at my first church (non-denom) my wife let me get a special edition 12 string Ovation Balladeer- which until recently was my primary guitar.  My worship minister is a very accomplished classical and jazz guitarists, acutally is a professor of music and worship - so I just play rhythm guitar for our mid-week service.  (He worked with Robert Webber - and has a goal of 5 settings of the liturgy - each translated into 5 languages by 2016  - he is in the studio now with the 2nd setting.  Awesome stuff)

Until my birthday this year, when my wife got me this:

http://www.samash.com/p/Ibanez_AM73%20Hollow%20Body%20Electric%20Guitar_184235 (http://www.samash.com/p/Ibanez_AM73%20Hollow%20Body%20Electric%20Guitar_184235) 

For a low end guitar - it plays phenomenal well - especially though the old Jazz Chorus...


Ibanez is a guitar maker that doesn't get the respect it deserves. They generally produce very good instruments at a very reasonable price. I played an AM73 at a guitar store once. It's very reminiscent of a Gibson ES-335, which is one of the guitars that has been on my wish list for decades. I think a semi-hollow with humbuckers is one of the more versatile formats out there.

The late 1970s AS series Ibanez are sought after by Jazz players.  Some of the best guitars ever made.

Another well kept secret is Japanese Fenders, especially Strats.  And Les Paul copies by Tokai and Burny.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on May 04, 2013, 03:23:44 PM
I had some DiMarzio Area noiseless pickups in my Strat, and I decided to put some in the Telecaster as well.  I got the Area T 615 bridge ("615" is the area code for Nashville, Tennessee) and the Area T neck, to replace the DiMarzio Twang Kings that were in there before.  In conjunction with installing the new pickups, I also shielded the Telecaster with conductive adhesive backed copper tape (which then emboldened me to shield the Strat as well).  Basically, you create a Faraday cage ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday_cage (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday_cage) ) around the pickups by shielding the control cavity, pickup cavities and pickguard with some conductive material like the copper tape (some actually just use aluminum foil), and then wiring a ground wire to connect all the shielding together.  You then star ground everything to a common ground (rather than having all the grounds on the backs of the potentiometers).  It is now dead quiet whether you are touching the strings or not, with all but the most obscene levels of gain.  The shielding eliminates radiofrequency interference (such as from flourescent lighting or televisions, computers, etc.) and grounding issues, and the pickups eliminate 60 cycle hum that you get from single coils.  That would be "nice, but...." if the pickups didn't sound great, but they seriously sound just like single coil pickups.  You have to set them properly -- lower is better -- but the Telecaster sounds like a Telecaster and the Strat sounds like a Strat.

Since we gig a fair amount, I was tired of having bad lighting and wiring create ridiculous levels of hum in my rig.  I'm pretty pleased with the Areas and the shielding.  I'd recommend both to anyone interested.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: cnehring on May 05, 2013, 08:23:51 AM
Alright: my first guitar was an Yahama classical got for Christmas one year. Learned to play on that at college while sitting on the deck of the dorm room.

Due to a complete act of whim (b/c of a girl), I went out and bought an used Epiphone. I converted it to left-handed, as that is what I play. Had that for years and it is still a nice sounding guitar.

Recently bought an Ibanez left handed with the internal Fishman pickups. Like it.

I play a bit in church. However, I started a couple of years ago using the guitar to teach the kids the liturgy and hymns of the church. Started out with the Doxology-a year before I re-introduced it in the Divine Service. This year, we worked on the Agnus Dei and now we are learning the hymn, "Beautiful Savior." Kids love it b/c of the guitar-yet they are also learning the music of the Church.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on June 10, 2013, 09:24:46 PM
My band was fortunate to play a benefit concert called "LawJam 2013" at Variety Playhouse for the 2nd time this past weekend.  It was a battle of the Atlanta lawyer bands hosted by the Atlanta Bar Foundation, and was set up as a competition between 7 bands.  All proceeds went to provide legal services for the poor.  Photos of the event are here:

http://multimedia.dailyreportonline.com/2013/06/after-hours-lawjam-2013/

Photos of my band are 18-26.  We were even more fortunate, given the 6 other talented bands playing, to have won the competition for both best overall band and best original song (for "Ten" off our debut album, which you can listen to here, along with "We'll Never Be As Young As We Are Tonight" and "First Georgia Regret," which we also played -- http://bellwetherstation.bandcamp.com/ -- the header photo on that page is from the first time we played the event).

