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Your Turn / Re: Election 2020
« Last post by Charles Austin on Today at 05:48:15 PM »
Peter, you can check the veracity of your claims on the Open Secrets site about campaign contributions. Some things there might surprise you.
The details, of course, are complicated, but money-wonks can read them on that site if they want to.
Less "media money" has gone to Biden that you might expect.
At least one billionaire formerly gave to Republicans, but now gave 3 million to Biden.
A lot of money to Biden comes, apparently, in small donations.
A lot of money to Trump comes from right-wing PACs.
The Federal Election Commission also provides data, but not broken down very much.
As I often say, it's complicated. But there are devils in the details, and no doubt some money-wonks will poke them out.

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Your Turn / Re: Supreme Court with Justice Barrett on Board
« Last post by James on Today at 05:36:31 PM »
Consider a quota for women. In the House at least two per state.
That will be tough for Montana, Delaware, the Dakotas, Alaska, Wyoming, and Vermont. 😁
The day voting in the United States is reduced to a quota system, we have lost our independence!

On another front, some sort of term limits could be a possibility .. in my younger years, I was opposed to term limits .. the idea being that voters should control terms via elections. 

Having second thoughts as I age .. some legislators are re-elected solely due to their ability to bring pork dollars home .. using our tax dollars for home district pork barrel projects.

Our founding fathers did not envision career politicians ... George Washington voluntarily served two term ... went home and resumed working like the rest of us.

The idea that politicians of both parties feel in incumbent on themselves to die in the saddle is troubling.  The career politicians of today are more concerned about keeping their jobs than serving the public.   Some sort of term limits ... long enough to benefit from some experience ... short enough that they and their electorate do not become dependent on Washington pork.

One possible drawback .. with less experienced elected office holders, would we be more at the mercy of career bureaucrats whose role and power may increase due to the relative inexperience of the short termed elected legislators.
As I understand it, the Wyoming state legislature members are not paid. They receive a per diem while in session; so they try to get their work done quickly so that they can go back to their jobs where they make money. The down side of this is that only people wealthy enough (or retired) who can afford to take a month or two off to do state business.

Perhaps we could have a law that senators and representatives cannot receive any other income except their federal pay so that they are not influenced by any corporations. No fees for speaking engagements. No compensation for serving on boards, etc.
Why pick on the Senators ...are you going to allow the Representatives outside income?

Interesting ... on another thread you support payment for literary/musical works ... now speaker should speak gratis??  Next thing you will is muzzle our legislators and prohibit them from writing books as well ... or perhaps simply deny them renumeration for work done.

From what is understood, the Texas legislature meets every other year for 140 days ... unless special session(s) are called
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Your Turn / Re: For All the Saints
« Last post by Brian Stoffregen on Today at 05:10:14 PM »
Any idea what percentage the author/copyright holders receive?

Hopefully it’s not like the farmers ... they do the majority of the work and receive only a small percentage of the sales proceeds.


It depends on what kind of agreement there is between the artist and the copyright holder. It can range from the publisher paying a fee for the work, then the publisher owns it and reaps the profits from copyright fees. There can be a royalties agreement that the artist receives a percentage of every copy sold. I met a man who had a song in the LBW. Every so often he'd receive a check for a few bucks from the royalties received from hymnals being sold.


For years John Ylvisaker published and copyrighted his own songs. License agreements and copying fees went directly to him - to his home address in Waverly, IA. (In later years, his works, came under LicenSing.) This meant that he had to keep track of all the licenses or hire someone to do it for him.
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Your Turn / Re: Election 2020
« Last post by James on Today at 05:05:58 PM »
Peter, the problem with money in politics is not where it goes. It’s where it comes from.
The billionaire money goes to Biden. Silicon Valley. Hollywood. Wall St.  The point is that in presidential races there hasn't been much correlation between spending more and winning anyway.
Yes ... it seems crooked Hillary outspend President Trump by magnitudes in 2016. 

Apparently the thought was that the election could be purchased by the west coast elite.🤫🤭
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Your Turn / Re: Election 2020
« Last post by peter_speckhard on Today at 04:21:08 PM »
Peter, the problem with money in politics is not where it goes. It’s where it comes from.
The billionaire money goes to Biden. Silicon Valley. Hollywood. Wall St.  The point is that in presidential races there hasn't been much correlation between spending more and winning anyway.   
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Your Turn / Re: Election 2020
« Last post by Charles Austin on Today at 03:46:51 PM »
Peter, the problem with money in politics is not where it goes. It’s where it comes from.
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Your Turn / Re: For All the Saints
« Last post by James on Today at 03:30:23 PM »
Any idea what percentage the author/copyright holders receive?

