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ALPB => Your Turn => Topic started by: Michael Slusser on January 07, 2013, 05:55:03 PM

Title: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Michael Slusser on January 07, 2013, 05:55:03 PM
The annual Week of Prayer for Christian Unity is January 18-25 this year. I would be interested to hear what plans others on this Forum may have.

Locally (Saint Paul, MN), the University of Saint Thomas and the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis have scheduled a lecture by Fr. Jared Wicks, S.J., who will speak on "The Ecumenical Imperative in Catholic Theology and Church Life"--in short, why the RCC must continue ecumenical relationships--in the evening of January 23.

The schedule:
5:00-6:00pm  Reception in the Anderson Student Center Hearth Room (Anderson Student Center 340)
6:00-7:15pm  Dinner in the Rogge-Leyden Room (ASC 364)
7:30pm  Lecture in the Owens Science Hall 3M Auditorium. The lecture is free and open to all.
Parking available in the Ramp at Cretin and Grand, next door to the Owens Science Hall.

Some of you heard Fr. Wicks when he spoke at the Lutheran CORE and NALC Theological Conference at Calvary Church in Golden Valley this summer.

If you are coming and would like to get together, PM me so I can look for you!

Peace,
Michael
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: vicarbob on January 07, 2013, 06:55:54 PM
When I served as a deacon in a congregation on Long Island I was the area's ecumenical "point" person for our community. For several years we observed this week with deliberate dedication and attentiveness. However, since my departure from the area, nothing has been done for about 5+ years. This is most unfortunate.
In the area of the Bronx where I currently serve, I had attempted to gather the local Christian clergy in my first years, but frankly gave up...esp when the local RCC never even responded to requests for a meeting. The truth be told, like my former pastor informed me..."Bob, if you can't get the local RCC behind the idea, you are just spinning your wheels".
My next call however will be different, in that I will be more persistent in ecumenical dialogue. The challenge will be the numerous store-front congregations which populate the community. The area is served by 3 mainline congregations, the RCC, the UMC and the congregation I will serve.
So in short Father, nada this year
Pax
Bob
However, on the Ecumenical Front, "we" have received a reasonable offer from the Coptic Orthodox Church to purchase our property in the Bronx.......Praise Be to GOD!.....and yes, we all joined in common prayer together in the chancel....and the priest referred to me as "My Reverend Brother in the Gospel"......
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: John_Hannah on January 08, 2013, 04:45:55 AM
I can't report anything this year for the Week of Christian Unity. However, in February (18-19) our STS chapter will host The Rev. Dr. William Rusch as our teaching theologian. Rusch was the ecumenical officer for the LCA, then ELCA. He will address the current ecumencial situation. Then in May our LCMS Circuit will host The Rev. Dr. Eugene Brand who will tell us about the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification. Brand was at the Lutheran World Federation when the JDDJ signed by all. I'm looking forward to both engagements.


Peace, JOHN
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: vicarbob on January 08, 2013, 08:46:38 PM
Yes, Yes, and Yes again on The Rev Dr William Rusch as teaching theologian at the NY Chapter of the STS on Feb 18-19.....missed him at the Florida Chapter Retreat after being invited by Pr L Recela......wow, no excuse now! As posted previously he was my sem prof for The Confessions....plus 2 other Lutheran courses at NYTS. Can't get any better them Dr Rusch!
pax
Bob

LTSP department head inquired.......oh, so you have taken the Confessions Mr Rainis....and just WHO was the professor..........oh, really..Ok then....we can move on to other required courses....did you take others with Dr Rusch..yes, such and such...OK, then...no need to take them here then........A Leading Lutheran theologian......without a doubt
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Johan Bergfest on January 11, 2013, 10:36:02 AM
Wouldn't it be nice if we could practice Christian unity in this forum for one week?
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Team Hesse on January 11, 2013, 11:53:14 AM
Wouldn't it be nice if we could practice Christian unity in this forum for one week?


What do you think that would look like?


Lou
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Johan Bergfest on January 11, 2013, 12:28:42 PM
Wouldn't it be nice if we could practice Christian unity in this forum for one week?