We closed the set with Baba O'Riley by The Who.  Fun night.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on September 11, 2014, 09:04:24 PM
New rig. Sold some stuff to fund the Les Paul/Marshall setup I've always wanted.

http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff473/DGarner211/Guitar/image_zpsa7248891.jpeg
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: exegete77 on September 13, 2014, 04:33:14 PM
Very nice, David. I'm not really jealous, really I'm not. Lord, forgive my jealousy!  ;D
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on September 17, 2014, 10:29:08 PM
Very nice, David. I'm not really jealous, really I'm not. Lord, forgive my jealousy!  ;D

Thanks, but you might not be if you saw it in person.  It's a 1993 model I bought used, and it's pretty beat up.

But it sounds wonderful, and it plays like a dream.  I prefer it to my prettier guitars.  Here's a shot of me at our last gig playing it, before I trimmed my beard and cut my hair  ;D

http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff473/DGarner211/BWAV_zps6a9dba5b.png
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on September 27, 2014, 04:16:06 PM
I had the pleasure of playing the Les Paul/Marshall combo at a benefit gig this past Thursday.  I told the sound man that our stage volume was pretty loud and we might want to side-fill my amp.  He didn't think it would be a problem, but then in soundcheck he said "give me a couple of chords."  When I started playing he immediately waved me off and said "are you going to be that loud all night?"

We still didn't have to side fill, but I bet my guitar was imperceptible in the monitor mix   :D

http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff473/DGarner211/Justice%20Jam%202014/1502724_10103667010518370_3619339874524492102_o_zps2b90fd63.jpg
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on April 12, 2015, 08:21:31 PM
I've managed to get on a gear trading kick, and I've fallen in love with some "cheap" gear.  Stuff that might make a lot of folks might turn their nose up.

First, I traded a Mesa Express amplifier for this Vox AC30cc2, plus some cash on his end.  I probably have about $450 in the amp taking into account trade value versus what I'd have taken for the Mesa in cash, and it's made in China versus the "handmade in Petaluma, California" Mesa.  But it sounds so fantastic.  I mean incredibly good.  I haven't been this happy with a gear acquisition in quite some time.

http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff473/DGarner211/Guitar/IMG_2805_zpsvbifjpni.jpg

Second, and this is my favorite trade by far, I had my Taylor up for sale.  I never play it, and I've always wanted a Gibson J-45, so I'll be getting one of those soon.  In the meantime, the guy who wanted it didn't have enough cash, so he offered to throw in some gear.  One piece is somewhat "valuable" given its condition -- a 1978-1981 era MXR Distortion + pedal.  It's a little scratchy in the pots, and it looks like it's been dragged behind a truck, but it sounds really nice.  However, the guitars were the main event, and I have to say, I haven't been this excited about a guitar acquisition in as long as I can remember.

What he offered was a Made in Mexico Stratocaster and a Danelectro U2 reissue.  The Danelectro is kind of ugly (it's salmon pink), but it has a really cool old timey sound, so I set it up for slide in open G and it's fun to play around with.  But the Strat.  Man, oh, man.  It's their absolute bottom of the line MIM, called the "Traditional Series," and manufactured between 1996 and 1997.  Before that it was called the "Squier Series," which is a little misleading, since it's a Fender and not a Squier, and it's made in Mexico and not Korea or China.  In either event, I wasn't expecting much, but apparently the body and neck are American surplus that were finished in Mexico.  The pickups are standard Mexican ceramics.  The tuners and bridge are pretty much garbage, as are the electronics.  So I decked the trem (to take the bridge out of the equation in terms of tuning stability) and changed the pots and cap to CTS pots and a good 0.022 mF cap, and I also changed the jack to a Switchcraft.  After those mods, this guitar is simply fantastic.  It can absolutely hold its own against my much more expensive Eric Johnson Strat (pictured above with the Vox and the Les Paul).  I'm really pleased with this guitar, and it will be accompanying me to gigs regularly.  "Cheap" or not, this is one of my favorite guitars now.  And it cost me a grand total of about $200 in trade value.  If any of you need a good starter guitar for a kid/grandkid, try to scout one of these out.  You can get them between $200 and $300 depending on condition, and with a little bit of TLC, they are great "players" guitars.  Here it is with the Danelectro.

http://i1237.photobucket.com/albums/ff473/DGarner211/Guitar/A4A2AFEB-CEC3-4424-95C8-67D610A8A776_zpspbuallc1.jpg
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on December 01, 2015, 09:33:37 PM
I just sold off a bunch of pedals to finance a set of Celestion Alnico Blues for the AC30.