Hopefully it’s not like the farmers ... they do the majority of the work and receive only a small percentage of the sales proceeds.
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Your Turn / Re: For All the Saints
« Last post by Brian Stoffregen on Today at 02:17:17 PM »
In the case of For All the Saints, a surprising number of the quotations required that royalties be paid to the publisher. From the account in Changing World, Changeless Christ:

What complicated this project considerably was the need to obtain copyright permission for many of these fourth readings, as well as for many of the prayers—permission that had to come from several different publishers or individuals, each of them with their own policies, paperwork requirements and time frames for response. “We were naïve … in thinking that most publishers would simply write back ‘permission granted,’” Schumacher explained. “Not so!”

"Augsburg Fortress, our own Lutheran publishing house, charged us for almost every one of the quotes that came from their books and in one situation in which I had made a mistake in asking for a permission in which we were charged we later discovered that the book from Fortress which they had charged us for was quoting the work in another publication that was now in the public domain. A few quotes from Fortress were free, but [for] most we were charged anywhere from $5.00 to $50.00." 

The single most expensive quotation was from Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Strength to Love. The agency representing Dr. King’s family asked $400 for the single quote—so much more than any other publisher that Schumacher was inclined to omit it from the book. When he reported this to the board, one member, Ruth Zerner, felt so strongly that at least one quote from King be included that she offered to pay for the quote personally. Ultimately a price of $150 was negotiated, and the quotation was included.

There were other publishers—including Concordia Publishing House and several Roman Catholic companies—who allowed the use of their material without charge. The Roman Catholic Church’s International Committee on the Liturgy gave permission to incorporate prayers from The Liturgy of the Hours. The Episcopal Church’s copyright agent responded that the Book of Common Prayer was in the public domain and only its format was under copyright; so along with its translation of the Psalter, many prayers from the Book of Common Prayer were used. This generosity allowed the Bureau to keep the cost of the project manageable.
 
One important decision concerned which Bible translation should be used in the breviary. The National Council of Churches held the copyright for both the Revised Standard Version and the New Revised Standard Version, and there was a significant cost for either. The NRSV was being increasingly used in ELCA congregations, but in the end the decision came down to economics; the National Council of Churches agreed to accept a $300 payment to use the older RSV, with a promise of an additional payment later if the publication was a success. That promise was ultimately fulfilled with a gift of $5,000 from the ALPB to the NCC.


I ran into similar issues when creating worship folders for synod assemblies. Before there was OneLicense.com and CCLI and LicenSing that combined many publishers, I had to contact each separate copyright holder for each song (which, in some cases could be more than one: there can be separate copyrights for melody, lyrics, translation, and arrangement). The reprint charges varied from nothing (GIA was good about giving free permission,) to $500 for one song. The permission we asked for was only for disposable copies that included melody line and lyrics. There could have been extra fees for projecting words or copies in 4-part harmony. (We bought music with accompaniment for the musicians.)


My critique of For All the Saints, and it's a personal issue, is: I don't care for the RSV translation. That is so dated to me. I don't care much for the NRSV translation either, but I use it for study; but almost never used it for the public reading of scriptures in worship. Most of the folks in the pews do not have a biblical literate level of 10-11 grade, which is about its reading level. It was also not translated with public reading as the primary means of using it. For a devotional book, I would have preferred a more modern translation - more of a paraphrase. I remember my mother-in-law exclaiming when she first read the Good News Bible: "This can't be the Bible; I can understand it!"
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Your Turn / Re: Election 2020
« Last post by DeHall1 on Today at 01:22:14 PM »
Go ahead DeHall1.  Show me your stuff.  What do you see?

I see 2 documents from different Lutheran church bodies that are helpful tools for people to become better stewards of their citizenship.

One document (The LCMS Voter's guide) limits it's topics to those areas the "Institutional Church" has specifically addressed in some form or fashion.

The other is broader in scope, identifying "14 guides for assessing the performance of government", as well as a number of things to consider at the local, state, and federal level.

MOO, both documents offer sound advice and information, and neither are inappropriate.

**Addendum - Both documents encourage advocacy about particular issues **

Your turn -- Why is one document inappropriate while the other is not....Or are both inappropriate?

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Your Turn / Re: Election 2020
« Last post by Norman Teigen on Today at 12:37:17 PM »
Go ahead DeHall1.  Show me your stuff.  What do you see?
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