What do you think that would look like?


Lou

I think it would begin by clearly acknowledging that we all are sisters and brothers in Christ.  The way that some of the posts read, I'm not sure that we all agree that, in spite of our differences, we are one.
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Team Hesse on January 11, 2013, 01:30:27 PM
Wouldn't it be nice if we could practice Christian unity in this forum for one week?


What do you think that would look like?


Lou

I think it would begin by clearly acknowledging that we all are sisters and brothers in Christ.  The way that some of the posts read, I'm not sure that we all agree that, in spite of our differences, we are one.


But  so what? I have considered myself one in the faith with one of my mentors in the faith who died a convicted pedophile in the Oregon State Penitentiary. So what does this notion of oneness in the faith gain us in our notion of life together?


Lou
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Johan Bergfest on January 11, 2013, 05:24:40 PM
Wouldn't it be nice if we could practice Christian unity in this forum for one week?


What do you think that would look like?


Lou

I think it would begin by clearly acknowledging that we all are sisters and brothers in Christ.  The way that some of the posts read, I'm not sure that we all agree that, in spite of our differences, we are one.


But  so what? I have considered myself one in the faith with one of my mentors in the faith who died a convicted pedophile in the Oregon State Penitentiary. So what does this notion of oneness in the faith gain us in our notion of life together?


Lou

And, you know for certain that your former mentor died an impenitent sinner because.....................?

The notion of oneness in the faith would relieve us of the burden of judging one another which we ought to know isn't our responsibility, anyway.

The notion of oneness in the faith would set us free to ground all of our conversation with one another in John 17.
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: George Erdner on January 11, 2013, 08:11:32 PM
Wouldn't it be nice if we could practice Christian unity in this forum for one week?


What do you think that would look like?


Lou


I don't know what it would look like, but I know what it wouldn't look like. It wouldn't look like a discussion forum. I suspect it would consist of posts like "Such and such is good", followed by replies of "Yes, it is."


And that would be it.
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Team Hesse on January 11, 2013, 10:23:47 PM
Wouldn't it be nice if we could practice Christian unity in this forum for one week?


What do you think that would look like?


Lou

I think it would begin by clearly acknowledging that we all are sisters and brothers in Christ.  The way that some of the posts read, I'm not sure that we all agree that, in spite of our differences, we are one.


But  so what? I have considered myself one in the faith with one of my mentors in the faith who died a convicted pedophile in the Oregon State Penitentiary. So what does this notion of oneness in the faith gain us in our notion of life together?


Lou

And, you know for certain that your former mentor died an impenitent sinner because.....................?

The notion of oneness in the faith would relieve us of the burden of judging one another which we ought to know isn't our responsibility, anyway.

The notion of oneness in the faith would set us free to ground all of our conversation with one another in John 17.


Odd that you should judge me so. I made no such comment about my mentor's repentance or lack thereof--point of fact is that I believe he was repentant (I won't go into why I believe that) . And it is not my place to judge such things, but I must for the sake of my neighbor, agree with the finding of the court that my beloved mentor must be incarcerated.


This side of the eschaton we are left with having to deal precisely with such realities. We are still sinners, still in need of the accusation of the law, as long as we have that "bag of worms" our old flesh around our necks as Luther put it. Judge my neighbors status before the Lord--No. Judge his behavior toward our mutual neighbors--necessary.


Lou
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Johan Bergfest on January 11, 2013, 11:13:57 PM
Wouldn't it be nice if we could practice Christian unity in this forum for one week?


What do you think that would look like?


Lou

I think it would begin by clearly acknowledging that we all are sisters and brothers in Christ.  The way that some of the posts read, I'm not sure that we all agree that, in spite of our differences, we are one.


But  so what? I have considered myself one in the faith with one of my mentors in the faith who died a convicted pedophile in the Oregon State Penitentiary. So what does this notion of oneness in the faith gain us in our notion of life together?


Lou

And, you know for certain that your former mentor died an impenitent sinner because.....................?

The notion of oneness in the faith would relieve us of the burden of judging one another which we ought to know isn't our responsibility, anyway.