I now have more money tied up in the speakers than I do the amp.  But I hear they will transform it, so we will see if it's worth it.  Now I have a bunch of speakers I need to sell (2 Wharfedales, 2 Splawn Small Blocks, and I'd sell the Fender Special Design speaker that came in the 1985 Concert I sold ages ago, but I think I'd actually have to pay somebody to take it -- it sounds terrible).
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: George Erdner on December 01, 2015, 10:03:05 PM
I just got my Christmas present from my wife a month early. I found a beautiful Epiphone Dot Studio at Music-go-Round (a used instrument store). By trading in the bass that I never, ever play any more and its case, the Dot was incredibly affordable. But inexpensive though it might be, it sounds almost as good as the Gibson ES-335 it is an unabashed copy of. Now, I just need to find opportunities to play it for more than just my own amusement.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on December 01, 2015, 10:12:40 PM
I just got my Christmas present from my wife a month early. I found a beautiful Epiphone Dot Studio at Music-go-Round (a used instrument store). By trading in the bass that I never, ever play any more and its case, the Dot was incredibly affordable. But inexpensive though it might be, it sounds almost as good as the Gibson ES-335 it is an unabashed copy of. Now, I just need to find opportunities to play it for more than just my own amusement.

Nice!  I want to get a semi-hollowbody one day, but I already have way too many guitars due to the aforementioned trades.  What I'd like to do one day is sell my PRS that I never play, plus the red Strat and the Danelectro to fund a 335. 

Maybe one day.

Congratulations -- what a fantastic gift!
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: exegete77 on December 05, 2015, 12:29:31 PM
I was saddend to learn that one of the two men who taught me to play guitar died recently. He was 89 years old. Lifelong friend and a great encouragement for me from 1962-1971 (when I graduated from college). He was a Christian friend as well. He is the man on the right side of this photo taken in 1946.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on December 05, 2015, 01:02:53 PM
I was sandende to learn that one of the two men who taught me to play guitar died recently. He was 89 years old. Lifelong friend and a great encouragement for me from 1962-1971 (when I graduated from college). He was a Christian friend as well. He is the man on the right side of this photo taken in 1946.

Memory eternal.  I lost my uncle, who taught me to play, many years ago.  I still think of him often when I play.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: Donald_Kirchner on April 25, 2016, 12:49:59 PM
As a true Minnesotan, had to watch "Purple Rain" Sat night.

The guy was a showman! Watch it to the end.

https://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=6SFNW5F8K9Y

A shortened clip with just Prince's solo:

https://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=7INsVaR-S-w

Something I read about his solo from another site:

"The best part of this guitar solo is the back story. A few weeks before, Rolling Stone released their list of top 100 guitarists of all time. Prince didn't even rank.

...'Is there any proof that Prince's molten-hot solo on that hall of fame induction night's all-star jam performance of "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" had anything to do with him being snubbed from that list? No. But come on now, this is Prince. He doesn't just show up for no reason. Until it came time to destroy the stage with that solo, most people didn't even know Prince was onstage at all. On this night, Prince was on a mission.'

Which makes it all the more epic at the end when he threw his guitar into the crowd and just walked off."

More like strutted off!  ;) The guy was amazing.

Back in the early 90s, my wife and I were down in Mpls and hung out at 1st Avenue late into the night because some guys were messing around with equipment and instruments on the stage. Prince was known to sometimes try out material there, and we thought that might be what they were going to do. But, alas, not that night.  :( Had to wait for the 2007 Super Bowl Half-time show.  ;)
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on April 25, 2016, 04:00:08 PM
As a true Minnesotan, had to watch "Purple Rain" Sat night.

The guy was a showman! Watch it to the end.

https://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=6SFNW5F8K9Y

A shortened clip with just Prince's solo:

https://m.youtube.com/#/watch?v=7INsVaR-S-w

Something I read about his solo from another site:

"The best part of this guitar solo is the back story. A few weeks before, Rolling Stone released their list of top 100 guitarists of all time. Prince didn't even rank.

...'Is there any proof that Prince's molten-hot solo on that hall of fame induction night's all-star jam performance of "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" had anything to do with him being snubbed from that list? No. But come on now, this is Prince. He doesn't just show up for no reason. Until it came time to destroy the stage with that solo, most people didn't even know Prince was onstage at all. On this night, Prince was on a mission.'

Which makes it all the more epic at the end when he threw his guitar into the crowd and just walked off."

More like strutted off!  ;) The guy was amazing.