The notion of oneness in the faith would set us free to ground all of our conversation with one another in John 17.


Odd that you should judge me so. I made no such comment about my mentor's repentance or lack thereof--point of fact is that I believe he was repentant (I won't go into why I believe that) . And it is not my place to judge such things, but I must for the sake of my neighbor, agree with the finding of the court that my beloved mentor must be incarcerated.


This side of the eschaton we are left with having to deal precisely with such realities. We are still sinners, still in need of the accusation of the law, as long as we have that "bag of worms" our old flesh around our necks as Luther put it. Judge my neighbors status before the Lord--No. Judge his behavior toward our mutual neighbors--necessary.


Lou

Pr. Hesse - I don't think I judged you.  I just responded to your post in the context of this particular conversation.  I presumed that, because you brought up your mentor as an example, the implication was that you/we could not have unity of the faith with him following his conviction.  I apologize if I misread it that way because, based on your next reply, you seemed to indicate that you did.  The second sentence of my reply was not specific to you but a more generic reference.
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Team Hesse on January 12, 2013, 08:45:32 AM
Then how does our unity in the faith free us from the necessity of specific judgement of specific behavior? Fallen humans will always see through the glass darkly and not realize that things they think are consistent with God's will are actually harmful. I simply don't see what an emphasis on unity accomplishes. When I served on the ELCA task force on Sexuality that seemed to be the thing we talked about the most and as I said at the Churchwide Assembly in Orlando, " the surest sign of disunity is passing resolutions on unity." To talk about unity is to ensure it does not exist. Unity is done to us, it is not something we achieve.


Lou
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Johan Bergfest on January 12, 2013, 08:48:32 AM
Pr. Hesse - I'm not asking for resolutions on unity.  I'm suggesting that we all behave with confidence that we are one in Christ, irrespective of the things that divide us.
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Team Hesse on January 12, 2013, 08:53:58 AM
Pr. Hesse - I'm not asking for resolutions on unity.  I'm suggesting that we all behave with confidence that we are one in Christ, irrespective of the things that divide us.


So what would that look like? How would it be different than what we are actually living?


Lou
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Johan Bergfest on January 12, 2013, 11:30:27 AM
Pr. Hesse - I'm not asking for resolutions on unity.  I'm suggesting that we all behave with confidence that we are one in Christ, irrespective of the things that divide us.


So what would that look like? How would it be different than what we are actually living?


Lou


We are living as though we define ourselves and others on the basis of the differences about which we argue.  We were to approach those conversations on the basis of our oneness in Christ, we would look a little more like sisters and brothers who really do love each other and a lot less like a hopelessly dysfunctional family.
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Team Hesse on January 12, 2013, 12:19:59 PM
Pr. Hesse - I'm not asking for resolutions on unity.  I'm suggesting that we all behave with confidence that we are one in Christ, irrespective of the things that divide us.


So what would that look like? How would it be different than what we are actually living?


Lou


We are living as though we define ourselves and others on the basis of the differences about which we argue.  We were to approach those conversations on the basis of our oneness in Christ, we would look a little more like sisters and brothers who really do love each other and a lot less like a hopelessly dysfunctional family.



This strikes me as terribly utopian. In this I agree with Oprah--if you think your family is not dysfunctional--you haven't looked very deeply at it.....


It is not possible, even in a nuclear family, for all members to agree on what a family ethos may be. This is why families grow apart and end up recombining and redefining themselves from generation to generation. Family itself is a considerably fluid abstract in our time.


Lou



Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Johan Bergfest on January 12, 2013, 12:44:00 PM


This strikes me as terribly utopian. In this I agree with Oprah--if you think your family is not dysfunctional--you haven't looked very deeply at it.....


It is not possible, even in a nuclear family, for all members to agree on what a family ethos may be. This is why families grow apart and end up recombining and redefining themselves from generation to generation. Family itself is a considerably fluid abstract in our time.



Utopia strikes me as a very peculiar way of thinking about the new heaven and the new earth which God has promised and my suggestion that we aspire to live today out of the promise that already has been fulfilled in eternity.  I am not suggesting that we agree with one another on everything.  I am suggesting that we start treating our sisters and brothers as sisters and brothers and stop treating them as adversaries.  And, in all honesty, I have great difficulty understanding why a brother in Christ would have such difficulty comprehending that.
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Brian Stoffregen on January 12, 2013, 04:03:56 PM
Pr. Hesse - I'm not asking for resolutions on unity.  I'm suggesting that we all behave with confidence that we are one in Christ, irrespective of the things that divide us.


So what would that look like? How would it be different than what we are actually living?


Lou


We are living as though we define ourselves and others on the basis of the differences about which we argue.  We were to approach those conversations on the basis of our oneness in Christ, we would look a little more like sisters and brothers who really do love each other and a lot less like a hopelessly dysfunctional family.



This strikes me as terribly utopian. In this I agree with Oprah--if you think your family is not dysfunctional--you haven't looked very deeply at it.....


It is not possible, even in a nuclear family, for all members to agree on what a family ethos may be. This is why families grow apart and end up recombining and redefining themselves from generation to generation. Family itself is a considerably fluid abstract in our time.


Even in dysfunctional families, the members recognize that they are family. They have a connection with each other that they don't have with other people.
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Team Hesse on January 12, 2013, 06:28:39 PM


This strikes me as terribly utopian. In this I agree with Oprah--if you think your family is not dysfunctional--you haven't looked very deeply at it.....


It is not possible, even in a nuclear family, for all members to agree on what a family ethos may be. This is why families grow apart and end up recombining and redefining themselves from generation to generation. Family itself is a considerably fluid abstract in our time.



Utopia strikes me as a very peculiar way of thinking about the new heaven and the new earth which God has promised and my suggestion that we aspire to live today out of the promise that already has been fulfilled in eternity.  I am not suggesting that we agree with one another on everything.  I am suggesting that we start treating our sisters and brothers as sisters and brothers and stop treating them as adversaries.  And, in all honesty, I have great difficulty understanding why a brother in Christ would have such difficulty comprehending that.


New heaven and new earth are utopia....bit it takes the death of the old to bring in the new. Christ said "take up your cross and follow me." To expect any more than a foretaste of the feast to come in this old world that is approaching final judgement is to disavow the eschatological boundary. To do so is deeply problematic because this side of the boundary we continue to see through the glass darkly. We have faith, not sight. We can be wrong....and often are.


Lou
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Johan Bergfest on January 12, 2013, 08:00:34 PM
We can take up our cross and follow Jesus and also live out of our promised future.  Unless we live out of that future, I don't know how we can bear the weight of that cross.  Moreover, when we insist on defining one another by our differences, in a way we imply that that future is not for those with whom we disagree.
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Norman Teigen on January 14, 2013, 06:29:25 AM
I am grateful to Father Slusser for his kind and gracious invitation to attend this lecture.  I plan to attend.
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Norman Teigen on January 14, 2013, 10:06:21 AM
I am open to reading suggestions in preparation for my attending this lecture next week.  I do not have access to a theological library.
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Michael Slusser on January 17, 2013, 09:30:16 AM
Vatican City, 17 January 2013 (VIS) Ė Today the Pope received in audience an ecumenical delegation from the Lutheran Church of Finland during their annual pilgrimage to Rome on the occasion of the feast of Saint Henry of Uppsala, patron saint of Finland.

The Holy Father once again showed his pleasure in receiving the delegates on this traditional visit, observing that it was also fitting that the meeting took place on the eve of the celebrations to take place during the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity. The theme for this year's ecumenical Week of Prayer, "What does God require of us?", is taken from a passage in the book of the prophet Micah.

"The Prophet," said the Pope, "makes clear, of course, what the Lord requires of us. It is 'to do justice, to love kindness, and to walk humbly with our God'. The Christmas season that we have just celebrated reminds us that it is God who from the beginning has walked with us and who, in the fullness of time, took flesh in order to save us from our sins and to guide our steps in the way of holiness, justice and peace."