Back in the early 90s, my wife and I were down in Mpls and hung out at 1st Avenue late into the night because some guys were messing around with equipment and instruments on the stage. Prince was known to sometimes try out material there, and we thought that might be what they were going to do. But, alas, not that night.  :( Had to wait for the 2007 Super Bowl Half-time show.  ;)

He's one of my all time favorites, not only as a guitar player, but as a musician and performer.  My band is playing the Hard Rock Cafe in Atlanta soon, and we're going to close with Purple Rain in his honor.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on July 07, 2016, 09:28:44 PM
If any of you use guitars with humbuckers, and the humbuckers are wax potted, and you love vintage tones, try a set of unpotted pickups.  I sold a set of Fralin pickups I had in one of my Strats and used the funds from the sale to upgrade my Les Paul.  I initially was going to get a new set of Seymour Duncan Seth Lovers, but I found a guy selling a set of used Wolfetone Dr. Vintage pickups for less than the cost of the new Seths so I went with those.  Wolfe has a fantastic reputation, and his pickups lived up to it.

The difference isn't huge, but it is significant.  They still sound like vintage pickups.  I had 57 Classics in there before, and the tone of the Dr. Vs is close to that.  But there is a slight microphonic chirp to the notes and a sweet bloom that just sings when you hold a note.  I use them primarily through one of two amplifiers, a Ceriatone Marshall 18 Watt clone and a Deluxe Reverb.  Through the Deluxe, they are sweet when clean and they get a perfect blues overdrive when you push it a little.  The 18 Watt sounds like 70s rock.  They nail Dickey Betts' Goldie tone through it, and they clean up nicely if you just twist the volume knob back a few notches.  With the 18 Watt, they do controlled feedback better than anything I've used.

These are not for 80s or 90s metal/rock/grunge.  They'll do that if you stack enough pedals or have enough amp, but they aren't suited for it.  They don't squeal at all at 70s rock levels -- up to AC/DC or even harder 80s rock like Guns n Roses.  But they would be unusable with a true high gain amp, I think.  What they are perfect for is rock and blues, especially 60s and 70s rock and blues.  ZZ Top, Black Crowes, AC/DC, Clapton's Beano tone, Allman Brothers, Mike Bloomfield -- it's all there.  I highly recommend trying a set.
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: SomeoneWrites on July 08, 2016, 09:18:24 AM
If any of you use guitars with humbuckers, and the humbuckers are wax potted, and you love vintage tones, try a set of unpotted pickups.  I sold a set of Fralin pickups I had in one of my Strats and used the funds from the sale to upgrade my Les Paul.  I initially was going to get a new set of Seymour Duncan Seth Lovers, but I found a guy selling a set of used Wolfetone Dr. Vintage pickups for less than the cost of the new Seths so I went with those.  Wolfe has a fantastic reputation, and his pickups lived up to it.

The difference isn't huge, but it is significant.  They still sound like vintage pickups.  I had 57 Classics in there before, and the tone of the Dr. Vs is close to that.  But there is a slight microphonic chirp to the notes and a sweet bloom that just sings when you hold a note.  I use them primarily through one of two amplifiers, a Ceriatone Marshall 18 Watt clone and a Deluxe Reverb.  Through the Deluxe, they are sweet when clean and they get a perfect blues overdrive when you push it a little.  The 18 Watt sounds like 70s rock.  They nail Dickey Betts' Goldie tone through it, and they clean up nicely if you just twist the volume knob back a few notches.  With the 18 Watt, they do controlled feedback better than anything I've used.

These are not for 80s or 90s metal/rock/grunge.  They'll do that if you stack enough pedals or have enough amp, but they aren't suited for it.  They don't squeal at all at 70s rock levels -- up to AC/DC or even harder 80s rock like Guns n Roses.  But they would be unusable with a true high gain amp, I think.  What they are perfect for is rock and blues, especially 60s and 70s rock and blues.  ZZ Top, Black Crowes, AC/DC, Clapton's Beano tone, Allman Brothers, Mike Bloomfield -- it's all there.  I highly recommend trying a set.

This is some wonderful information.  Thank you immensely. 
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: David Garner on July 08, 2016, 09:24:14 AM
This is some wonderful information.  Thank you immensely.

You are most welcome.  This isn't me, but this demo is one of the reasons I took the chance on the pickups.  It gives a pretty good idea what they sound like through a Deluxe Reverb (his is a Deluxe clone), but the Marshall tone is what floors me.  It's just amazing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PFKpegXbJLs
Title: Re: Frivolous thread: Guitars
Post by: exegete77 on July 08, 2016, 12:07:08 PM
Here are a couple good pickers, one flattop picking, the other finger style

Wayne Henderson and Kruger Brothers (https://youtu.be/WyygKnJO--8?list=PLACDD8E8BB698AA44)

Wayne Henderson built his guitar and also for many top names in the guitar world.