"Walking humbly in the presence of the Lord, in obedience to his saving word and with trust in his gracious plan, serves as an eloquent image not only of the life of faith, but also of our ecumenical journey on the path towards the full and visible unity of all Christians. On this path of discipleship, we are called to advance together along the narrow road of fidelity to Godís sovereign will in facing whatever difficulties or obstacles we may eventually encounter."

Therefore, "to advance in the ways of ecumenical communion," the pontiff emphasized, "demands that we become ever more united in prayer, ever more committed to the pursuit of holiness, and ever more engaged in the areas of theological research and cooperation in the service of a just and fraternal society. Along this way of spiritual ecumenism, we truly walk with God and with one another in justice and love, for, as the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification affirms: 'We are accepted by God and receive the Holy Spirit, who renews our hearts while equipping and calling us to good works'."

The Pope concluded his address expressing the desire that the Finnish delegation's visit to Rome "will help to strengthen ecumenical relations between all Christians in Finland. Let us thank God for all that has been achieved so far and let us pray that the Spirit of truth will guide Christís followers in your country towards ever greater love and unity as they strive to live in the light of the Gospel and to bring that light to the great moral issues facing our societies today. By walking together in humility along the path of justice, mercy and righteousness which the Lord has pointed out to us, Christians will not only dwell in the truth, but also be beacons of joy and hope to all those who are looking for a sure point of reference in our rapidly changing world."

Peace,
Michael
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Norman Teigen on January 17, 2013, 09:55:46 AM
Thank you for this information and thank you for sending me the link to the Vatican document on the subject.

Any other suggestions?

norman61@icloud.com
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Michael Slusser on January 17, 2013, 02:52:04 PM
From our local Catholic paper (appears also to be syndicated):
http://thecatholicspirit.com/opinion/commentary/why-does-ecumenism-matter/ (http://thecatholicspirit.com/opinion/commentary/why-does-ecumenism-matter/)

Author is Dr. Christian Washburn, a member of the international Lutheran-Catholic Dialogue as well as of the US Lutheran-Catholic Dialogue. A brief description of the January 23 speaker at the University of Saint Thomas is attached to the article.

Peace,
Michael
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: cssml on January 20, 2013, 11:42:53 AM
In his Sunday Angelus,  Pope Benedict talks again on Christian unity:

"One of the most serious sins that disfigures the face of the Church is its visible lack of unity, especially the historical divisions that have separated Christians and which have not yet been completely resolved."
 
http://www.asianews.it/news-en/Pope:-Historical-divisions-among-Christians-one-of-the-most-serious-sins-that-disfigure-Church-26913.html

Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Norman Teigen on January 24, 2013, 08:48:19 AM
I was very pleased to attend the lecture of Father Jared Weeks at St. Thomas University in St. Paul last night.  The lecture was part of the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity.  I attended the lecture because of the kind invitation of Father Michael Slusser whom I  met via ALPB.

I am a layman and I come from the very conservative theological tradition of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod.  I realize now that I am 70 years old that the conservative Lutheran theological tradition might possibly have some deficiencies of perspective.   Even at my advanced age it is possible to learn something new.  What better way to gain perspective by attending a lecture at one of the most distinguished universities in this metropolitan area.

Norman Teigen, Layman
Evangelical Lutheran Synod
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: D. Engebretson on January 24, 2013, 09:29:36 AM
I realize now that I am 70 years old that the conservative Lutheran theological tradition might possibly have some deficiencies of perspective.   

What "deficiencies of perspective" have you discovered?  Are they just in your synodical tradition (ELS), in the Lutheran church in general, or in the theological essence of Lutheranism itself?
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: vicarbob on January 24, 2013, 09:39:13 AM
Mr Teigen, thank you for your comments on your experience and reflection after participating in that lecture. God bless you and Fr Michael for the kind invitation.
pax
Bob+
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Norman Teigen on January 24, 2013, 09:52:48 AM
As they say on late night television, there's more.  I plan a series of posts on this topic throughout the day.  I want to list some of the ways in which Catholics and Lutherans are united.   I will, from my notes, try to summarize some of the major points which the speaker made.  I will try to, respectfully, answer Engebretson's question.

I hope that the persons who read this will understand that I am a layman, that I am not theologically trained, that I am not interested in bashing the Evangelical Lutheran Synod (or any other ecclesiastical organization), that I am not inclined to swim the Tiber, that I do not possess any particular wisdom on any topic whatever.   

I am an old man who is trying to sort things out.   I am a product of the Vietnam and Watergate erasand I have for a long time realized that those in power don't have all of the answers.   There is a new generation of leadership in the conservative Lutheran tradition that doesn't know Watergate and Vietnam and its lessons as they apply to church matters.    The directions which these new leaders are moving  the conservative Lutheran tradition are troublesome.  It is time to look at things from a fresh perspective.


Norman Teigen, Layman
Evangelical Lutheran Synod
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Norman Teigen on January 24, 2013, 10:14:05 AM
The Lutheran Confessions begin with the three ecumenical creeds, The Apostles' Creed, The Nicene Creed, and The Creed of Athanasius.  The Lutherans wanted to place themselves in the tradition of the apostolic fathers.   

This is a starting point for any consideration of possible unity between the Roman Catholic Church and the Lutheran tradition.

In my ELS church we confess the Apostles' Creed and the Nicene Creed quite regularly.  We do the Athanasian creed once a year.

When we confess the Nicene Creed we state CONFITEOR UNAM BAPTISMA IN REMISSIONEM PECCATORUM.

Norman Teigen, Layman
Evangelical Lutheran Synod

Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Norman Teigen on January 24, 2013, 08:28:02 PM
The speaker last night was Father Jared Weeks.  The title of his speech was "The Ecumenical Imperative in Catholic Life."  He was speaking to Catholics.

I took notes but admit that after 50 years I am not such a good taker of notes.  I was pleased and surprised that a modern lecture hall has foldable table tops and when I figured out this modern advancement in lecture hall chairs, the task was made easier for me. 

The speech was made in three parts.  The first part was the imperative of Pope John Paul II to Catholics for the action of ecumenical activity.   In 1995 Pope Paul II updated the Vatican II decree on ecumenism [pr. eh-cue-men-ism with the accent on -men-] UNITATIS REDINTEGRATIO.  (Father Slusser had recommended in advance that I read this and I am glad that I did so.). 

The Council and the Pope emphasize that there is a moral imperative for ecumenism and that it is a precise call of the Lord.

In the second part, Father Weeks stated that ecumenism arises from the heart of Catholic theology.  Catholic ecclesiology is complex and not reducible to simple slogans.  A related concept is that the Roman Catholic Church essence is complete, but the experience is not.

Finally, Father Weeks related this to personal testimony.  I was pleased and surprised to hear Father Weeks acknowledge how much Luther had meant to his own personal development.  The idea of SIMUL IUSTUS ET PECCATOR, the two opposing forces in a Christian's life  God is with us, said Luther, to liberate us from darkness of sin and death and raise us up to eternal life.

My notes are admittedly incomplete but perhaps the readers will get the gist of the speech.

Father Slusser indicated to me that he is working on a book about Melanchthon.  I was pleased to meet Christian Washburn who is the chairman of the St. Paul Seminary School of Divinity, a  Reformation specialist.     

As a Lutheran, I was gratified to see how highly Luther is regarded by the participants.   
Title: Re: Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, January 18-25, 2013
Post by: Michael Slusser on January 26, 2013, 02:12:55 PM
Cardinal Koch, head of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, gave an interview to the news service KNA that came out today, on how he sees the whole ecumenical situation as this Week of Prayer for Christian Unity ends. Among other things, he said,

Quote
INTERVIEWER: 2017 will bring the 500-year commemoration of the Reformation. How is it going with the joint statement on that topic, which you have helped to develop with the Lutheran World Federation?

KOCH: The declaration should be released soon; at the moment the translations are being made. The text is entitled "From Conflict to communion." It presents the conflict against its historical background, but also everything that the ecumenical dialogue has achieved in the past 50 years on the road towards greater communion: Where we can see unity, where we have reached common ground, and where obstacles remain.

Peace,
Michael